Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2812

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CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 13177
Country: United States

pburke wrote:
pbraymond wrote:

Thanks Kevin. Lenses without CPU's do not transmit focal length, and the camera defaults to a 1/30 target shutter speed. You would think the person that wrote the code to allow non-CPU lens registrations would have talked to the person who wrote the autoISO routine.....


I think your best option with features like this is the "OFF" position. What other than adding noise will it do? I recall how I once messed up a lot of tripod shots in low light, pushing iso to high levels, while I was wondering "wow, there is a lot of light here, I thought this exposure should be a few seconds..." I've used it initialy thinking it would save a few shots, but in the end it had more negative than positive effect on my picture taking. I now make sure it's off, all the time, any lens, and choose my iso manually as needed.


Actually, the best option is to shoot Manual Mode in which you set both aperture at the lens and shutter speed in the camera. Once you've done that Auto ISO will do its thing up to the maximum set, which is by default 6400 on the D700. I play back and forth between Aperture Priority and Manual Mode all day long depending on lighting conditions. Needless to say, shooting with tubes reduces light, so even on bright days, I can shoot wide open with the 300 f/4.5 AI-s ED-IF in Manual Mode so I can keep the shutter speed up to a manageable level.

Auto ISO is a dream. Here is a shot I took in my living room with Nikki, Manual Mode at f/2, 1/60th of a second, that required ISO 360.



jhinkey
Registered: Jan 08, 2010
Total Posts: 6038
Country: United States

Reagan wrote:
Mishu01 wrote:
Some night work in a rainy Bucharest with Noct 58/1.2. Taken from a hotel balcony a few weeks ago.




Well done Mihai I like them all at first I thought Don was back

Reagan


Me too Reagan!



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

Curtis On the D7000 and the D600 you set the minimum ISO and the maximum ISO and the min shutter speed and the camera chooses the ISO. I almost always shoot in auto iso. The only problem I have ever had is when I forget to change the speed based on the different focal length. For the 300 4.5 I usually choose 1/1000 but the 24mm I may only set at 1/100.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 2984
Country: United States

I am in a bit of a conundrum... I have a very bad back, spend most of my days in pain that nothing can really be done about. I love my kit, I finally have it fleshed out about where I want it. It does everything I want and does it well. My problem is its weight. If I go on a trip, I usually take my whole kit (camera, 4 lenses, tripod, flash). My last trip, I was in pain for nearly a week after. My photography is evolving and I am needing less and less gear per outing, but even an afternoon with the D7000 around my neck sporting a 28/2.8 or 50/1.8, I am getting home with pain from the base of my skull to just below my rib cage. This isn't good, has me concerned, even has my doctor concerned. One of my coworkers has an M9 with a 35mm lens on it. Man, felt so nice, and the camera took superb pictures...probably 85% of what I shoot could be shot with it. Now an M9 with the 35mm is WAY out of my price-range. I told my friend this and she said, "This is what you want then..." and tossed me her Fuji X100. Not as sharp/clean as the M9, but at a tenth of the price, I was impressed. Loved its look, took very nice pictures, didn't feel that bad in hand. I may have to sell my DSLR and get one of these. What are your thoughts? Any of you in a similar boat when it comes to the weight of your kit and your body rebelling against it? How do you deal?



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

Kevin just a thought.I too have trouble with the weight so I bought the Black Rapid strap for my camera. It has made a world of difference in the strain on my neck. I can walk all day and not feel the strain at all. I have given thought to getting a couple of small lens cases that have the loops and mounting them on my belt. I think that this might be better than all of the weight in one bag. You could try a mono-pod instead of a tripod then it can double as a walking stick. Now I make myself choose max 3 lenses.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 13177
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
Curtis On the D7000 and the D600 you set the minimum ISO and the maximum ISO and the min shutter speed and the camera chooses the ISO. I almost always shoot in auto iso. The only problem I have ever had is when I forget to change the speed based on the different focal length. For the 300 4.5 I usually choose 1/1000 but the 24mm I may only set at 1/100.


I can do the same if I'm willing to go to the Menu, but as your example notes, the minimum shutter speed will depend on the focal length of the lens you're using. Shooting manual mode is much simpler than going into the menu to change the minimum shutter speed. Of course, there is nothing wrong with having a minimum higher than 1/30th of a second. Setting it a 1/100th of a second would mean anything from 85mm down would be covered. However, I am happy to shoot at 1/30th when using either the 20 or 24mm lenses.

I was reacting in part to Peter's suggestion that Auto ISO be turned off because all it would ever do is add noise. I think Peter's decades of experience shooting film is evident in that comment since recent generations of Nikon DSLR cameras play quite happily with very high ISO. Here's a shot I took last Sunday at a friend's home with the 50 f/1.4 S.C. AI'd. Since I was shooting inside and needed a bit of depth to the images I set the camera at f/4 and shutter speed at 1/60th of a second. For this shot, the camera required ISO 6400. Yes, if you looked at the darkest part of the image at 100% resolution grain would be evident. This is completely unprocessed apart of reduction in size.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3460
Country: Germany

Hi Kevin, Ray is spot on: a very good camera-strap will make a huge difference (broad Op-Techs work for me).
That said, the X100 is a very good camera and in my opinion a great addition to a Nikon-kit. But I wouldn't and couldn't trade my Nikon-setup for a rangefinder-like camera, not even for a Leica. If you have any questions about the X100, please don't hesitate to ask (here, over at flickr or via PM).
Best of luck for your neck, Georg.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 2984
Country: United States

I have tried the Black Rapid Sport strap. Messed with it for an hour, was never able to get it comfortable. Georg, I will see if there is a local shop that carries the brand you have. I have tried a variety of staps to no avail. The closest I got to comfort was using a strap off a tripod. Very padded and wide. The problem with it was because of its size, it interfered with using the camera. An option I have also considered is a hand strap... I used that in my film days.



kings_freak
Registered: Jun 02, 2011
Total Posts: 930
Country: United States

kwoodard wrote:
I am in a bit of a conundrum... I have a very bad back, spend most of my days in pain that nothing can really be done about. I love my kit, I finally have it fleshed out about where I want it. It does everything I want and does it well. My problem is its weight. If I go on a trip, I usually take my whole kit (camera, 4 lenses, tripod, flash). My last trip, I was in pain for nearly a week after. My photography is evolving and I am needing less and less gear per outing, but even an afternoon with the D7000 around my neck sporting a 28/2.8 or 50/1.8, I am getting home with pain from the base of my skull to just below my rib cage. This isn't good, has me concerned, even has my doctor concerned. One of my coworkers has an M9 with a 35mm lens on it. Man, felt so nice, and the camera took superb pictures...probably 85% of what I shoot could be shot with it. Now an M9 with the 35mm is WAY out of my price-range. I told my friend this and she said, "This is what you want then..." and tossed me her Fuji X100. Not as sharp/clean as the M9, but at a tenth of the price, I was impressed. Loved its look, took very nice pictures, didn't feel that bad in hand. I may have to sell my DSLR and get one of these. What are your thoughts? Any of you in a similar boat when it comes to the weight of your kit and your body rebelling against it? How do you deal?

Sorry to hear about your pain Kevin. I personally use the SpiderPro holster. Here is the link. I have the 2 camera version since I shoot weddings and it was the best $225 (Price when I bought it) I have ever spent. It puts all the weight on my waist, so there is nothing hanging around my neck. I carry my D700 with 70-200 VR II and SB700 on one side and my D800 with my Sigma 35mm and SB900 on the other hip. Since I am just using my legs to carry the weight I don't have any fatigue, even after an 8 hour wedding.

–Tony



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 3002
Country: United States

Kevin, I use a hand strap all thr time
I also have a Black Rapid but use it when I go hiking or on vacation


Reagan



Mishu01
Registered: Nov 20, 2009
Total Posts: 2388
Country: Romania

Kevin, Reagan and John - thanks for commenting on my Bucharest night series.

Kevin, good to hear that you visited Bucharest. When did that happen? I also understand your problem with the weight of the gear. I have it as well... my back and my hips are hurting. But I have a sling kind of Kata bag that fits a camera and two - three lenses. If I take AF kit I'll probably put 28 and 85 f/1.8 AF-S which are quite lightweight and if I go MF I generally take 28/2 45/2.8 AI-P and 105/2.5... No flash, no tripod... Only in trips with the car or at special events I take my heavy gear like f/1.4 primes, etc. Having said that I do not see myself renouncing to my heavy glass or to my DSLRs in favor of any rangefinder or mirrorless system. In the worse scenario I'd add a Nikon 1 camera and I'd use it with some small primes from my kit when I do not need DSLR IQ.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4337
Country: United States

Mishu01 wrote:
Some night work in a rainy Bucharest with Noct 58/1.2. Taken from a hotel balcony a few weeks ago.








Mahai, wonderful set! I really like this one. Very nice scene.


kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 2984
Country: United States

Mishu01 wrote:
Kevin, Reagan and John - thanks for commenting on my Bucharest night series.

Kevin, good to hear that you visited Bucharest. When did that happen? I also understand your problem with the weight of the gear. I have it as well... my back and my hips are hurting. But I have a sling kind of Kata bag that fits a camera and two - three lenses. If I take AF kit I'll probably put 28 and 85 f/1.8 AF-S which are quite lightweight and if I go MF I generally take 28/2 45/2.8 AI-P and 105/2.5... No flash, no tripod... Only in trips with the car or at special events I take my heavy gear like f/1.4 primes, etc. Having said that I do not see myself renouncing to my heavy glass or to my DSLRs in favor of any rangefinder or mirrorless system. In the worse scenario I'd add a Nikon 1 camera and I'd use it with some small primes from my kit when I do not need DSLR IQ.

I was there in 1989. We were there for a night and day, then moved on to the next city. Long trip, but well worth it.



Mishu01
Registered: Nov 20, 2009
Total Posts: 2388
Country: Romania

mp356 wrote:
Mishu01 wrote:
Some night work in a rainy Bucharest with Noct 58/1.2. Taken from a hotel balcony a few weeks ago.



Mahai, wonderful set! I really like this one. Very nice scene.


Thanks Scott!

kwoodard wrote:
Mishu01 wrote:

Kevin, good to hear that you visited Bucharest. When did that happen?

I was there in 1989. We were there for a night and day, then moved on to the next city. Long trip, but well worth it.


WOW! That was right before the Romanian Revolution! What a year was that!



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4337
Country: United States

Peter and Samy, thank you for the comments.

Peter, maybe your flowers started as seedlings NORTH of the equator.

Ben, nice bus stop images. I like the shadow cast on the ground.

Paul, the aircraft images and Mt Whitney are very nice.

Ray (OH), that is one nasty goose! Just hope he does not decide to come after photographers.

Philip, nice work with the 28 2.8 ais.



montym
Registered: Jul 19, 2003
Total Posts: 4711
Country: United States

I haven't been here in a long time, but I thought I share a picture of Higgs.
I still love the 16mm

(It's a D800)

Monty



pbraymond
Registered: Oct 23, 2009
Total Posts: 1080
Country: United States

MDoc9523 wrote:
Curtis On the D7000 and the D600 you set the minimum ISO and the maximum ISO and the min shutter speed and the camera chooses the ISO. I almost always shoot in auto iso. The only problem I have ever had is when I forget to change the speed based on the different focal length. For the 300 4.5 I usually choose 1/1000 but the 24mm I may only set at 1/100.


Curtis, good suggestion on the manual mode. Seems like the best option to allow camera automation to follow the photographers wishes. For Kevin, and Ray, I now see my problem. I have my autoISO set at "Auto" where it uses the focal length from CPU lenses to change the minimum shutter speed (so that the minimum speed shifts based on the focal length I am shooting). With non-CPU lenses, the minimum shutter speed defaults to 1/30.



pbraymond
Registered: Oct 23, 2009
Total Posts: 1080
Country: United States

Mihai, the Bucharest series is awesome. I've always wanted to shoot rainy night scenes and process them to look like that.

Kevin, think lighter, even with DSLR's. While nothing is as light as X100's, I would say that some of the entry level DSLR's are truly lightweight, and you can add small light primes as well. I can see a D3200 and 35 f1.8 as being a good lightweight combo. Nothing wring with the X100 either as long as you are comfortable with the limitations of a single focal length, non-DSLR autofocus performance. If it was not so expensive I'd have on in addition to my DSLR setup. For me, my current weight/IQ compromise is an m43 body with a 40mm f1.7 equivalent lens. If I really have to go small and light it's a P&S. Whatever you choose, feel better soon.

mp356 wrote:
Ray (OH), that is one nasty goose! Just hope he does not decide to come after photographers.

I might go back tomorrow morning with a tripod and work that willow a little bit. I hope I don't find out.

Samy, the tulips with the 500P is tremendous. Great composition, and that's bokeh!!

Oosty wrote:
Ray O - it's very easy. Only the aperture ring needs work and most seem to unscrew quite easily. I was too enthusiatic with my first two and worked on the back of the lens also which with modern cameras is not necessary.

Peter, sure "looks" and "sounds" easy. I may just go for a bargain grade non-AI from KEH to give it a shot.



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 2642
Country: Brazil

saph wrote:
Three pics today.

500 F4P, wide open:









Terrific capture Samy. I liked the flowers with the 105/2.5 too.


mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 4337
Country: United States

montym wrote:
I haven't been here in a long time, but I thought I share a picture of Higgs.
I still love the 16mm

(It's a D800)

Monty



Hi Monty. Great to hear from you and to see "little" Higgs. The boy has got some hair!



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