Mustang Air to Air: The Sequel
/forum/topic/600984/4028

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stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 3206
Country: United States

NAPP and Kelby Training merge into one entity...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLeIBZzm-Ms

[edit for TOPP. Digging through the archives: my very first outing with my very first DSLR: November 2005, with the Canon 5D]



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 1830
Country: United States

stevez wrote:
Digital limited edition art for screen display only: discuss!

After reading the article, my first thought was to give "s[edition]" credit for finding an interesting method of marketing computer wallpaper sales. For me, there were also a few questions that I've not yet resolved.

Does the display of imagery on a computer monitor or flatscreen TV constitute art? I'm guessing that part of the answer has much to do with the image and image maker/artist.

Is the traditional method of displaying framed art/photography becoming obsolete? I hope not. I'm of the vintage that loves to hold photographs. I also enjoy admiring fine art (paintings, prints, photographs) that are displayed in homes, offices, museums, etc. I'm not sure how much I'd enjoy looking at monitors/displays hung on walls compared to the "real thing".

Is this a new wave of opportunities for the struggling artist to have his/her work sold/seen? Might be. Considering that most businesses, including galleries and museums, are having to work with more restricted budgets these days, this may offer them and new artists a venue to join forces in a way that does not break the budget.

Is this a way for the "masses" to bring more art/photography into their homes, businesses, and lives without spending a fortune on original work and the associated display costs and space required? Again, could be. I might not be able to afford an original limited edition print of Wender's "Lounge Painting 1", but I probably could afford $21 to have a digital copy displayed on my computer.

Again I say; interesting. BTW, I've been in the Gila Bend hotel where Wender captured "Lounge Painting 1". To his credit, I never considered photographing such a scene. That being said, I like his image very much - but I'd prefer a large print to a digital copy



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 1830
Country: United States

stevez wrote:
NAPP and Kelby Training merge into one entity...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLeIBZzm-Ms

[edit for TOPP. Digging through the archives: my very first outing with my very first DSLR: November 2005, with the Canon 5D]

Sir Steve - What a terrific photograph. I've always liked the art deco style of commercial buildings that seemed to be popular in the 1930's and 1940's. Your image does the theatre proud and shows how you hit the ground running with digital equipment. You and the 5D appear to have been a formidable team



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 3206
Country: United States

Jeff W. wrote:
stevez wrote:
NAPP and Kelby Training merge into one entity...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLeIBZzm-Ms

[edit for TOPP. Digging through the archives: my very first outing with my very first DSLR: November 2005, with the Canon 5D]

Sir Steve - What a terrific photograph. I've always liked the art deco style of commercial buildings that seemed to be popular in the 1930's and 1940's. Your image does the theatre proud and shows how you hit the ground running with digital equipment. You and the 5D appear to have been a formidable team


Thanks, Jeff!



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 1830
Country: United States

Like most anyone wielding a camera, I really enjoy early and late light. Especially if you have something interesting to bounce those special tones off of. This rotund AA 767-200 serves as a nice reflector of subtle warm light as the sun slowly disappears behind the nearby pacific horizon.



Rodolfo Paiz
Registered: Jan 07, 2007
Total Posts: 9700
Country: United States

Good morning, everyone!

I've missed you all quite a bit, and I'm now almost 100 pages back in my reading. It's either say a ton or say nothing at all, and -- uncharacteristically perhaps -- I'm going to go with the latter. Suffice it to say that we're all healthy and happy, and that everything is going beautifully. Busy enough to preempt my MATA time is busy indeed.

Merry Christmas to all, and Happy New Year as well! I pray that you all are doing even better than you could have possibly hoped, and that the Year of Our Lord 2014 brings you even more blessings than those you so richly deserve.

I'll be back soon... I hope!



Colin Giersberg
Registered: Jun 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2062
Country: United States

Till then, safe travels, Rodolfo. Belated Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you as well.



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 15934
Country: United States

Thinking of you this morning Rodolfo. All the best right back at you and yours. Just drop in and say nothing if you're pressed, but drop in. We'll be here.



nikon boy
Registered: Jun 09, 2009
Total Posts: 41
Country: Australia

Magic stuff Darren i really like that shot

I can tell you were in your element mate

Cheers

Norm L



nickjohnson
Registered: Sep 15, 2009
Total Posts: 720
Country: United Kingdom

Jeff, Thanks for posting “AMERICAN SUNSET”. I find it an interesting – and very beautiful – continuation of our discussion re the nature of light. I'm much taken with the transition from late day warm orange at the top to cool blue hour at the bottom. Keeping the overall balance is a very neat trick – helps to show off the different shades of “grey” on the engine cowling. Nice job.
I have to say that the biggest thing I've learnt this last year or so is how little I know about light. I've read and studied like crazy (well, by my standards) but I still have so much to learn..... and so it goes.



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 1830
Country: United States

Thanks for the kind words Nick. This was a challenging scene for me precisely because of the mix of warm and cool tones that existed. It was definitely a tricky balancing act in post processing. I don't anticipate mastering these transitional times any time soon; however, it is a hoot experimenting and learning a little more each time I have the opportunity to photograph in these conditions.



nrferguson
Registered: Apr 20, 2004
Total Posts: 1585
Country: United Kingdom

Apparently I'm not going to Yellowstone this year!! I thought it was agreed but when the domestic authorities actually UNDERSTOOD (as distinct from being told countless times) that including stopover in Dallas Ft Worth it was 17 hours each way she vetoed it until she has retired (when we can go for 3-4 weeks) which isn't until 2015. Instead I'm going to suggest she might like to visit this place!
http://www.viralnova.com/dangerous-trail-huashan/
Niall



Colin Giersberg
Registered: Jun 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2062
Country: United States

Norm, welcome to MA2A. Hang around and enjoy the images, the camaraderie, and become part of the MA2A family. Hope to see more soon.

Regards, Colin



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 1830
Country: United States

For Christmas my sweetheart presented me with a terrific book titled "BEHIND PHOTOGRAPHS - Archiving Photographic Legends" by Tim Mantoani. The book is a result of Mantoani's personal quest to document and preserve noted photographers together with their favorite images. Says Mantoani, “We have come to a point in history where we are losing both photographic recording mediums and iconic photographers. While many people are familiar with iconic photographs, the general public has no idea of who created them. This book became a means to do that, the photographer and their photograph in one image.” All images in the book were photographed with a 20x24 view camera using Polaroid film. After each photograph was taken and the Polaroid "peeled", the iconic photographer (i.e. subject) would write at the bottom of the Polaroid his or her thoughts about their favorite photograph - great insights.

This is a large hardbound book (11.3 x 14.2 inches, 208 pages & 5 pounds) with excellent printing and binding. You can get copies via Amazon in the $40 range, which is pleasantly less than the $60 listed price. More details can be found on Mr. Mantoani's website - http://behindphotographs.com

Be advised, this book has nothing to do with aviation photography. That being said, if you love photography, I believe you'll enjoy this book.

For example, here is one insight from the book that I found extremely interesting. Jeff Widener is the photographer that took the iconic image in 1989 of a lone man confronting a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square. He was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for this photograph. He was shooting from the 5th floor of the Beijiing Hotel after smuggling his camera gear past Chinese security. As he framed the line of tanks up perfectly with his 300mm lens, a man walked into the frame. Widener's first thought was, "Get out of my shot, you are going to ruin the composition." Apparently, he thought he was being photo-bombed



Go4Long
Registered: Sep 04, 2005
Total Posts: 1483
Country: Canada

Well...I went and fell behind again. Work is driving me to have no time of my own lately. Lots of stellar imagery over the last several pages...and Jim, the idea of your already stellar work as seen through the sensor of a Phase is a thought that borders on mind numbing.

Ah well...

I sold my 400mm 2.8 a while back (to another FM member actually), and for about the first six months I can say I didn't regret it. But recently had an opportunity to do some shooting that really warranted the 400 being around and must say I missed it.

As much as it was a pain in the posterior to travel with, I actually started working the math on what the rental of a big lens would cost me if I were to do 4 shoots a year with it, and realized that the amount of value that a big lens loses in a year is actually less than what it costs to rent (whether you buy new or used seems to make very little difference to the calculation).

Well, that was my rambling thoughts of the day. :P In conclusion I think I'll be looking long and hard at something in the 400 - 600mm range come bonus time this year.



FlyingPhotog
Registered: May 09, 2008
Total Posts: 4370
Country: United States

Go Round or Go Home



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 15934
Country: United States

Welcome back Steven! Thanks Buddy, we'll see how that all shakes out. I don't think I'll be faced with an immediate decision, because no one has called me back in two weeks at the local level to answer some of my questions. As we said a little earlier, if they aren't all over you at the time of the sale, they certainly won't be around when something goes south. Disappointing to some degree, but I'd rather know now.

Sorry you are missing your 400, that's a beautiful lens and you're great with it. You might look at the 500 II if you don't mind an extra 100mm.

Stay warm up there, loved your Christmas portrait! Hope to see you this year at some point.

JW



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 15934
Country: United States

Jay! Jay.............! There's magic in your eyes and hands my friend.



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 15934
Country: United States

January is proving to be a bit of a challenge. Not due to lack of work, but an abundance of weather. Temps have come back up to the mid 40's, but as I write this, the boys in the tower would be calling it about 300 and a quarter. I had the biggest month since November '08 all lined up as the year clicked over, but a bunch of it has shifted to February. That'll be interesting, because February was cram packed already.

Had a meeting with a fairly new client this morning. When I sat down at the boardroom table they grinned and handed me three pages, single spaced, all projects they would like me to capture in 2014. Certainly the largest single block of work I have ever received. Whew........................



Go4Long
Registered: Sep 04, 2005
Total Posts: 1483
Country: Canada

JWilsonphoto wrote:
Welcome back Steven! Thanks Buddy, we'll see how that all shakes out. I don't think I'll be faced with an immediate decision, because no one has called me back in two weeks at the local level to answer some of my questions. As we said a little earlier, if they aren't all over you at the time of the sale, they certainly won't be around when something goes south. Disappointing to some degree, but I'd rather know now.

Sorry you are missing your 400, that's a beautiful lens and you're great with it. You might look at the 500 II if you don't mind an extra 100mm.

Stay warm up there, loved your Christmas portrait! Hope to see you this year at some point.

JW


Thanks Jim...I'm looking at the 500 pretty seriously, just gotta see what the wife will let me get away with.

On the topic of warmth it's been a bizarre winter up here, we've had more major temperature fluctuations than I can remember in the 20 years that I've lived here. We had a day last week that was -40 (which incidentally is the same in either Fahrenheit or Celsius), and then 2 days later it was above freezing for a few days in a row, followed by another dip well in to the minus double digits, and today was a balmy 5 degrees (41 Fahrenheit, which is practically t-shirt weather), all in the course of a week...we've also had near record snow falls to the point that I can't clear the bottom part of my driveway as the snow on the street it so high that it would cause a ridge that my wife's car wouldn't be able to get over.



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