Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2958

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georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

Ronny _Olsson wrote:
georgms wrote:
Hi Ronny, right now I'm in Simrishamn. Spent a few days over at Sturkö (your frontporch ;-).


Have about 4 mil to Sturkö ..lovely there ! Simrishamn is great to .
Hope to see pictures from there
Have a great holiday


Hej Ronny, takk så mycket!
I was looking for a guy with a majestic dog, a D700 and some fine pieces of MF-optics, but didn't see you ;-)
Was meeting my sister and her kids on Turkö, had a fantastic blåber-glass/icecream in Karlskrona. Should have shot more pictures, will see what I got at home.
You're living in a wonderful part of the world.
Cheers and happy MF-shooting, Georg!



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12618
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
Hi from southern Sweden,
sorry, I'm not able to follow the discussions here. Just had a quick glance at Jose's excellent bird-portraits, other pictures and pages didn't load (extremely sluggish internet-access in the harbour).

Here's a stitch of two in-camera-processed shots with the 28/3.5 PC-Nikkor. Not a fancy subject, just a picture of a neat and quiet little fishing-harbour (I love harbour-scenes).


What do you mean "not a fancy subject"? I LOVE it! It has all the elements that make for a great photo.

Although this is a great image, your sensor is filthy.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4677
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
georgms wrote:
Hi from southern Sweden,
sorry, I'm not able to follow the discussions here. Just had a quick glance at Jose's excellent bird-portraits, other pictures and pages didn't load (extremely sluggish internet-access in the harbour).

Here's a stitch of two in-camera-processed shots with the 28/3.5 PC-Nikkor. Not a fancy subject, just a picture of a neat and quiet little fishing-harbour (I love harbour-scenes).


What do you mean "not a fancy subject"? I LOVE it! It has all the elements that make for a great photo.

Although this is a great image, your sensor is filthy.


+1 on all accounts.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12618
Country: United States

A lot of people think of farm life as being so bucolic, and I've tried to show it that way on this thread. But sometimes it just ain't so. I've posted images of our male Great Pyrenees Jed before. Jed is what is referred to as a "working dog". He and the other dog "Ellie" are vitally important to the operation as they protect our sheep. Without them, we could stand to loose a LOT of money due to predators. Well, we woke up Sunday morning to find Jed dead on the side porch. He's had "health issues" most of his life so this wasn't completely unexpected. So now the search starts for his replacement and if any of you know of a breeder within a few hundred mile radius of the Shenandoah Valley please let me know.


Jed by Leighton W, on Flickr



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

Dogs to deal with predators and cats to keep the mouse population at bay... a working farm. My mother grew up on a farm and hated the fact all the lambs she came to love were eventually slaughtered. We never had lamb served in our home because she couldn't tolerate it.

At the same time I don't doubt that Jed became a bit of a friend even if he was a co-worker rather than simply a pet. This is a great photo Leighton, with Jed's charges standing behind him, whether they are looking at you or him. I guess you had to dig the hole...



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
A lot of people think of farm life as being so bucolic, and I've tried to show it that way on this thread. But sometimes it just ain't so. I've posted images of our male Great Pyrenees Jed before. Jed is what is referred to as a "working dog". He and the other dog "Ellie" are vitally important to the operation as they protect our sheep. Without them, we could stand to loose a LOT of money due to predators. Well, we woke up Sunday morning to find Jed dead on the side porch. He's had "health issues" most of his life so this wasn't completely unexpected. So now the search starts for his replacement and if any of you know of a breeder within a few hundred mile radius of the Shenandoah Valley please let me know.


Jed by Leighton W, on Flickr


Wow....that is one powerful photo. Showing it in monochrome is PERFECT. I seriously doubt color would be right here.



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
............ and cats to keep the mouse population at bay...


Whoa!!



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

So many great photos passing through this thread, it is hard to keep up, as many have said. Always worth checking every page however. I appreciate both the photos and the conversation. Thanks everyone. It is nice to see the thread pretty much takes care of itself with quite a few participants attending to what needs to be said and done. Finally, I was able to do a bit of photography this weekend. I went to the edge of San Francisco Bay on the off chance I'd see some sailboat racing, but there was nothing but fishermen, tourists on bicycle and a few passing tour boats. I mounted the 400 f/5.6 AI-s ED-IF and attached the Manfrotto monopod and took a few photos. Let's start with this fisherman who was working SIX fishing lines at once. I didn't watch long enough to know whether he was having any success. This was converted with Silver Efex Pro. It was an overcast day with fog covering the water and San Francisco. Black and white seemed appropriate.


And a shot across the fishing pier toward Alcatraz.


And standing beneath the Golden Gate bridge I had to take a few photos...



I feel sorry for those folks who spend their summer vacation freezing in San Francisco where they believe a walk across the Golden Gate bridge is a fun thing to do. The views may be inspiring but the noise of passing cars and the chill breeze that comes with fog is certainly not pleasant. These folks are taking in the vista...



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12618
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
Dogs to deal with predators and cats to keep the mouse population at bay... a working farm. My mother grew up on a farm and hated the fact all the lambs she came to love were eventually slaughtered. We never had lamb served in our home because she couldn't tolerate it.

At the same time I don't doubt that Jed became a bit of a friend even if he was a co-worker rather than simply a pet. This is a great photo Leighton, with Jed's charges standing behind him, whether they are looking at you or him. I guess you had to dig the hole...


Thanks Curtis and Tom. Even though Jed was an "employee" he was "somewhat" of a pet as well, although he drove me nuts most of the time. As far as lambs go, by the time they're big enough to slaughter they're not very cute and I have NO problem eating them. And I know our customers have NO problems as well.



bruni
Registered: Feb 15, 2012
Total Posts: 1650
Country: Australia

Oosty wrote:
Super image Ben - where in Sydney was that taken? Is it Kings Cross?



sorry Peter - missed this - yes, it is Kings Cross

ben



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12618
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
So many great photos passing through this thread, it is hard to keep up, as many have said. Always worth checking every page however. I appreciate both the photos and the conversation. Thanks everyone. It is nice to see the thread pretty much takes care of itself with quite a few participants attending to what needs to be said and done. Finally, I was able to do a bit of photography this weekend. I went to the edge of San Francisco Bay on the off chance I'd see some sailboat racing, but there was nothing but fishermen, tourists on bicycle and a few passing tour boats. I mounted the 400 f/5.6 AI-s ED-IF and attached the Manfrotto monopod and took a few photos. Let's start with this fisherman who was working SIX fishing lines at once. I didn't watch long enough to know whether he was having any success. This was converted with Silver Efex Pro. It was an overcast day with fog covering the water and San Francisco. Black and white seemed appropriate.




All nice, but I like this the best because of what appears to be a freighter way off in the distance and just ever so slightly lost in the haze. Nicely seen.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

I vaguely remember someone posting on this thread by the name of Ben... mmm... You're not the Ben who moved to Boston though, are you... mmm.

I guess is smart to hibernate during winter Ben, it happens at the top of the world as well. Your distinctive shooting style is missed, of course. You'll find a number of folks posting at the moment who are doing street photography of the sort you'd likely appreciate. Dylan has returned from the wilds of Winnipeg and Tom has arrived from Shanghai, both shooting film and giving us some great images. And quite a few of us have taken the plunge into Silver Efex Pro 2 now that Google has made the Nik suite available at an affordable price.

Hope you spend a bit of time with us... spring is just around the corner down under. Put those lenses to work...



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
CGrindahl wrote:
So many great photos passing through this thread, it is hard to keep up, as many have said. Always worth checking every page however. I appreciate both the photos and the conversation. Thanks everyone. It is nice to see the thread pretty much takes care of itself with quite a few participants attending to what needs to be said and done. Finally, I was able to do a bit of photography this weekend. I went to the edge of San Francisco Bay on the off chance I'd see some sailboat racing, but there was nothing but fishermen, tourists on bicycle and a few passing tour boats. I mounted the 400 f/5.6 AI-s ED-IF and attached the Manfrotto monopod and took a few photos. Let's start with this fisherman who was working SIX fishing lines at once. I didn't watch long enough to know whether he was having any success. This was converted with Silver Efex Pro. It was an overcast day with fog covering the water and San Francisco. Black and white seemed appropriate.



All nice, but I like this the best because of what appears to be a freighter way off in the distance and just ever so slightly lost in the haze. Nicely seen.


I was about to add a bit of text noting the passing container ship that was stacked with containers probably headed for the Port of Oakland. San Francisco doesn't have the land to back up a container port, so they specialize in cruise ships and Oakland handles everything else.

Here is another passing ship, I mean boat...


Same setup, same treatment.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4677
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:
A lot of people think of farm life as being so bucolic, and I've tried to show it that way on this thread. But sometimes it just ain't so. I've posted images of our male Great Pyrenees Jed before. Jed is what is referred to as a "working dog". He and the other dog "Ellie" are vitally important to the operation as they protect our sheep. Without them, we could stand to loose a LOT of money due to predators. Well, we woke up Sunday morning to find Jed dead on the side porch. He's had "health issues" most of his life so this wasn't completely unexpected. So now the search starts for his replacement and if any of you know of a breeder within a few hundred mile radius of the Shenandoah Valley please let me know.


Jed by Leighton W, on Flickr


Very sorry for your loss. I know how hard it is to lose a family member, working dog or not.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

Of course, what was happening on shore was equally interesting. I was standing next to a path used by bicyclists who had crossed the Golden Gate bridge and were heading for Sausalito. A great many would stop to read about the bridge and take photos of friends with the bridge or San Francisco in the distance. Here are three buddies having a great time.



There is a placard they are reading that tells about the bridge.


All with the 400 on a monopod. I shot everything wide open.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4677
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
Of course, what was happening on shore was equally interesting. I was standing next to a path used by bicyclists who had crossed the Golden Gate bridge and were heading for Sausalito. A great many would stop to read about the bridge and take photos of friends with the bridge or San Francisco in the distance. Here are three buddies having a great time.



There is a placard they are reading that tells about the bridge.


All with the 400 on a monopod. I shot everything wide open.


After seeing these shots with your 400 (which I think are great, I love the added grain on a few of them) I will have to take my 400mm f/6.3 Vivitar out for a spin. This lens is a battle hardened lens, being to every continent on the planet. I think I will get a lot better results from it than I did with the Tamron 500mm f/8 mirror lens that I also have. The reach is great and when you nail focus its awesome, but the bokeh is meh if there is any highlights in the bokeh area (doughnuts) and the DOF even at f/8 is tough to work with.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

What happens, of course, is when one begins picking up the camera, even after a brief hiatus, it becomes easier to do so again. I was pumping gas this afternoon and noticed this scene. I stood at the back of the station on the highest ground available and shot over the intervening street to take these two shots, one only slightly cropped, the second pulling closer to the San Francisco Theological Seminary. I had the 135 f/2.8 Q.C. AI'd mounted.



Added a bit of tint an vignetting to the second image.

This is my hometown...



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

Curtis, that's a great set of B&W-photographs from the bridge. Personal favorite is the third shot for it's "tight and unusual" framing and composition. The 400/5.6 works great, just like the conversion.

Leighton, sorry to hear about your and Barbaras loss! Your shots with the 50/1.2 are great.

Ben, it's great to see you here again. I've missed your work in the last weeks.

Ray, while I've missed most pictures and postings here I could see a wonderful image from the "wetlands" (Everglades?). I'm talking about the shot taken with the 24/2.8 and the railing in the frame. Congrats to your tripod!

Samy, great shot of the rabbit!

Leighton and Kevin, thanks for your comments on the harbour-scene! And yes, the sensor really needs a cleaning :-) Btw, anyone here with experience using "sensor-film" for cleaning?



NightOwl Cat
Registered: Feb 19, 2007
Total Posts: 9304
Country: United States

Leighton, sorry to hear of the loss of Jed. I know you'll miss him greatly no matter what. Sorry I don't know of any breeders though. What sort of dog was he?



rattymouse
Registered: Feb 04, 2006
Total Posts: 7430
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
What happens, of course, is when one begins picking up the camera, even after a brief hiatus, it becomes easier to do so again. I was pumping gas this afternoon and noticed this scene. I stood at the back of the station on the highest ground available and shot over the intervening street to take these two shots, one only slightly cropped, the second pulling closer to the San Francisco Theological Seminary. I had the 135 f/2.8 Q.C. AI'd mounted.



This is my hometown...


Wow...this image is just epic. You were pumping gas at the time?? Hard to believe that there is a fuel station anywhere near a scene like this. It looks sooo isolated!! I love the first image posted here.



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