Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2760

1       2       3              2760      
2761
       2762              5885       5886       end

pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 3003
Country: United States

asiostygius wrote: Golden-chevroned Tanager captured at ~4m of distance. This is a ~40% cropped image.
D7000 + TC-16A modified teleconverter + Nikkor 180mm f/2.8 ED ais hand held, ISO 400, f/2.8(=4.5) at 1/320s. Though exif shows a 145mm f/4, in fact this was an effective 288mm f/4.5 (x 1.5 crop factor of D7000 = 432mm lens).
We need at first manual focus and then activate the AF by the modified TC-16A.


Great example Jose, and quite the long winded image caption to explain what's going on.

I'm probably going to buy a non-modded TC-16a and mod it myself. Doesn't look too hard. I will document how hard it turns out to be.



pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 3003
Country: United States

Lieutenant Z wrote:
50 1.8 ais wo:



Google Translate tells me "Happy mature corn and wheat harvested" - whatever the caption, great image, Phillipe. Nothing mature around here yet. In fact, the wheat and corn is just starting to poke out of the ground.





pburke
Registered: Oct 08, 2010
Total Posts: 3003
Country: United States

asiostygius wrote:
Taken some days ago a deep reddish sunset at the big city: no winds or rain = heavier pollution in the air


Sunset with Nikkor 400mm f/5.6 K ED ai'd by labecoaves, on Flickr

D7000 + Nikkor 400mm f/5.6 K ED ai'd, supported on a windowsill, ISO 200, f/11 at 1/200s ~35% crop.
The air pollution at the big city delivers deeper reddish sunsets.


You just have got give air pollution credit for something positive - great color. How did you choose white balance? Just set to daylight? guessed it, or auto? I haven't seen the sun in days here - cloud pollution.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12616
Country: United States

kwoodard wrote:

Love the bokeh play on both of these.

leighton w wrote:
+1

I cant remember Curtis, did you say you liked the P more than the AI-s?

CGrindahl wrote:
I haven't done a side by side comparison of the 105 f/2.5 lenses in my kit. I don't know what I expected when I bought the first of two P version lenses but I was quite smitten with both the color and bokeh of the Sonnar lens. That was what motivated me to buy a cleaner copy and swap the aperture rings. Add the fact that I'm smitten with the pre-AI form factor and you come to the situation when every lens in my camera bag at the moment has scalloped focusing rings. I do love shooting with an all metal lens. That they all perform so well, even with optical designs that differ from the next generation of lenses. Nikon purportedly is producing ever better lenses with ever improved coatings, but still these old gems perform wonderfully well. It may be true that a 12 megapixel camera is kinder to old lenses than a 36 megapixel camera, but since I own a D700 with 12 things are working just fine for me. These lenses simply sparkle.


Thanks Curtis. One of these days I may experiment with the older lenses. I was impressed how well Nikki performed on my camera with the increase in mp's, so I have no doubt that others will perform just as well.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12616
Country: United States

Philippe - Something quite different from you, I love it!

Ronny - I really like both of them...but that snail shot blows me away!

Jose - That bird is stunning. For that matter, the sunset is stunning too! As far as the TC-16a goes, I think we agreed a long time ago that it was acceptable.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12616
Country: United States

georgms wrote:

Leighton, your fruits-shot is wonderful and was my pick at the WA-contest. I'm a bit sad that the other voters didn't recognized the quality of this shot.


Wow thanks Georg, that means a lot!



Ronny Olsson
Registered: Jun 24, 2012
Total Posts: 5049
Country: Sweden

leighton w wrote:
georgms wrote:

Leighton, your fruits-shot is wonderful and was my pick at the WA-contest. I'm a bit sad that the other voters didn't recognized the quality of this shot.



Leighton: love that shot


Thanks guys


Nikon 105mm f/2.5 AI by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr



Lieutenant Z
Registered: Nov 21, 2010
Total Posts: 3777
Country: France

pburke wrote:
Lieutenant Z wrote:
50 1.8 ais wo:



Google Translate tells me "Happy mature corn and wheat harvested" - whatever the caption, great image, Phillipe. Nothing mature around here yet. In fact, the wheat and corn is just starting to poke out of the ground.





It is a verse from the poem "Eve" written in 1913 by Charles Peguy, one of my favorite poet. It is quite moving because Péguy joined the French Army as a volunteer (he was over 40) and fell in the battle of Marne in 1914.
Quite difficult to translate with my lousy English but Péguy said something like :
"Happy are those who die for the carnal earth
But only if it be for a just war
Happy are the ripe ears of grain
And the wheat harvested"



designdog
Registered: Oct 05, 2004
Total Posts: 227
Country: United States

Ronny,

Very nice shot! I particularly like photographs that show something in the light of an ordinary day, as this does. Although the view is much more than ordinary: spectacular!

I also like this because you are not using the 135 2, and making me sick for not having one myself (I keep looking!)

David



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4677
Country: United States

Ronny _Olsson wrote:

Nikon 105mm f/2.5 AI by Ronny Olsson, on Flickr





This picture is positively stunning... If this was mine, would be framed, huge, over the mantle. This and your snail series are superb. Totally floored...



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

My 35th lens was waiting for me when I arrived home this afternoon, the 135 f/2.8 Q.C. AI'd. It doesn't look nearly as pristine in person as in the photos, though that would have simply been good fortune to buy this version of the 135 WITH the AI conversion and receive an EX+ lens. The glass is perfect and I see nothing inside the lens to be of concern, but there are a few blemishes on the barrel.

I mounted it immediately and wandered down the street to take a few photos. First I noticed the 1.5 meter minimal focusing distance, approaching territory of the 180 and 200mm lenses. I'd intended to place the front of the lens against two slats of a neighbor's fence to shoot roses on the other side but I was too close and had to step back. What I found when I opened the images, however, rather took my breath away. Here is one shot with a cropped closeup to follow. These were shot wide open.



I do believe this lens is a keeper. It is amazingly sharp and yields some luscious colors. And yes, Jose, this lens weighs the same as the 85 f/1.4 AI-s. It is quite a chuck of glass with an interesting hood built in. You have to unscrew it from its base position, slide it into place, then screw it tight. No wobble on this hood... Sadly, it doesn't have the scalloped focusing ring...



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

Ronny, your "Swedish Landscape" is absolutely outstanding! Fantastic work, makes me wanna jump on the next ferry to this beautiful country!

Curtis, congrats to MF-Nikkor #35! Your shots are wonderful, love the airy and fresh look.


I've had the very first MF-Nikkor bought new in box (except for the 50/1.8 Series-E that came as kit-lens with a F-301) in my hands and shipped it back today. All other MF-Nikkor's I have are from the used market.
After quite a while of thinking about pro's and con's I've ordered a PC-E 45/2.8. But the tilt-mechanism was obviously defect, sluggish and hard to turn.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4677
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
My 35th lens was waiting for me when I arrived home this afternoon, the 135 f/2.8 Q.C. AI'd. It doesn't look nearly as pristine in person as in the photos, though that would have simply been good fortune to buy this version of the 135 WITH the AI conversion and receive an EX+ lens. The glass is perfect and I see nothing inside the lens to be of concern, but there are a few blemishes on the barrel.

I mounted it immediately and wandered down the street to take a few photos. First I noticed the 1.5 meter minimal focusing distance, approaching territory of the 180 and 200mm lenses. I'd intended to place the front of the lens against two slats of a neighbor's fence to shoot roses on the other side but I was too close and had to step back. What I found when I opened the images, however, rather took my breath away. Here is one shot with a cropped closeup to follow. These were shot wide open.



I do believe this lens is a keeper. It is amazingly sharp and yields some luscious colors. And yes, Jose, this lens weighs the same as the 85 f/1.4 AI-s. It is quite a chuck of glass with an interesting hood built in. You have to unscrew it from its base position, slide it into place, then screw it tight. No wobble on this hood... Sadly, it doesn't have the scalloped focusing ring...


Now you see why it is in my top three lenses... I love my single coated version.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
Ronny, your "Swedish Landscape" is absolutely outstanding! Fantastic work, makes me wanna jump on the next ferry to this beautiful country!

Curtis, congrats to MF-Nikkor #35! Your shots are wonderful, love the airy and fresh look.


I've had the very first MF-Nikkor bought new in box (except for the 50/1.8 Series-E that came as kit-lens with a F-301) in my hands and shipped it back today. All other MF-Nikkor's I have are from the used market.
After quite a while of thinking about pro's and con's I've ordered a PC-E 45/2.8. But the tilt-mechanism was obviously defect, sluggish and hard to turn.


Thanks Georg. I have to say that the PC-E 45 f/2.8 is the one high priced lens that really tempts me, primarily because of the work Anton has posted here and elsewhere. There is something magical about the bokeh produced by that lens in action. Sorry the copy you got was troubled. Fortunate you were able to return it. I guess that is one advantage of buying a new lens from a reputable seller. But when you add your tax to the price, this is one serious lens... perhaps not in the same territory as your long lenses, but for mere mortals these are tough lenses to justify. I know for a pro they are tools that make money for you. All the best in that regard.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

I've joined your club Kevin. This is a special lens for sure. Here are two more from my afternoon ramble, still wide open.



Colors are so vibrant. I did practically nothing to either image apart from cropping for composition and re-sizing. I reduced exposure slightly in the first and made a gentle pass of smart sharpen for both. I really need to mount this lens on some tubes and get closer as Ronny has been doing with such great success using the f/2 135. This lens can clearly handle that kind of work. You've shown us that as well Kevin.

So two members to our club at the moment... perhaps others will follow.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

CGrindahl wrote:
georgms wrote:
Ronny, your "Swedish Landscape" is absolutely outstanding! Fantastic work, makes me wanna jump on the next ferry to this beautiful country!

Curtis, congrats to MF-Nikkor #35! Your shots are wonderful, love the airy and fresh look.


I've had the very first MF-Nikkor bought new in box (except for the 50/1.8 Series-E that came as kit-lens with a F-301) in my hands and shipped it back today. All other MF-Nikkor's I have are from the used market.
After quite a while of thinking about pro's and con's I've ordered a PC-E 45/2.8. But the tilt-mechanism was obviously defect, sluggish and hard to turn.


Thanks Georg. I have to say that the PC-E 45 f/2.8 is the one high priced lens that really tempts me, primarily because of the work Anton has posted here and elsewhere. There is something magical about the bokeh produced by that lens in action. Sorry the copy you got was troubled. Fortunate you were able to return it. I guess that is one advantage of buying a new lens from a reputable seller. But when you add your tax to the price, this is one serious lens... perhaps not in the same territory as your long lenses, but for mere mortals these are tough lenses to justify. I know for a pro they are tools that make money for you. All the best in that regard.


Thank you, Curtis! I've played a lot with the idea to add a long lens like the 400/3.5 or 500/4 to my stable, but had so much fun with the PC 85/2.8 lately that I finally picked the (similar priced) 45. In the last months I've shot a lot pictures with the PC 85 tilted, not to create a shallow DoF, mainly to "connect" subjects like free standing sculptures and such. On many occasions the 85 was a bit too long for the task.
I hope that the return and re-transfer work fast and I can order a hopefully properly working copy.



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 4677
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
I've joined your club Kevin. This is a special lens for sure. Here are two more from my afternoon ramble, still wide open.



Colors are so vibrant. I did practically nothing to either image apart from cropping for composition and re-sizing. I reduced exposure slightly in the first and made a gentle pass of smart sharpen for both. I really need to mount this lens on some tubes and get closer as Ronny has been doing with such great success using the f/2 135. This lens can clearly handle that kind of work. You've shown us that as well Kevin.

So two members to our club at the moment... perhaps others will follow.


Yup, even the beater lenses like mine are good.

I hope to get a lot of shots this saturday, going to a wildlife preserve next to a river. Probably going to have to think carefully about what to bring. Thinking my 80-200 f/4.5, the new 35/2.8, and my 50/1.8E... Don't want to get too heavy. Last time my girls went, they had a family of deer just walk through their little party, not frightened of people at all... Hope to have a similar experience.



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

Earlier in the afternoon I did a bit of shooting with the 105 f/2.5 P AI'd. Here are a couple of shots, the second perhaps a bit inspired by Philippe's black and white shot of grasses. Unfortunately, the colors were much too seductive so I didn't convert the image. But he got me thinking... not a bad thing most of the time.


This is the trunk of a palm tree with ivy doing what it does best... climbing...


Lavender plants attracting bees of all sorts, including this bumble bee.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5637
Country: United States

asiostygius wrote:
Taken some days ago a deep reddish sunset at the big city: no winds or rain = heavier pollution in the air


Sunset with Nikkor 400mm f/5.6 K ED ai'd by labecoaves, on Flickr

D7000 + Nikkor 400mm f/5.6 K ED ai'd, supported on a windowsill, ISO 200, f/11 at 1/200s ~35% crop.
The air pollution at the big city delivers deeper reddish sunsets.



Very nice Jose.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5637
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
I've joined your club Kevin. This is a special lens for sure. Here are two more from my afternoon ramble, still wide open.




I really like the roses in the picket fence. Nicely seen.



1       2       3              2760      
2761
       2762              5885       5886       end