Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2737

1       2       3              2737      
2738
       2739              4432       4433       end

David Antilley
Registered: Dec 22, 2006
Total Posts: 313
Country: United States

I tried a different portrait of my dog Daisy. I am still undecided if I like it or not. I really like the focal length of the 35 f1.4.

Oops, I messed up as it's the 85mm.


D800 and 85mm f1.4


DSC_0528.jpg by TXFZ1, on Flickr



MDoc9523
Registered: Aug 13, 2006
Total Posts: 5115
Country: United States

^^^^^^^
I like it David! The 35mm 1.4 is one of my favorites. Bokeh sometimes has a little character.
That's ok I love my 85mm 1.4 just as well



rankamateur
Registered: Nov 25, 2007
Total Posts: 861
Country: United States

One of Nikons best kept secrets(not to this group) The 75-150E amazes me every time I stick it on the camera. Leighton it looks like this one is getting ready to have another kid. I'll try to keep em up this way and not near your crops.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3515
Country: Germany

Samy, love the burrowing owl - what a nice portrait of this fascinating bird!

Curtis, good job on the yellow flower (I prefer the first shot)! The Bay-image is great, love the jagged foreground and your framing. In my opinion it would benefit from cropping the upper 1/6 of the sky away, but that's just me ;-)
My personal favorite from your street-set is the gent with the camera above his head - he looks really happy about his subject ;-)

Reagan, the steps in the woods are really nice, and so is the inside of the small chapel.

Jose, I will go through your images from your journey when they are complete (maybe as a slideshow) to get a better feel for your "trip".
Sad to see the work of modern barbarians - there's an unwritten rule among the graffiti-spryers here to stay away from historic sites.
And thanks for reminding us about the abilities of the 400/5.6 ED-IF in such a beautiful manner.

John, I like especially the second portrait, looks like a fun-weekend with the family

Jeff, I prefer the second "Shadow Hills II" over "Mark I" by a large margin - somehow I've felt like I've lost my eyes in the desert of version 1.

agentbird, your work is highly inspiring, thanks for sharing these fine images!

Ronny, excellent stuff as always! I particularly enjoyed the churchgoer (?), the breathing Nitro and for sure your beautiful portraits of your daughter.

David, this lens has for sure some character - love it!



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 2704
Country: Brazil

Thanks Samy, Dean, Scott, Peter and Ray for the comments.

Ron, very nice deer.



Two more from Herculaneum.

Partial view of the House of Wattlework (Casa a Graticcio) showing the narrow (one-way) street and modern day Ercolano at the background, some 20 m above Herculaneum streets:


Partial view of the House of Wattlework (Casa a Graticcio) by labecoaves, on Flickr

This house is interesting because of its timber frame construction mostly at the second floor walls.
D7000 + Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 ais CPU'd hand held, ISO 200, f/8 at 1/500s.




Windlass and rope, House of Wattlework - Herculaneum:


Windlass and rope, House of Wattlework - Herculaneum by labecoaves, on Flickr

This wooden windlass with rope was found in the well at the house's courtyard.
It was protected (from weather and today's barbarians...) inside a box with a glass cover.
D7000 + Nikkor 20mm f/2.8 ais CPU'd hand held, ISO 1600, f/4 at 1/80s, ~ 10% cropped.




georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3515
Country: Germany

rankamateur wrote:
One of Nikons best kept secrets(not to this group) The 75-150E amazes me every time I stick it on the camera. Leighton it looks like this one is getting ready to have another kid. I'll try to keep em up this way and not near your crops.


Ron, what a nice example of the quality of Nikon's old Series-E lenses!

Reminds me of a shot taken 8 weeks ago - a roebuck visiting the garden.
At first I've thought he's ill, but later I've figured out he has maybe just his cheeks full with found windfalls:



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 3202
Country: United States

asiostygius wrote:
georgms wrote:
Amazing posts on the last few pages! Will come back later to comment...

Here are a few images from today:


The 20/3.5 Ais (here at f/11 on a D700) can be tricked to create some nice sun-stars...



Fantastic! I liked the "grain" too.


+1

Reagan



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 3202
Country: United States

Jose, where do you find these creatures I know they are not outside your balcony
Ronny, nice to see your daughter make it to this thread

Thanks, Georg

Reagan



saph
Registered: Jun 10, 2012
Total Posts: 2493
Country: United States

Went back to the NEF file for the elephant image and did a very narrow crop to see how the 400 5.6 did at detail level. Ray and Scott, this would be a great addition to your toolkits.

I know I said this before, but after getting the 400 5.6 AIS I got rid of the 70-300VR which had been a standard walkaround birding lens, as well as the 150-500 Sigma, even though I lost AF capability at distance. The sharpness of this lens was just that different from the modern zooms. The new 80-400VR is intriguing, but for a lot more money, more weight and bulkier (77 vs. 72mm filter).







georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3515
Country: Germany

Jose, the timber-frame-construction looks familiar - many older houses here are built this way (with a mud/straw-mix between the frames).

Samy, that's a pretty crisp crop - do you shoot from a monopod or tripod or hand-held?



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 3515
Country: Germany

Thanks for the comments on the earlier posted pictures!
Here's a shot taken just for fun - a bunch of tulips (aging tulips, to be precise ;-):

D700, Ai 55/1.2 wide-open, ISO200, 1/640sec, indoors
There was some nice afternoon-light on the flowers and I've tried to get a dainty, airy look.



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 2704
Country: Brazil

saph wrote:
...
I know I said this before, but after getting the 400 5.6 AIS I got rid of the 70-300VR which had been a standard walkaround birding lens, as well as the 150-500 Sigma, even though I lost AF capability at distance. The sharpness of this lens was just that different from the modern zooms. The new 80-400VR is intriguing, but for a lot more money, more weight and bulkier (77 vs. 72mm filter).
...


Samy, I would add the horrible focus breathing, some say it is a ~ 260-280mm instead of a 400mm at less than 15m; simply unforgivable for birders!



asiostygius
Registered: Nov 29, 2011
Total Posts: 2704
Country: Brazil

Thanks Georg; nice tulips with a dreamy effect.

Reagan, for sure those were taken far, far outside my balcony



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 3202
Country: United States

Someone say Tulips
50 1.4SC

The bee landed at the same moment I pushed the shutter It was pure luck

Reagan



kwoodard
Registered: Aug 04, 2012
Total Posts: 3133
Country: United States

Reagan wrote:
Someone say Tulips
50 1.4SC

The bee landed at the same moment I pushed the shutter It was pure luck

Reagan


Love it! Had one of those myself. Think I posted it here before...but if not...

Series E 50mm, reverse Macro...


Up close and personal by Kevin.Woodard, on Flickr



saph
Registered: Jun 10, 2012
Total Posts: 2493
Country: United States

Jose, going backwards to look at posts I re-viewed one of yours from Herculaneum and want add that mixed brick/stone work is delightful to look at. Interesting I had never heard this name vs. Pompeii, but looking it up, Herculaneum buildings are much better preserved.

Ray, wish someday I can grab some of these lenses and get to a safari somewhere near Peter Besides, I still haven't figured out how I could transport the 500 F4P anywhere other than a car trip

John, very nice family pics with the 135 3.5, and of course the 50 1.2.

Reagan, that butterfly really pops!

Jeff, beautiful colors in the Easter egg basket, and terrific job in getting a closeup of the blue egg. And Shadow Hills II is very nice.

Curtis, nice ice cream and camera portraits. In that one image, the younger girl in the center seems to be telling her relative (?) its her camera, she is not sharing it

Agentbird, delightful use of the 45 PC-E in Kaula Lumpur.

Ronny, you keep on posting those delicious 135 f2 + TC images and my willpower to get no more equipment keeps on weakening. Well maybe its just a TC, not a lens, hmmmm

Ron, you can send Bambi over here, at the worst it will finish off whatever bird seed I put in the feeder Very nice spotting of the deer with the zoom.

Georg, nice sunstar. And just came across the Heinkel villa. Very geometric. Interesting building, great use of the 28 PC and thanks for posting that. And interesting deer, looks like one cheek is full. Tobacco?

David, nice image. What aperture is that dog photo with the 85 1.4?

Reagan and Georg, very nice tulip shots.

Kevin, reverse macro on a bee! Very nice image, but be cautious getting close




saph
Registered: Jun 10, 2012
Total Posts: 2493
Country: United States

Georg, thanks, the 400 AIS has almost always been handheld. Its such a convenient weight/size for long walks or hikes; a monopod would definitely add stability and sharpness, but just make things cumbersome.

georgms wrote:
Jose, the timber-frame-construction looks familiar - many older houses here are built this way (with a mud/straw-mix between the frames).

Samy, that's a pretty crisp crop - do you shoot from a monopod or tripod or hand-held?



David Antilley
Registered: Dec 22, 2006
Total Posts: 313
Country: United States

saph wrote:

David, nice image. What aperture is that dog photo with the 85 1.4?



The exif says f2.0, the 85mm will jump from f1.8 to f2.0...so it's somewhere around there.

David



rankamateur
Registered: Nov 25, 2007
Total Posts: 861
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
rankamateur wrote:
One of Nikons best kept secrets(not to this group) The 75-150E amazes me every time I stick it on the camera. Leighton it looks like this one is getting ready to have another kid. I'll try to keep em up this way and not near your crops.


Ron, what a nice example of the quality of Nikon's old Series-E lenses!

Reminds me of a shot taken 8 weeks ago - a roebuck visiting the garden.
At first I've thought he's ill, but later I've figured out he has maybe just his cheeks full with found windfalls:



Cute and she has probably got a mouth full of Brussels Sprouts



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 13621
Country: United States

I feel like I have full-time job... Between shooting and processing images I'm busy all the time, but I still haven't made it to San Francisco. The weather forecast was for rain and overcast so I figured this would be a down day. But by mid-morning I saw some sun breaking through clouds over Mount Tamalpais and thought perhaps this was a good day to try Muir Woods again. It has been raining, so perhaps the tourists stayed home... They didn't. It was a mess again with full parking lots and visitors parking along the roadway for well over a mile past the entrance. I turned around with the intention of giving it up, but when I didn't see any cars waiting at the entrance to main lot closest to the gate I pulled in. Then I noticed someone getting ready to leave. I lucked out! Then I discovered for a one time fee of $10 I could get a "senior pass" that allows me a lifetime of free entrance to national parks and recreation lands. Not too shabby.

I took over three hundred photos today so it will take some time to review them and identify the keepers. Until I'm ready to begin major posting, I'll drop one shot on the thread. This is something we've seen before from John, who loves to point his camera up in the air and take a photo of tree limbs, though he generally uses the 16 f/3.5 AI and I used the 24 f/2.8 N.C. AI'd. Nikki did get a workout today, but when taking photos of tall trees I needed wide, not long.


There are redwoods. You'll see more of them...



1       2       3              2737      
2738
       2739              4432       4433       end