Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/3046

1       2       3              3046      
3047
       3048              5891       5892       end

MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
some fisheye-fun on film:


Gedser von georgsfoto auf Flickr
FM2 + 16/3.5, don't recall which of the built-in filters I've used, maybe the orange one
expired Rollei Retro 100 (a.k.a. Agfa APX 100) at Ei200 in Diafine


Georg you have been knocking them out of the park. Very nice work!



James Markus
Registered: Jul 20, 2005
Total Posts: 4801
Country: United States

Plum to Prune ...






StonePhotog
Registered: Apr 23, 2013
Total Posts: 134
Country: United States

Those boat pictures are fantastic Georg!

And that's a really fun "Plum to Prune" picture James.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

James, love the plum to prune shot: what a great idea!

Ray and Jay: thank you for your kind words!



DTOB
Registered: Oct 07, 2010
Total Posts: 1359
Country: Canada

Everyone needs a 16mm.


DSC_0526 by DEETEEOHBEE, on Flickr



NightOwl Cat
Registered: Feb 19, 2007
Total Posts: 9319
Country: United States

And it caused me to hit play on my copy of it. I think I still have the vinyl version around here too I don't know if I could limit myself to "JUST" 25 CD's though... Maybe fitting them all on ipod classics (160GB), I could get things down to about 5 or 6 of them

love the bokeh Jose.

asiostygius wrote:

A humble homage to the 40 years (this year) of the magnificent Pink Floyd album:


Homage to the 40 years of The Dark Side of the Moon by labecoaves, on Flickr

This is one of those 25 CDs to bring with you to a desert island
D600 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.8 K ai'd & CPU'd + 4T close up lens + tripod, ISO 640, f/2 at 1/30s. ~10% cropped. The close up lens allowed a ~0.4m or less of minimum focusing distance.





Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 442
Country: Netherlands

In the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, I got carried away by the light in the curtains...


_PG20498 by Apapa56, on Flickr

Nikkor 28mm 2.8 ais at f8, 1/160 sec iso 280 on D700



NightOwl Cat
Registered: Feb 19, 2007
Total Posts: 9319
Country: United States

Newly restored carousel? Wicked nice, Leighton


leighton w wrote:
One from the fair with the 50/1.2 @ f2.


2013RCF 50/1.2 AIS by Leighton W, on Flickr



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

^^^^^^^^^
I agree Dylan. I love my 16mm 3.5





Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 442
Country: Netherlands

Sony Center at Potsdamer Platz, Berlin


_PG20575 by Apapa56, on Flickr

50mm 1.2 ais at f8.0, 1/320sec iso 200 on D700



Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 442
Country: Netherlands

Another one from Sony Center, Potsdamer Platz, Berlin


_PG20573 by Apapa56, on Flickr

Nikkor 50mm 1,2 ais at f8.0 1/160 sec iso 280 on a D700



Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 442
Country: Netherlands

To stay in the blue tones, a cloudscape between Berlin and Amsterdam


_PG20584 by Apapa56, on Flickr

Nikkor 50mm 1.2 ais at f11 1/640 sec iso 200 on a D700



raboof
Registered: Mar 04, 2011
Total Posts: 2094
Country: United States

Wow Ray. That second shot is very nice.



Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 442
Country: Netherlands

To dizzy some more, more from Potsdamer Platz, Berlin


_PG20564 by Apapa56, on Flickr

Nikkor 20mm f3.5 at f11, 1/160 sec iso 250 on D700


_PG20558 by Apapa56, on Flickr

Nikkor 20mm f3.5 at f11 1/160 sec iso 200 on d D700



raboof
Registered: Mar 04, 2011
Total Posts: 2094
Country: United States

One more shot of "Rapunzel." These were shot as JPEG so it was quite difficult to work with especially it was about two stops underexposed. I had to go with B&W and added grain.






135mm f2.0 AI


James Markus
Registered: Jul 20, 2005
Total Posts: 4801
Country: United States

Looks great to me, Chuong!



rolubich
Registered: Jun 11, 2012
Total Posts: 195
Country: Italy

Leighton, this

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/929565/3178#11752569

is really a good picture!

50mm f/1.2 contrast is excellent @ f/2, great aperture choice.

And thank you (to George, Philippe and Jeff too) for your kind comment on my picture some pages ago.



rolubich
Registered: Jun 11, 2012
Total Posts: 195
Country: Italy

Wow John, I like this one

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/929565/3179#11752810

even more than the first one!

Great light and composition (and PP?).



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

rattymouse wrote:
CGrindahl wrote:
I'm definitely from a different generation... I started listening to that Pink Floyd album Jose highlights and could tolerate only about ten minutes of it. I guess if I'd been smoking something medicinal I could have gotten into it but I'm not and it didn't float my boat. I guess I'm still a Beatles fan... By the seventies when that album came out I was a gainfully employed adult in my thirties more interested in traveling than in rocking out.

The photos are still first rate...


When was the last time you tried listening Curtis? Pink Floyd's Dark Side of the Moon is a towering masterpiece of almost unquantifiable quality. No where else has anyone put down to music the feelings of life, death, and the stresses of one trying to make sense of their tiny life in the grand scheme of the world. Side one of that album, from the first heart beat of "Breathe" (a life is born), all through the end to death in "The Great Gig in the Sky", is an astonishing creative achievement. Absolutely unparalleled.

I used to love that album a lot. Back in 2011, I became seriously ill, to the point where I was being tested for some of the worst diseases imaginable. I was progressively getting worse and worse and I thought my time had come up. Thankfully, whatever I had faded away and I got a new lease on life. Listening to Dark Side of the Moon now is an almost overwhelming experience for me. Being so ill was such a wake up call for me and these lyrics took on a meaning that is immensely powerful, even years later.

You are young and life is long
And there is time to kill today

And then the one day you find
Ten years have got behind you
No one told you when to run
You missed the starting gun




You haven't been around long enough Tom to know that I've done volunteer work for the last 15 years with folks approaching the end of their lives. I'm the volunteer Intake Coordinator for the Living/Dying Project and have shared the journey of many who eventually died. I'm currently working with a fifty year old woman with a nine year old son in the end stage of ALS. I don't need to listen to lyrics of any song on the subject of life's meaning. I explore that subject each week with a person whose journey has been much like yours, though without the relief you appear to have found. She will leave her son and die, likely within the next year.

As Samy's comment suggests, the meaning we find in music changes much as our lives change. I've never liked Bach, but I'm mesmerized by his Cello Sonatas which have been playing on the CD in my car for about four months... without stop. Clearly, I didn't meet Pink Floyd when that music might have spoken to me. Now, it holds no interest for me. I'd much prefer a Tchaikovsky violin concerto or a Beethoven string quartet. I also love Alison Krause and the Union Station... lest anyone believe I'm a snob about such things. I love the Dixie Chicks and Tom Wait and a delicious young woman named Ingrid Michaelson who sells her records independently.

I have deep respect for each of us as we find the support we need during our lives, whether that comes from a tab of acid, music that speaks to our soul or a zafu and a day in a zendo. Different strokes. But to Jose's comment about desert island music, for me it would be Beethoven's string quartets.



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

ALS, absolutely brutal. I flew down to Hong Kong to be tested by a specialist to see if I had ALS. Thankfully I did not. I commend you for your work Curtis.

Beethoven's late string quartets are sublime.



1       2       3              3046      
3047
       3048              5891       5892       end