Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2857

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leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9774
Country: United States

Zichar wrote:
Yay, I'm off work and will be heading to South Australia this Friday. I've been waiting for the longest time! Haven't had a break in almost a year (sorry Leighton). Packing my gear now and it feels soooo heavy. Tempted to leave the 45PCE at home but what can I say, my allegiance is with this thread


PLEASE take me with you!



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9774
Country: United States

I guess we have nothing to worry about with our beloved lenses.

http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Radioactive_lenses



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 13627
Country: United States

There is a 35 f/1.4 Nikkor on that list Leighton... so speak for yourself...

The call it a (early variant with thorium glass elements), whatever that means... But the optical design of these lenses appears to be unchanged from the first C pre-AI version, through the AI-s... Mmm. I used the lens a couple of days ago and suddenly felt sick... mmm.

This from Malaysia...

SUPPLEMENTS: From: Dan Lindsay <Lindsay437@cox.net>
Subject: Nikkor lenses and Thorium Glass
To: Leonard P S Foo <leofoo@mir.com.my>

Do you think there is any interest in a discussion of the use of Thorium glass in Nikkor lenses? Nikon used Thorium glass in the early 35mm f/1.4 to attain higher refraction figures. This was a very common design option in the 1960s and very early 1970s (when the 35mm f/1.4 lens was designed). Evidence of this can be obtained either through the use of a Geiger counter to actually read the radioactivity emitted from the lens or by observing the yellowing of the glass from the aging of the element(s) that contain Thorium. The early versions of the 35mm f/1.4 Nikkor are now over 30 years old and as such they will appear yellow when you view a white piece of paper through them. Should you shoot color slides with such a lens you will get a definite yellow cast to the pictures. They say that the yellow can be bleached out over time by leaving the glass uncovered in bright sunlight for many weeks. (I cannot personally attest to that method). Maybe this could be integrated somewhere on the page that discusses the 35mm f/1.4 Nikkor lens. The current AIS version doesn't employ Thorium glass. Dan Lindsay Santa Barbara



Foggy14
Registered: May 01, 2010
Total Posts: 1137
Country: United States

Here are a couple wide open shots of a flowering coral tree, sometimes called a "flame tree."



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 2155
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
There is a 35 f/1.4 Nikkor on that list Leighton... so speak for yourself...

The call it a (early variant with thorium glass elements), whatever that means... But the optical design of these lenses appears to be unchanged from the first C pre-AI version, through the AI-s... Mmm. I used the lens a couple of days ago and suddenly felt sick... mmm.

This from Malaysia...

SUPPLEMENTS: From: Dan Lindsay <Lindsay437@cox.net>
Subject: Nikkor lenses and Thorium Glass
To: Leonard P S Foo <leofoo@mir.com.my>

Do you think there is any interest in a discussion of the use of Thorium glass in Nikkor lenses? Nikon used Thorium glass in the early 35mm f/1.4 to attain higher refraction figures. This was a very common design option in the 1960s and very early 1970s (when the 35mm f/1.4 lens was designed). Evidence of this can be obtained either through the use of a Geiger counter to actually read the radioactivity emitted from the lens or by observing the yellowing of the glass from the aging of the element(s) that contain Thorium. The early versions of the 35mm f/1.4 Nikkor are now over 30 years old and as such they will appear yellow when you view a white piece of paper through them. Should you shoot color slides with such a lens you will get a definite yellow cast to the pictures. They say that the yellow can be bleached out over time by leaving the glass uncovered in bright sunlight for many weeks. (I cannot personally attest to that method). Maybe this could be integrated somewhere on the page that discusses the 35mm f/1.4 Nikkor lens. The current AIS version doesn't employ Thorium glass. Dan Lindsay Santa Barbara


you can always store them under water to cut down on the radiation - I have a pretty good setup for that.



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 2155
Country: United States

Foggy14 wrote:
Here are a couple wide open shots of a flowering coral tree, sometimes called a "flame tree."




can't wait to get home and try some myself - my 55mm f1.2 just was left at my door by UPS



Foggy14
Registered: May 01, 2010
Total Posts: 1137
Country: United States

pburke wrote:
Foggy14 wrote:
Here are a couple wide open shots of a flowering coral tree, sometimes called a "flame tree."




can't wait to get home and try some myself - my 55mm f1.2 just was left at my door by UPS




leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9774
Country: United States

(early variant with thorium glass elements)

SUPPLEMENTS: From: Dan Lindsay <Lindsay437@cox.net>
Subject: Nikkor lenses and Thorium Glass
To: Leonard P S Foo <leofoo@mir.com.my>

Do you think there is any interest in a discussion of the use of Thorium glass in Nikkor lenses? Nikon used Thorium glass in the early 35mm f/1.4 to attain higher refraction figures. This was a very common design option in the 1960s and very early 1970s (when the 35mm f/1.4 lens was designed). Evidence of this can be obtained either through the use of a Geiger counter to actually read the radioactivity emitted from the lens or by observing the yellowing of the glass from the aging of the element(s) that contain Thorium. The early versions of the 35mm f/1.4 Nikkor are now over 30 years old and as such they will appear yellow when you view a white piece of paper through them. Should you shoot color slides with such a lens you will get a definite yellow cast to the pictures. They say that the yellow can be bleached out over time by leaving the glass uncovered in bright sunlight for many weeks. (I cannot personally attest to that method). Maybe this could be integrated somewhere on the page that discusses the 35mm f/1.4 Nikkor lens. The current AIS version doesn't employ Thorium glass. Dan Lindsay Santa Barbara

CGrindahl wrote:
There is a 35 f/1.4 Nikkor on that list Leighton... so speak for yourself...

The call it a
, whatever that means... But the optical design of these lenses appears to be unchanged from the first C pre-AI version, through the AI-s... Mmm. I used the lens a couple of days ago and suddenly felt sick... mmm.

This from Malaysia...


Yea, I saw that one Nikkor. You did say the other day how you felt sick....



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 9774
Country: United States

Foggy14 wrote:
Here are a couple wide open shots of a flowering coral tree, sometimes called a "flame tree."






I really like this one Jeff. How's your eye doing?


Ronny _Olsson
Registered: Jun 24, 2012
Total Posts: 2590
Country: Sweden

Thanks
Nice shot Ray !
Really good splash-shots Peter
Nice set Ben with Nikki
Love it Jeff.. Great set

Pretty good sharpness with aperture f2.8 100% crop

Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s Vivitar Nikon AT-3/AI Extension Tube 36mm by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr

Nikkor 135mm f/2 Ai-s Vivitar Nikon AT-3/AI Extension Tube 36mm by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr



Foggy14
Registered: May 01, 2010
Total Posts: 1137
Country: United States

leighton w wrote:I really like this one Jeff. How's your eye doing?

Thanks Leighton. The eye is coming along well and I should wrap-up the visits to the specialists in about a month. Can't wait!



bruni
Registered: Feb 15, 2012
Total Posts: 1425
Country: Australia

Thank you for the kind comments everyone.

Georg - I meant they're the last pics of the adventure. Leighton wants to finish off the blog - and rightly so - so I had to do a final post.

Curtis - Phillippe recently forced me to buy the zeiss 85 f1.4 - but that's gathering dust.

That's the problem with a lens addiction - or as you would say: kit building is forever - something has to sit on the shelf while you pursue the next purchase...and the one after that, and the one after that.

ben



Foggy14
Registered: May 01, 2010
Total Posts: 1137
Country: United States

Ronny, thanks for your comment. Terrific bee shot with the 135/2. I'm in awe of your steady hands!



Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 322
Country: Netherlands

The sun in the northwestern France is not as shiny as in California, but here are a couple oldtimer car pictures I took with the 28mm 2.8 ais last week, all on a D700:


_PG26059 by Apapa56, on Flickr

1/200 sec at f8 iso 200

It shows very little moustache distortion at close range:


An English moustache by Apapa56, on Flickr

1/1600 sec f2.8 iso 200

And some more CRC at work, earlier last week in Central France:


_PG25816 by Apapa56, on Flickr

1/1000 sec, f5,6 iso 200 and some shadow lifting in Aperture



Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 322
Country: Netherlands

In Central France I visited the Pont-Canal de Briare, an aquaduct across the Loire river built between 1860 and 1896


_PG25537 by Apapa56, on Flickr

20mm/3.5, 1/160 sec at f8 iso 400, bw conversion with Nik Silver Effex


_PG25573 by Apapa56, on Flickr

20mm/3.5, 1/160 sec at f8 iso 500, bw conversion with Nik Silver Effex


_PG25561 by Apapa56, on Flickr

20mm/3.5 1/160sec at f8 iso 200



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3515
Country: Germany

Ronny, amazing close-ups again! I wonder how many hours do you spend laying in the grass with the Nikon ready in your hands ;-)

Jeff, that's very cool framing on your coral tree shots!

Reagan, I really like the first shot ("infinity sign"). The 28-50 seems to be a neat and versatile lens.

Ben, thanks for the clarification - I was worried a bit ;-)

Peter, congrats! Can't wait to see some massive background blur produced by your new 55/1.2 ;-)

Leighton, sorry, missed the shot with the horses - I've looked at a gallery with strange hats and so
The "real" tilt-shot is remarkable, great and eye-catching work on a subject that has probably been shot from every angle with every lens.



Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 322
Country: Netherlands

Two macros with the 300mm/4.5 EDIF ais


_PG25299 by Apapa56, on Flickr

1/100 f5.6 iso 200 with PN11 and PK13 tubes, hand-held


_PG25939 by Apapa56, on Flickr

1/250 f5.6 iso 200 with PN11 tube and TC14B converter, hand-held and fill flash with built-in flash on D700




georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3515
Country: Germany

Zichar wrote:
Yay, I'm off work and will be heading to South Australia this Friday. I've been waiting for the longest time! Haven't had a break in almost a year (sorry Leighton). Packing my gear now and it feels soooo heavy. Tempted to leave the 45PCE at home but what can I say, my allegiance is with this thread


Chin, I hope you will have a great and restful trip!



Paul Gabel
Registered: Jun 17, 2012
Total Posts: 322
Country: Netherlands

300mm/4.5 EDIF ais does long distance pretty nice too, all with TC14B:


_PG26226 by Apapa56, on Flickr

1/2500 f5.6 iso 200


_PG26219 by Apapa56, on Flickr

1/1000 f5.6 iso 200


_PG26231 by Apapa56, on Flickr

1/1000 f5.6 iso 200



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3515
Country: Germany

Paul, it's great to hear/read from you again. Great work as usual. I especially like the classic B&W-images. The macros are wonderful too - the colors of the flower-shot are excellent.



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