Manual Focus Nikon Glass
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saph
Registered: Jun 10, 2012
Total Posts: 3699
Country: United States

Leighton, tremendous story about your taking up farming, very inspiring!



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12618
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
Welcome David and a lovely photo to introduce yourself. Glad to have you aboard, but I have to warn you that these lenses are highly addictive

leighton w wrote:
Welcome David! Join right in to the conversation as well. I hope you guard your wallet!

davidthejr wrote:
Wow! Two people telling me to keep an eye on my money! Must be serious!
Thanks for the welcome and I'll be sure to keep my wallet close!

Socalpicman wrote:
No one gave me such a warning....

Too late now

JD


Maybe we sensed you had money to burn JD.



saph
Registered: Jun 10, 2012
Total Posts: 3699
Country: United States

I guess we have to wait then to see that egret image RM

What I am amazed at is you and a few other folk using film. The digitial world has us spoiled rotten, I can't imagine taking a picture of an egret and getting the exposure right using film. But someday given enough time, I might just give film a shot.

BTW, I did insist on manual transmissions until a few years ago when I injured that particular knee and needed surgery. Its healed enough now that someday I may go back to the joy of shifting gears.

When I first got my first DSLR about 6-7 or so years ago (D50), it took me just 2-3 weeks before I gave up on the auto everything setting and started trying out "M". With the AF lenses I learned to work manual focus for shots like birds in a middle of foliage or a spider web. So the retrogressive evolution towards these manual lenses was just normal progression


rattymouse wrote:
Zichar wrote:
Amazing story RM. I don't have the time to reply at length now ... but you. must. show. us. the. picture.
Even if in digital form


Wish I could...but it's back in Chicago, not with us at the moment.




leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12618
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:
Good morning All!

A turn of events on the drive in to work this morning (not me driving) caused me to recall an event earlier in life which has put me in the mode to write. Since this is my chosen forum for all things photographic, I hope this is of interest to some and if the muse strikes to reply, I'll be interested in your take on this.

While riding into work today we passed a farm field that had a dozen or so egrets standing around. I was wish that I could stop and take a photo here but as usual, we just drove on, no one else noticing all those beautiful birds.

This caused me to remember an event long ago, at the very beginning of my journey into the world of photography. Around 1994 or so i am thinking, I bought a Canon Rebel XT and and grew a collection of various lenses. One day, as I drove past my work place to fuel up my car, I went buy a small retention pond. In that pond were some full size egrets (hence the connection to today's ride in). They were quite large, and the retention pond had a totally natural look to it, very very beautiful. I made it a point to one day come back there early in the morning with my camera and 300mm telephoto. I did so, coming in on a Saturday morning, just before sunrise and sure enough, there were 2 egrets in the pond, standing amongst the reeds. My extreme enthusiasm immediately scared off one of the birds which was stupid of me. The other one remained and I calmed down and began to work the scene. I did a decent job and left with 36 exposures in the can.

When I got the film back, I was stunned to see an absolutely beautiful image! I caught the egret in a perfect pose, neck bent, and a mirror image reelection in the water. All surrounded by gorgeous green foliage. I immediately ordered a larger print.

Now at the time I had a good friend, a pen pal, whom I had been writing to for several years. She was a student in England and we hooked up on a bulletin board after I learned how to use email. Back then there was no commercial internet access. The words .com werent common and to send emails you had to know a fair amount of UNIX commands. Once I graduated, I scrambled to find a way to keep email access, even stealing unused university accounts until i found a place that was starting to sell internet access. Anyway, my pen pal and I wrote hundreds of letters and emails over the years and I decided to send her a copy of this print. In fact, I went to this pond to make this photograph for this sole purpose.

Needless to say, she LOOOVED this image and still has it today.

After 6 years of writing to each other, I married my penpal and she has been my wife for the past 16 years. After she graduated, she moved to Hong Kong and invited me over to visit. I said yes, and off I was to travel, never having left the US before. We never spoke to each other even once until the day before I left. It was a 100% pen pal relationship. Not even slightly romantic, I dared not dream of such silliness as marrying her. It was too bizarre to contemplate. After that 1st visit, we realized that we were made for each other and so spent the next year working out the best way end the separation.

Getting back to photography, the whole point of this essay is to muse about the state of the print today. If the situation above were to happen today, I'd be emailing her a jpeg file of the egret photograph that I made.

I contemplate, would getting an email of an image have had the same impact as opening up an envelope and pulling out an 11 x 14 print?

I dont think so.

There's something very different about holding a print in your hand and I have always considered my finest images unfinished until I held them in my hand.

While you can certainly print digital images (i have spend enormous money on inkjet ink), most people just dont print anymore. With film you had to print and early on in in digital photography i think a people printed more than they do today. From looking at the available high quality photo printers, the number of options seems to have dropped dramatically.

Right now I have a nebulous existence. I dont want to buy an inkjet printer here in China so rarely see my images in print. My film negatives are being stored up for when I can own and operate my own dark room, so my film images remain unprinted. As a result, I find photography right now distinctly unsatisfying in this area. Screen viewing just doesnt cut it by a long shot and to me, photography has lost something in this modern world.

Again, if you have thoughts on this, I'd love to read them.

Sorry for the length of this post. Hope it is appropriate for the thread.



Great story RM. What an interesting way to meet your future wife.

As far as printing...I somewhat agree with you but I think you can be just as equally satisfied in the digital age. I stopped printing at home because of the cost to get quality prints. I send all that I wish to print now to Mpix. They're cheap and fast. They also do quality work. John's idea about the photo books is another great idea. There's also blogging. My wife has a farm blog with hundreds of images from her and me in the posts. With over 500 posts now it will be around for our kids, and our grandchildren to enjoy for years to come.

Anyway, just my two cents added.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12618
Country: United States

Peter Z. - The last one is very nice.

Steve - Hope you intentionally increased saturation, because that barley looks mighty green!

Thanks Samy.



sbarricklow
Registered: Jan 14, 2003
Total Posts: 2132
Country: United States

Texas Wheat - 105 mm f1.8 AIS and Fuji Velvia



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

^outstanding work with Velvia.



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
Great story RM. What an interesting way to meet your future wife.

As far as printing...I somewhat agree with you but I think you can be just as equally satisfied in the digital age. I stopped printing at home because of the cost to get quality prints. I send all that I wish to print now to Mpix. They're cheap and fast. They also do quality work. John's idea about the photo books is another great idea. There's also blogging. My wife has a farm blog with hundreds of images from her and me in the posts. With over 500 posts now it will be around for our kids, and our grandchildren to enjoy for years to come.

Anyway, just my two cents added.


Hi Leighton, I did not mean to indicate that one could not get good prints digitally. I printed an enormous amount of my digital images when back in the US. I had boxes of ink coming to me from Amazon almost weekly! Nor did I mean that you have to print your own images to be satisfied. Obviously back then, I never printed my film images myself!

I just think that something is lost when so many images never get put down on paper, as my story above may have shown. (I just dont think my pen pal at the time would have held that photo so close to her heart had I just emailed it to her.) I do not discount blogging, showing our images here, or other on-screen ways. It just seems to me that the print has gotten the short end of the stick.

Do we even print 2% of our images now??



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

Film is difficult in some areas, but exposure is not one of them (unless you shoot slide film). Negative film has an ENORMOUS amount of dynamic range, barely equaled today by digital. It is very very hard to blow highlights using film. So I would not worry too much about exposure. But you do have to be good in tricky situations since you have no instant feedback to let you know how you did. That's the hard part.

Film's a gas. I love the slow working of it all. Manual focus, manual exposure setting, manual film advance, it just doenst get slower than that. I love it.



saph wrote:
I guess we have to wait then to see that egret image RM

What I am amazed at is you and a few other folk using film. The digitial world has us spoiled rotten, I can't imagine taking a picture of an egret and getting the exposure right using film. But someday given enough time, I might just give film a shot.

BTW, I did insist on manual transmissions until a few years ago when I injured that particular knee and needed surgery. Its healed enough now that someday I may go back to the joy of shifting gears.

When I first got my first DSLR about 6-7 or so years ago (D50), it took me just 2-3 weeks before I gave up on the auto everything setting and started trying out "M". With the AF lenses I learned to work manual focus for shots like birds in a middle of foliage or a spider web. So the retrogressive evolution towards these manual lenses was just normal progression


rattymouse wrote:
Zichar wrote:
Amazing story RM. I don't have the time to reply at length now ... but you. must. show. us. the. picture.
Even if in digital form


Wish I could...but it's back in Chicago, not with us at the moment.





rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

A fashion show during the heat of the summer, around 104 F this day. 24mm f/2 ais w/Kodak Ektar film









Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4209
Country: South Africa

rattymouse wrote:
jhinkey wrote:



Great story.

As far as printing goes, I don't print that much either, BUT what we do in my family is put together photo books of our family and my landscape images for our immediate family. I find that satisfying to see them in print (we use Shutterfly) in a book.

John


That's another good point that I meant to bring up. My wife and I review our printed photographs, kept in albums, now up to 6 very large volumes, but we never, ever, EVER review anything on the computer. I have 32,000 images on the computer and all the ever do is sit there, unlooked at. If it is not printed, in my household, it never gets looked at besides the first time it seems.

Thanks for the reply.


Tom - wonderful story and very illustrative of changing times too. I think (speaking as an old f**t) that those of us who grew up with film and went through the entire process of shooting, developing, enlarging and printing B&W's or finding decent labs that could properly process colour film tend to approach photography differently from the younger people who have fully embraced modern technology using any image capture device available.

I find the sharing via say, facebook, very refreshing as it keeps friends in touch visually as well as verbally but I don't have the inclination to show my life to the entire world.

I have happily moved from film to digital because I have no interest in wet processing and the lousy quality fo commercial processors where i live puts me off completely. However as in your case the downside is that my computer is full of images that i don't look at and those that should be deleted clutter up the space.

With good discipline I could make decent digital albums that could be viewed on my TV set where the result would be as satisfying, to me, as a conventional album but the key word is discipline.




georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

Tom, that's an interesting discussion you've started. Your story is almost Hollywood-stuff ;-) More seriously, I rarely print (or have printed) personal images. A really nice Leica-enlarger is collecting dust on the attic, I don't have the room to set it up properly now (hate temporary darkroom-solutions). Sometimes I fear I have lost the feel for proper B&W, too much play with digital files converted to monochrome with the fantastic SilverEfex-plugin.
Anyway, from time to time I have prints digitally done on "real photopaper" as gifts for friends and family. Sharing images online here or at flickr is a nice way to share my passion for photography with others from all over the world.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12618
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
Great story RM. What an interesting way to meet your future wife.

As far as printing...I somewhat agree with you but I think you can be just as equally satisfied in the digital age. I stopped printing at home because of the cost to get quality prints. I send all that I wish to print now to Mpix. They're cheap and fast. They also do quality work. John's idea about the photo books is another great idea. There's also blogging. My wife has a farm blog with hundreds of images from her and me in the posts. With over 500 posts now it will be around for our kids, and our grandchildren to enjoy for years to come.

Anyway, just my two cents added.

rattymouse wrote:
Hi Leighton, I did not mean to indicate that one could not get good prints digitally. I printed an enormous amount of my digital images when back in the US. I had boxes of ink coming to me from Amazon almost weekly! Nor did I mean that you have to print your own images to be satisfied. Obviously back then, I never printed my film images myself!

I just think that something is lost when so many images never get put down on paper, as my story above may have shown. (I just dont think my pen pal at the time would have held that photo so close to her heart had I just emailed it to her.) I do not discount blogging, showing our images here, or other on-screen ways. It just seems to me that the print has gotten the short end of the stick.

Do we even print 2% of our images now??


I understand what you're saying and I think prints are very special. I also believe it meant much more to your wife than an emailed image. However, back in my film days I hardly ever paid for an enlargement, I mostly just got the standard 4x6 prints. They would just end up in the shoebox and hardly ever be looked at again. The only prints I have made today are LARGE ones worthy of the wall, all the rest I share on-line and enjoy sharing them with others, sort of hard to do if the 4x6 prints are stuffed in the closet somewhere. There's also something about seeing these digital files on a big 27' monitor.

This is a very interesting discussion, but it comes down to different strokes for different folks.



Socalpicman
Registered: Aug 07, 2013
Total Posts: 156
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
MDoc9523 wrote:
Welcome David and a lovely photo to introduce yourself. Glad to have you aboard, but I have to warn you that these lenses are highly addictive

leighton w wrote:
Welcome David! Join right in to the conversation as well. I hope you guard your wallet!

davidthejr wrote:
Wow! Two people telling me to keep an eye on my money! Must be serious!
Thanks for the welcome and I'll be sure to keep my wallet close!

Socalpicman wrote:
No one gave me such a warning....

Too late now

JD


Maybe we sensed you had money to burn JD.


,
This disease would solve that problem wouldn't it
I'm really enjoying the 28 2.8, hopefully will find the same enjoyment from a couple of the new lens's when they arrive.

With all the great shots of Wheat and Barley is making me want to do brew a batch of beer and I haven't done that for a few years now.
Great macro shots all, I have always appreciated looking at them for the great detail and skill it takes. I tried years ago in film but I didn't seem to have the skill. Will try again sometime with some of lens with macro I'm getting in and then I tubes also. With our dry climate I just need to find the bugs and interesting flowers.

JD



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

Thanks for the feedback folks! I sort of regretted posting my little story this morning, because it had nothing to do with Nikon manual focus lenses. It was a bit more philosophical than that, but I'm glad the reception has been positive. I appreciate the replies. Off to bed now!



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 3003
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:vFilm's a gas. I love the slow working of it all. Manual focus, manual exposure setting, manual film advance, it just doenst get slower than that. I love it.


that slow thing has very little to do with film itself. the last time I shot film I carried two EOS 1n with booster and usually went through 20-30 rolls per day, all on aperture preferred auto with AF lenses set to AF half the time. With auto film reload with auto-rewind and automatic ISO recognition. Basically, only every 36 frames it was a few seconds of delay before I was back on the button.

It's really how you choose to use a tool. I spend far more time on each shot now than I did back in those days when time pressures forced you to fire off as many shots as you could to have something in the bag at the end of an event (no chimping on film = shoot more).

It seems that the more time I have for a shoot, the more I enjoy it. The setup and preparation of my recent fish tank shots for example were a great day of shooting, even though I only generated a dozen or so usable images - the whole process becomes the extended process of taking a photo. In a way, going on a 2 week hike with the camera turns the hike itself into part of the picture taking process, and at least for me it always is a good part of the reason for going.

The slowest camera I recall using was a 4x5 view camera in college when we had a studio assignment with it, had only 3 sheets of film, and needed to learn everything about perspective correction and depth of field in those three shots. 35mm film in a motor drive camera is a race car compared to that thing



Ronny Olsson
Registered: Jun 24, 2012
Total Posts: 5063
Country: Sweden

One more ;-)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-Fisheye-Nikkor-16-mm-F-3-5-Ai-Lens-with-Front-and-Rear-Caps-Excellent/261273577641?_trksid=p2047675.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D11%26meid%3D888561673938714672%26pid%3D100011%26prg%3D1005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D3%26sd%3D221270906074%26



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

Or this one

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-Fisheye-Nikkor-16-mm-F-3-5-Ai-Lens/400561986267?rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D261%26meid%3D888998237400646818%26pid%3D100005%26prg%3D1088%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D3%26sd%3D261273577641%26



rankamateur
Registered: Nov 25, 2007
Total Posts: 877
Country: United States

Ronny _Olsson wrote:
One more ;-)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-Fisheye-Nikkor-16-mm-F-3-5-Ai-Lens-with-Front-and-Rear-Caps-Excellent/261273577641?_trksid=p2047675.m1850&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D11%26meid%3D888561673938714672%26pid%3D100011%26prg%3D1005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D3%26sd%3D221270906074%26


Ronny you should get this one so we can see pictures taken with it.. It is on sale, down from $99,000 to $94,500
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Nikon-6mm-f-2-8-Nikkor-AI-Fisheye-Lens-VERY-RARE-/331004988399?pt=Camera_Lenses&hash=item4d116f4bef



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5639
Country: United States

sbarricklow wrote:
Salvia blossoms and Garlic Chives shot with a 50 to 135 mm zoom.



Very nice Sam. Nice saturated colors.



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