Manual Focus Nikon Glass
/forum/topic/929565/2405

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georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

James Markus wrote:
The horse, in this image, has the most intriguing expression. I don't know if it is some internal reflection on something that had just occurred, or if it is something occurring just out of the frame. Regardless, the horses expression makes the photo for me - I really like it!

georgms wrote:
A recent shot with the 180/2.8 ED:
...
"Time for a cig" - D3s, ISO1600, 180/2.8ED at f/4, 1/1000sec.
I'm not happy with the framing, but at least I've managed to nail the focus on this snapshot.



James, thanks! Unfortunately I'm not an expert when it comes to horses expressions. I see a bit of tiredness and a deep devotion for it's rider. But that's based on watching old western-flicks ;-) There were other horses and people around, maybe it's a reaction on those.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

asiostygius wrote:

My first negative "scanning" with a digital camera, after instructions here:
http://www.petapixel.com/2012/05/18/how-to-scan-film-negatives-with-a-dslr/

...

Old negative duped through a D7000 + 20mm extension tube + 55mm f/3.5 micro @f/8 and ISO 100 +ES-1 slide copying adapter, flash + diffuser behind slide. ~35% cropped.
Original negative (Kodak Gold ISO 400) was taken ~2000-2001 with a F90x camera + Nikkor 400mm f/5.6 ED non IF.


Jose, very nice Woodpecker-shot and a to my eyes very good "scan"! I still like the F90x - two of those were my workhorses for some years during the late 90's.



georgms
Registered: Jan 08, 2009
Total Posts: 4045
Country: Germany

Adam, very nice light-trails! What shutter-speed did you use? It looks like more than 30 sec.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5637
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
Scott, thank you! I like the graphic nature of your construction-shot. The highlights are really lively and suit my personal taste just fine. The iron-benders (reinforcement benders) have for sure the hardest job on a construction site.


Thank you Georg. These guys do have hard work.



mp356
Registered: May 31, 2009
Total Posts: 5637
Country: United States

Adam Bavier wrote:



Very nice Adam.



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 4614
Country: United States

+1 Adam

I don't know how you guys go out into the weather to get these shots
I mean they are beautiful and all but almost getting you car stuck walking and being out in the cold!!
I don"t go outside at all below 50 degrees and only if I have too below 55
I am impressed

Reagan



Reagan
Registered: Jan 10, 2010
Total Posts: 4614
Country: United States

Jose, like all the scanned photos
I tried that once but ended up just throwing about 1000 slides away because I got tired of doing it
Most were vacations with the first wife so I didn't really care about them that much

Georg, Nice B/W of the cowboy and horse
Ray, great work with the 300
Scott ,the iron work and background really go together just right on the OOF area

Reagan



pbraymond
Registered: Oct 23, 2009
Total Posts: 1940
Country: United States

Georg, super horse pic with the 180.

Alan, very nice light trails. I can enjoy cold weather photography, not sure if I'd hike a half mile in the cold each way though unless I have a specific image in my mind, which you obviously did and executed beautifully.

Reagan, I don't have the heart to throw out too many slides. One of these day's I'll set up a DSLR scanner since my very old scanner has a SCSI interface, and I'm already two computers away from having a SCSI interface. Sometimes I want to just go back and revisit the areas to shoot again instead of scanning. I have a 55 micro and tube to go 1:1, just need a good setup and a return of a lightbox that I've loaned out for over 2 years now :-)



pbraymond
Registered: Oct 23, 2009
Total Posts: 1940
Country: United States

A couple from a quick hit Alberta clipper snow event this evening.

D700, 75-150 "Tree Line and Snow", single frame cropped into a wide horizontal shot. I liked the contrasting shades of the foreground trees and background trees due to the snowfall.
*EDIT* just changed the crop a little, decided that it made for a stronger image.

D700, 55 f2.8 AIS "Truck" shot. Slight crop, I liked the subtle tones and just a hint of color from the truck.



Adam Bavier
Registered: Aug 05, 2009
Total Posts: 180
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
Adam, very nice light-trails! What shutter-speed did you use? It looks like more than 30 sec.


It was 30 seconds at F/8. There was a lot of people going north (white head lights), and a handful going south (red lights). I looked over my shoulder and waited until I saw a large grouping going south and started the shot right as they were driving under the bridge I was standing on in an attempt to get a full streak of the red lights.

I liked this shot because of the full streaks, and the odd aberration of the white spots on the bottom left from where a car bounced and the lights hit the road.

I had tried a couple at F/2, but the foreground wasn't as out of focus as I wanted, essentially it was the same as F/8, but a tad softer and with shorter light streaks. ISO 100 would have bumped the time up from 4 seconds to 8 seconds, but I would have needed to take a bunch of photos to get one with nice streaks. I did have a 10 stop filter along, to more fully test out the F/2 option, but once the cop came, I figured it was time to call it quits for the evening.

The F/2 shot does clean up a bit with some work in Capture NX2. 2 layers of Unsharp, one focusing on the clarity (4, 97, 0), next on sharpening (19, 20, 10), then a third Highpass sharpening layer (1.91, overlay, 45%).

Good to know how our lenses perform, and how to get the most from them.



huddy
Registered: Oct 19, 2010
Total Posts: 1885
Country: United States

Adam, that is very nice!

Many more comments coming hopefully tomorrow on all the great images that have shown up.

In celebration of hitting a quarter of a century today, I have decided to finally make the jump to shooting some 6x7 analog goodness (I have never fully bonded with the 645's ergonomics... probably would have helped to have a hand grip). In anticipation of acquiring a Pentax 67 (the BEAST), 105/2.4 and 165/4 LS lens, I'm going to send my Mamiya 645 kit to a new home... naturally, I used my trusty 105/2.5 and a few of my K-rings for the product shot inside of a little light box that I built. Here is the rear element of my 80/1.9C:



huddy
Registered: Oct 19, 2010
Total Posts: 1885
Country: United States

A lot has changed for us in the last year... shooting with MFNG has been one of the few constants!


After a year, our little Eli is quite fun, and loves his mom (and me too!)


It is fortunate that he really likes other babies too, as we're going to be welcoming another late this July:


Although the little one is rather unaware, Nikki and I are very excited to see our family growing and I'm sure I'll be flooding the boards with pictures of another cute baby soon!



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
Scott, thank you! I like the graphic nature of your construction-shot. The highlights are really lively and suit my personal taste just fine. The iron-benders (reinforcement benders) have for sure the hardest job on a construction site.


Love the shot as well Scott, but I bring a bit of history and experience to this subject. When I was a teen, a neighbor who worked for the Minnesota Highway Department was arranging summer jobs for everyone when they turned 16. Over the years I spent every summer and even two full winters working at a wide variety of tasks. I learned enough that I got a job with a testing agency and began inspecting construction projects. Although I was studying American history, politics and philosophy at the university, I was working as a testing technician and inspector on every imaginable construction site. By the time I moved to Seattle, I had the skills that permitted me to inspect concrete pours on high rise buildings, which meant that I would go through structural plans and inspect all the reinforcing steel in place before they could pour the concrete. Then I'd examine the concrete to make certain it was acceptable before it could be poured.

I even applied for a job as a civil engineer with my liberal arts degree and was invited for the test. I didn't finally apply, but my experience with construction enabled me to manage construction projects for the redevelopment agency I eventually worked at, including a four year project from design development through completion of a new city hall. I remain fascinated by construction projects like this, though I really have no interest in climbing to the top of concrete truck to look at the mix before it is poured, as I did as a youth. Now I would do as you did, and simply take a photo...



CGrindahl
Registered: Dec 17, 2004
Total Posts: 16784
Country: United States

Wonderful set of images Alan. Yes, a momentous year for you and your family. But you're not resting on your laurels it appears... Another so soon?! I am impressed. Clearly, the two of you are naturals at this and judging from Eli's expression parenthood is working for everyone. Congratulations!



huddy
Registered: Oct 19, 2010
Total Posts: 1885
Country: United States

CGrindahl wrote:
Wonderful set of images Alan. Yes, a momentous year for you and your family. But you're not resting on your laurels it appears... Another so soon?! I am impressed. Clearly, the two of you are naturals at this and judging from Eli's expression parenthood is working for everyone. Congratulations!


As my wife and I like to say Curtis, we only have so many years to have children so we'll have them while we can! It will be good for Eli to have a playmate so soon!



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4208
Country: South Africa

John - nioce start with Nicky esp the pano

Ray - lovley pics with the 300. Are they handheld?

Jose - the flower is very nice and the woodpecker is excellent. So like African woodpeckers.

Georg - love the cowboy

Scott - really narrow DOF with that lens - interesting

Raymond - stay indoors! I shiver just looking at those two.

Alan - good news and a nice series



Oosty
Registered: Mar 09, 2009
Total Posts: 4208
Country: South Africa

A couple with the 28-45 which due to non CPU lens clash I've called 25mm on my camera menu



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12614
Country: United States

georgms wrote:
A recent shot with the 180/2.8 ED:

"Time for a cig" - D3s, ISO1600, 180/2.8ED at f/4, 1/1000sec.
I'm not happy with the framing, but at least I've managed to nail the focus on this snapshot.


Not too often you see cowboys with earrings!



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12614
Country: United States

mp356 wrote:
Getting ready to pour concrete. Taken with the 28-50 ais wide open. Thanks for looking.
Scott


I like it Scott, good to see someone else using this lens.



leighton w
Registered: Nov 12, 2010
Total Posts: 12614
Country: United States

pbraymond wrote:
A couple from a quick hit Alberta clipper snow event this evening.

D700, 75-150 "Tree Line and Snow", single frame cropped into a wide horizontal shot. I liked the contrasting shades of the foreground trees and background trees due to the snowfall.
*EDIT* just changed the crop a little, decided that it made for a stronger image.

D700, 55 f2.8 AIS "Truck" shot. Slight crop, I liked the subtle tones and just a hint of color from the truck.

I like the first one Ray with the truck positioned in the frame that way. Well seen.



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