Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/3058

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georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

kwoodard wrote:
So many pictures taken with the 55/1.2 in the last couple of days. I found that my Macro 55/3.5 Non-AI can mount to my D7000 (with some finesse and care) and I REALLY like that focal length (which gets me very close to 85mm on Dx). I have been shopping around for a 1.2, I think that the 55 might be the one for me. Anyone have a line on an ugly one with good glass?


Kevin, discouraging a fellow photographer is the last thing I wanna do, but I've found nailing focus with the 50/1.2 and 55/1.2 to be very difficult with the D7000. The focus-aid arrows are usually blinking wildly. For "live-subjects" I like to use focus-bracketing: I just turn slowly the focus-ring while "firing" away. For static subjects the magnified Live-View works great to nail focus.



deang001
Registered: Apr 23, 2011
Total Posts: 1793
Country: China

mp356 wrote:
Happy Birthday everyone!







Scott


Great shot Scott !!


rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
So many pictures taken with the 55/1.2 in the last couple of days. I found that my Macro 55/3.5 Non-AI can mount to my D7000 (with some finesse and care) and I REALLY like that focal length (which gets me very close to 85mm on Dx). I have been shopping around for a 1.2, I think that the 55 might be the one for me. Anyone have a line on an ugly one with good glass?


Kevin, discouraging a fellow photographer is the last thing I wanna do, but I've found nailing focus with the 50/1.2 and 55/1.2 to be very difficult with the D7000. The focus-aid arrows are usually blinking wildly. For "live-subjects" I like to use focus-bracketing: I just turn slowly the focus-ring while "firing" away. For static subjects the magnified Live-View works great to nail focus.


Absolutely agree with this. Crop sensors, poor focus screens, and f/1.2 makes for some very frustrating moments.



deang001
Registered: Apr 23, 2011
Total Posts: 1793
Country: China

pburke wrote:
Two with a lens I bought because of this tread - still one of my favorites:

55mm Nikkor-S f/1.2 AI'd on D600, polarizer, handheld at Bodie State Historical Park in CA a few days ago

f/5.6 1/80s ISO 100

f/1.2 1/1600s ISO 100









Both great shots, but the second one I really like - almost looks like a painting ... something 1.2 can do now and then.

Very nice.


pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 3003
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
So many pictures taken with the 55/1.2 in the last couple of days. I found that my Macro 55/3.5 Non-AI can mount to my D7000 (with some finesse and care) and I REALLY like that focal length (which gets me very close to 85mm on Dx). I have been shopping around for a 1.2, I think that the 55 might be the one for me. Anyone have a line on an ugly one with good glass?


Kevin, discouraging a fellow photographer is the last thing I wanna do, but I've found nailing focus with the 50/1.2 and 55/1.2 to be very difficult with the D7000. The focus-aid arrows are usually blinking wildly. For "live-subjects" I like to use focus-bracketing: I just turn slowly the focus-ring while "firing" away. For static subjects the magnified Live-View works great to nail focus.


I use the "lean your body" focus bracketing and fire away with the 55mm - even on the D600 it is hard to see where the thing actually focuses. Sometimes I get lucky with the arrows (church shot above), other times it's just a matter of shooting a lot of them while moving your body a few inches closer or away from the subject. I have been too lazy to try to calibrate the lens doing the "dot tune" for the MF lens. Should work the same way as for AF lenses and maybe get better results. I know that up close, if I trust the indicator, I am usually off by a few inches.



deang001
Registered: Apr 23, 2011
Total Posts: 1793
Country: China

leighton w wrote:
One more from here on the hill around the appointed time. Taken with the 28/2.8 AI-s which doesn't find it's way on my camera very often. Looks like our grapes are ready to harvest.


28/2.8 AIS by Leighton W, on Flickr




Brilliant shot, Leighton.

I'm similar to you in that 28mm doesn't get mounted enough on my camera enough.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4677
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:
georgms wrote:
kwoodard wrote:
So many pictures taken with the 55/1.2 in the last couple of days. I found that my Macro 55/3.5 Non-AI can mount to my D7000 (with some finesse and care) and I REALLY like that focal length (which gets me very close to 85mm on Dx). I have been shopping around for a 1.2, I think that the 55 might be the one for me. Anyone have a line on an ugly one with good glass?


Kevin, discouraging a fellow photographer is the last thing I wanna do, but I've found nailing focus with the 50/1.2 and 55/1.2 to be very difficult with the D7000. The focus-aid arrows are usually blinking wildly. For "live-subjects" I like to use focus-bracketing: I just turn slowly the focus-ring while "firing" away. For static subjects the magnified Live-View works great to nail focus.


Absolutely agree with this. Crop sensors, poor focus screens, and f/1.2 makes for some very frustrating moments.



I like a challenge and I won't always be on a Dx... As to when I can upgrade to Fx is up in the air. Is it much harder than nailing focus on a 50/1.8 wide open? I can do that nearly all the time with my D7000, just my composition and exposure usually need work.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

Kevin, yes to your question, I would say so. After my last reply I've tried some informal candid portraits (D7k+50/1.2) and failed big time, even focus bracketing didn't worked (gaps to large)...

edit: a 55/1.2 should work perfect on "Harold", btw ;-)



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 3003
Country: United States

55mm f1.2, the perfect news photographer lens - mostly it works just as well as a f/1.8 for "f8 and be there" moments, and when you want to get artsy, you dial it down to f/2.0 or faster and hope you get things in focus that matter

Fire over Bodie, D600, Polarizer

f/8.0 1/125s ISO 100







Shot at f/1.2 you sometimes get lucky at medium range and something is in focus - but what matters more to me his how this lens renders at those aperture values. Tourists at Bodie - f/1.2 1/2500s ISO 100







kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4677
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
Kevin, yes to your question, I would say so. After my last reply I've tried some informal candid portraits (D7k+50/1.2) and failed big time, even focus bracketing didn't worked (gaps to large)...

edit: a 55/1.2 should work perfect on "Harold", btw ;-)


I know! Lately I have been putting all my lenses on Harold to see how it looks and feels and peering through the viewfinder. I cannot wait to run some film through it. Only thing that is holding me back is the cost of film locally... $8 for a roll of Ilford HP5 400 and I think its 24 exp. Getting the film developed makes each roll a $20+ tax proposition.

One of the techniques I use with my 1.8 (and my 50/1.4 K when I use an M2 tube) is to set my focus at f/2.8~5.6, then open it up all the way and seem to do pretty well. Not ideal, but I would still love to get one.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4677
Country: United States

pburke wrote:
55mm f1.2, the perfect news photographer lens - mostly it works just as well as a f/1.8 for "f8 and be there" moments, and when you want to get artsy, you dial it down to f/2.0 or faster and hope you get things in focus that matter

Fire over Bodie, D600, Polarizer

f/8.0 1/125s ISO 100







Shot at f/1.2 you sometimes get lucky at medium range and something is in focus - but what matters more to me his how this lens renders at those aperture values. Tourists at Bodie - f/1.2 1/2500s ISO 100







What kind of polarizer are you using, linear or circular? Those shots above I love! I love the classic rendering that these older scalloped lenses do.


pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 3003
Country: United States

I use both kinds of polarizers. Above it's linear, because that's what I bought on ebay for the 52mm diameter not paying attention to linear or circular. I tend to get some underexposed images from time to time with the linear polarizer, especially when on the 20mm lens.

Thing about the rendering - the more to the edge of the frame, the more extreme it gets (see wall in image above). On DX you'll lose all that nice stuff.

Lots of chroma issues at f/1.2 - the white watch of the person in the center had a rather large purple halo around it - needed about 50% slider on de-fringe to get rid of the purple, but it left a grayscale margin around it. Look at full res version to see that



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 3287
Country: Brazil

Happy anniversary everyone, specially to the "big boss" and Devil's adjutant, Curtis
I was involved by this amazing thread at mid 2011, reading some 3-5 pages each night, until I defeated my natural shyness and posted my first images near the end of 2011.
My main subjects are birds, but I also love to experiment several other subjects as landscapes, macros and bokeh playing (Curtis again the main culprit! ); and this thread is an excellent source to learn with so many talented photogs.

This is my humble contribution: telephoto lens porn!
Unfortunatelly I had no time to shot at 12:43h over here, just tonight I managed to capture my 3 most beloved MF lenses (for birding):


Hoods not extended, "dorsal view":


Manual Focus birding lenses, hoods not extended. by labecoaves, on Flickr



Hoods fully extended, lateral view includind the feet:


Manual Focus birding lenses, hoods fully extended. by labecoaves, on Flickr

Left to right:
Nikkor 400mm f/5.6 K factory ai'd ED non-IF; Nikkor 600mm f/5.6 AI-S IF-ED; Nikkor 800mm f/5.6 AI-S IF-ED.
Taken with D600 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 AI-S hand held, ISO 500, f/2 at 1/60s, flash + diffuser.
Far from the best background (my library), but anyway this is my humble contribution.

To follow I will repost some of my best bird shots with each one of these lenses.



James Markus
Registered: Jul 20, 2005
Total Posts: 4801
Country: United States


Happy three year anniversary Curtis, and everyone!

I missed all the cherries on my two cherry trees this year. The birds stripped them in less than one day. So, I checked my peach tree about five days ago, and the fruit was small, hard, and green. It rained last night...and I swear they almost doubled in size over night. In fact, about 60-70% of them pushed themselves right off the neighboring fruit clusters right onto the ground. I threw a wheel barrow full away...but I got about two bushels!

Nikkor 20mm f2.8 ais





.


georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

While looking for example of portraits taken with the 1.2's I've stumbled across this one, taken with the 50/1.4 ("S" or "SC", I don't recall which one) wide open.
Lots of shots with very fast lenses that look okay are not focused 100 percent perfect. With a bit of sharpening it was useable.

excited girl, she won an unicorn in the proper colors at the fair - D700, 50/1.4 wide open, 1/8000sec
Removing the longitudinal CA's in the foreground (the magenta loCa's) was impossible within ACR, it would damage the pink clothing.



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 8403
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
jhinkey wrote:
I won't have anything great to show for today's 3 yr anniversary of this thread.
My first post to the thread was page 7, my first image post was page 9 I believe and this was that image:


50/1.2 AI hand held on a D300 (wow that seemed like an eternity since I owned that camera!)

Here's to at least 3 more years!

John


John, you have been here from the beginning showing your wonderful images. You have been an inspiration to me and I know others. I've very much enjoyed seeing your two girls grow up right before our eyes.
I'd love to see a repeat of this scene taken with you D800, I bet the detail would be amazing.


Thanks Leighton -

I feel lately that I'm at best a small part-time participant with this thread and really it's contributors like you that keep it going strong. I have really enjoyed both the regular contributors and the more recent participants.

The strength of this thread is that it's not a common image subject matter (like landscapes, portraits, people, B&W, etc.) but a common set of gear capable of making most any kind of great image. Thus it always stays interesting, particularly with the around the world participation.

I may someday make that image again, though I doubt the circumstances will arise again since I was on my way back from the playground with my girls - we don't do playgrounds anymore it seems so the 50/1.2 is actually on the selling block (gasp!) and I don't get by that location at that time of the night anymore. Change is inevitable (but that's not necessarily bad most times) and allows one to explore new things.

- John



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

James, those peaches look so good in your shot, I could almost bite into the display...

Jose, wow, love those cannons. Your "humble contribution" is rather a "Hubble-contribution". Way to go ;-)



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 8403
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
While looking for example of portraits taken with the 1.2's I've stumbled across this one, taken with the 50/1.4 ("S" or "SC", I don't recall which one) wide open.
Lots of shots with very fast lenses that look okay are not focused 100 percent perfect. With a bit of sharpening it was useable.
excited girl, she won an unicorn in the proper colors at the fair - D700, 50/1.4 wide open, 1/8000sec
Removing the longitudinal CA's in the foreground (the magenta loCa's) was impossible within ACR, it would damage the pink clothing.


With these old fast Nikkors the phase detection system can't handle the residual spherical aberrations and thus is very unreliable to nail the focus - especially on DX bodies. High pixel count sensors aggravates the issue further. What I've had to do is learn what my fast lens calibrations are so that I know approx. how far off the focus confirmation dot needs to be to get a reasonable focus. For my D800 that means the focus confirmation dot just needs to be flickering on coming from the near side.

I still think Nikon could implement the focus confirmation system much better on the current crop of DSLRs - I await the day that there is an FX mirrorless so I can actually see the image being recorded by the sensor when using my fast MF glass. AF glass will be that much more accurate/reliable as well when that day comes.



DTOB
Registered: Oct 07, 2010
Total Posts: 1359
Country: Canada

jhinkey wrote:
georgms wrote:
While looking for example of portraits taken with the 1.2's I've stumbled across this one, taken with the 50/1.4 ("S" or "SC", I don't recall which one) wide open.
Lots of shots with very fast lenses that look okay are not focused 100 percent perfect. With a bit of sharpening it was useable.
excited girl, she won an unicorn in the proper colors at the fair - D700, 50/1.4 wide open, 1/8000sec
Removing the longitudinal CA's in the foreground (the magenta loCa's) was impossible within ACR, it would damage the pink clothing.


With these old fast Nikkors the phase detection system can't handle the residual spherical aberrations and thus is very unreliable to nail the focus - especially on DX bodies. High pixel count sensors aggravates the issue further. What I've had to do is learn what my fast lens calibrations are so that I know approx. how far off the focus confirmation dot needs to be to get a reasonable focus. For my D800 that means the focus confirmation dot just needs to be flickering on coming from the near side.

I still think Nikon could implement the focus confirmation system much better on the current crop of DSLRs - I await the day that there is an FX mirrorless so I can actually see the image being recorded by the sensor when using my fast MF glass. AF glass will be that much more accurate/reliable as well when that day comes.


I've solved all of this by replacing my screen. I rarely look for the dot.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5639
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
One more from here on the hill around the appointed time. Taken with the 28/2.8 AI-s which doesn't find it's way on my camera very often. Looks like our grapes are ready to harvest.


28/2.8 AIS by Leighton W, on Flickr



Love this composition Leighton. Happy anniversary!



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