Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/3080

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MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5085
Country: United States

Wow beautiful shots John. That 45mm is amazing



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 5949
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
Wow beautiful shots John. That 45mm is amazing


Thanks Ray.

The 45/2.8 does quite well - especially if you don't look at the very far corners..

I must admit that some times I wish I had something at f/2 and a little wider. So the CV 40/2 is perhaps on my list of new acquisitions . . .



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 4618
Country: China

CGrindahl wrote:
pburke wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
rankamateur wrote:
Just in case you ever wanted to know what a Cicada looks like close up! This poor fella was dug up by one of the ground wasps but he was still moving some. PB-6 Bellow, PK-13 and BR-2A reversing ring with the 55 2.8 Micro

This is so cool. I also think this is the first bellows shot in the thread. Should post this in the macro section also. any shot of the whole bug? I have never seen one.


check out this video about the 17-year cicada cycle
http://vimeo.com/66688653


Awesome video Peter. I have a vague recollection of knowing this but the video tells the story beautifully. I can't help but wonder whether the cicada Ron photographed was in its hibernation waiting for its climb up the tree. Nature is amazing. Thanks for sharing this.


17 years? I wish! We get them EVERY year here in Shanghai. Millions of them making the most ear shattering noise all day and evening long. It never ends. That and there seems to be a huge infestation of dragon flies this summer. Thousands of them everywhere, even very far from water where they normally reside.



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 4618
Country: China

OK, flickr is back up now so i can post a bit more. Here are some shots of inside the Jing'an temple.

First the courtyard, where you can see the very "Buddhist" practice of throwing money into a tall kettle. Of course there is nothing Buddhist about such a odd concept, yet you see it everywhere iN China.













Then a few shots inside the worship halls. These were very dark and I was shooting ISO100 film so shutter speeds are as close to being too slow to shoot as you can get.

Hard to get a sense of scale in this shot. Those fans on the right are about chest high.







This is a wooden statue, said to weigh over 10 tons. I am on a balcony looking slightly down at the statue. It is quite tall.







Strange, but the photo of the main Buddha statue (15 tons of pure silver) will not load at the moment. i'll have to post that one later.





rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 4618
Country: China

here is the main Buddha statue, made from pure silver, 15 tons of it. I hope this link works.







leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9279
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
One Tom I can handle, but two is a challenge when you've known one of them for almost three years by another name. Yes, I knew Leighton's first name is Tom and I even called him that from time to time when we exchanged emails. but then I fell back to calling him Leighton simply to keep things straight in my mind. If you don't mind my friend, I'll keep calling your Leighton. I'm having enough change in my life at the moment... Two Peters is enough...


I think it would be wise for you and everyone else to call me Leighton. I won't know who you're talking to if you don't!



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9279
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
A few today taken with the 300mm 4.5 AIS and 35mm 1.4 AIS I used my new tripod today for the first time and I absolutely love it. I thought it would crimp my style but it actually added to it







Ray these are very sharp, no doubt that the tripod helped. I don't do a whole lot of nature shooting, but this is the best way to go about, with a tripod, IMHO. Whenever I do use one, it really slows me down and makes me look at composition more. Well done.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9279
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
Wow beautiful shots John. That 45mm is amazing


+1



a.RodriguezPix
Registered: Oct 31, 2011
Total Posts: 2237
Country: United States


a.Rollei.Brujo-75 copy by aRolleiBrujo, on Flickr



MarkdV
Registered: Jul 05, 2012
Total Posts: 715
Country: Poland

Very nice bird shots Ray, and the lake scene is very pretty as well. I must remember to take and use my tripod more.

Georg, great shot of the cliffs and love the ferry mit stormy sky shot.

John, stunning shots from your Cascades walk. I must get up into the mountains sometime this season. And get a 16mm.



NightOwl Cat
Registered: Feb 19, 2007
Total Posts: 7697
Country: United States

Ray, stunning bird shots with the tripod!

John, love the newest shots.

Kevin, hope you take that class, I'm finding mine fun, even though right now the pressure is on to get things wrapped up for the final presentation.



NightOwl Cat
Registered: Feb 19, 2007
Total Posts: 7697
Country: United States

Ratty, nice shots from the temple. I'm guessing that it's not the Buddhist monks that started that tradition of throwing money in those large kettles.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 13091
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:
CGrindahl wrote:
pburke wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
rankamateur wrote:
Just in case you ever wanted to know what a Cicada looks like close up! This poor fella was dug up by one of the ground wasps but he was still moving some. PB-6 Bellow, PK-13 and BR-2A reversing ring with the 55 2.8 Micro

This is so cool. I also think this is the first bellows shot in the thread. Should post this in the macro section also. any shot of the whole bug? I have never seen one.


check out this video about the 17-year cicada cycle
http://vimeo.com/66688653


Awesome video Peter. I have a vague recollection of knowing this but the video tells the story beautifully. I can't help but wonder whether the cicada Ron photographed was in its hibernation waiting for its climb up the tree. Nature is amazing. Thanks for sharing this.


17 years? I wish! We get them EVERY year here in Shanghai. Millions of them making the most ear shattering noise all day and evening long. It never ends. That and there seems to be a huge infestation of dragon flies this summer. Thousands of them everywhere, even very far from water where they normally reside.



I was musing about that myself and concluded that while individual cicadas have a 17 year cycle, the billions that exist on the planet are all on different cycles so we have a fresh crop appearing each year. I'd also wonder whether the 17 year figure is dependent in any way on weather. I could imagine that in warmer climates the cycle would be shorter but that is a guess. But I found this when I did a search on cicadas in California...

Approximately one hundred and fifty-three species of cicadas in seventeen genera have been de- scribed from the United States. Of these, sixty-five species in eight genera are known to occur in California. Since the works of Van h z e e (1915) and Davis (1919, 1920), no extensive keys to any of the genera have been published. This study presents not only a contemporary picture of the taxonomic status of this group but also attempts to further a renewed interest in the study of the family.

Unfortunately, only general information is available on the life histories of the California species of cicadas. Of the few for which brood years have been noted, the time required to complete the life cycle would seem to be from two to five years.


So not every cicada has a 17 years cycle and there are 153 different species... doubtless some that speak only Chinese...



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 13091
Country: United States

I thought I'd posted a comment on your last set of images Ray but I can't find it, so I'll write again. Gorgeous! You make Florida look almost inviting... Sue is in Delray Beach at the moment and she happens to enjoy the warm weather and humidity. In the meantime we have cool nights with temperatures in the mid-fifties and days in the mid-eighties. I vote for that...

You have a great eye for composition Ray. I'm looking forward to your tripod adventures in the coming weeks. I did a quick search on that tripod and found a number of critical comments about the capacity of the ball head to hold the camera without slipping. I wonder how it handled the 300 which weighs a couple of pounds with the tripod collar. Are you happy with performance of the tripod? I'm not prepared to take the leap myself, but I'm certainly gathering information along the way...



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 2879
Country: United States

NightOwl Cat wrote:
Kevin, hope you take that class, I'm finding mine fun, even though right now the pressure is on to get things wrapped up for the final presentation.

I won't have too. I am the admin in the department and all the photo people love me. I can use the labs and developers whenever I want too. My last roll of film was developed by an advanced film student. Had it done and scanned in a day. We also have some very nice scanners so the 35mm scans I get are larger than the RAW files from my D7000.



MarkdV
Registered: Jul 05, 2012
Total Posts: 715
Country: Poland

Getting in ahead of the weekend rush.

Sorry for the large number, but family coming tomorrow from NZ so it may be my last time to post for a while (I'll still be reading and enjoying everyones contributions though).

Anyway, away from the brief detour to ol' Blighty and back to the wonders of that magnificent country of France.

Still on Day 2, The day finally cleared up near the end of the day. In my new (dry) shoes I went around the coast to a bird reserve where I had a good chat to the site administrator and then actually took some photos, unleashing the 50 and 24mm lenses on the countryside. After that I went back to the camp site and a couple of shots while relaxing on the beach.





jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 5949
Country: United States

Thanks Mark and Laura and Leighton (and anyone else I forgot to mention). We are all tired today, but glad for it. I need to find a new backpack to carry my photo gear plus backpacking stuff . . .



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5085
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
I thought I'd posted a comment on your last set of images Ray but I can't find it, so I'll write again. Gorgeous! You make Florida look almost inviting... Sue is in Delray Beach at the moment and she happens to enjoy the warm weather and humidity. In the meantime we have cool nights with temperatures in the mid-fifties and days in the mid-eighties. I vote for that...

You have a great eye for composition Ray. I'm looking forward to your tripod adventures in the coming weeks. I did a quick search on that tripod and found a number of critical comments about the capacity of the ball head to hold the camera without slipping. I wonder how it handled the 300 which weighs a couple of pounds with the tripod collar. Are you happy with performance of the tripod? I'm not prepared to take the leap myself, but I'm certainly gathering information along the way...

I used the 300 EDIF with the tripod collar with the ball head connected to the mount and not the camera. I did not notice any slippage what-so-ever. I would set the angle and the tripod held like a grip. It was great for a stationary object but when the birds flew away it was difficult to follow using the tripod.
I used it mostly for the 24mm and 35mm for landscape and I had no problems at all using the tripod. In fact it made my shooting actually easier .
Here's a photo that I really liked using the 35mm 1.4 - F11 - 1/13th







kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 2879
Country: United States

MarkdV wrote:
Getting in ahead of the weekend rush.

Sorry for the large number, but family coming tomorrow from NZ so it may be my last time to post for a while (I'll still be reading and enjoying everyones contributions though).

Anyway, away from the brief detour to ol' Blighty and back to the wonders of that magnificent country of France.

Still on Day 2, The day finally cleared up near the end of the day. In my new (dry) shoes I went around the coast to a bird reserve where I had a good chat to the site administrator and then actually took some photos, unleashing the 50 and 24mm lenses on the countryside. After that I went back to the camp site and a couple of shots while relaxing on the beach.




Mark, love "The Fence"... What a great shot.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 2879
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
CGrindahl wrote:
I thought I'd posted a comment on your last set of images Ray but I can't find it, so I'll write again. Gorgeous! You make Florida look almost inviting... Sue is in Delray Beach at the moment and she happens to enjoy the warm weather and humidity. In the meantime we have cool nights with temperatures in the mid-fifties and days in the mid-eighties. I vote for that...

You have a great eye for composition Ray. I'm looking forward to your tripod adventures in the coming weeks. I did a quick search on that tripod and found a number of critical comments about the capacity of the ball head to hold the camera without slipping. I wonder how it handled the 300 which weighs a couple of pounds with the tripod collar. Are you happy with performance of the tripod? I'm not prepared to take the leap myself, but I'm certainly gathering information along the way...

I used the 300 EDIF with the tripod collar with the ball head connected to the mount and not the camera. I did not notice any slippage what-so-ever. I would set the angle and the tripod held like a grip. It was great for a stationary object but when the birds flew away it was difficult to follow using the tripod.I did notice slippage if I connected to the camera. I used it mostly for the 24mm and 35mm for landscape and I had no problems at all using the tripod. In fact it made my shooting actually easier .
Here's a photo that I really liked using the 35mm 1.4 - F11 - 1/13th






At least with a ball head, it is easier to pan... I am using a 3 axis head, so it pans great in any of the individual axis, but is tough if you are trying to track like a bird in flight. I love using a tripod for panoramas, makes stitching more successful. I find it almost a requirement when doing any macro over 1:2... The only downside is if the weather isn't perfect. I have a lot of shots where the wind blew during exposure, causing the tree to move.

I love the shot above, draws you right in and makes the viewer want to keep on the path.


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