Mustang Air to Air: The Sequel
/forum/topic/600984/4025

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Wrei
Registered: Aug 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2209
Country: United States

Mark, I didn't see a problem in 3D.

edit for TOPP







stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 3298
Country: United States

The thing about stereo views is that they truly are two different photos. I could have tried to crop this pair so the left at right edges of the middle-ground buildings were identical; but then the foreground and the background offsets would be opposite and very noticeable. When I put this pair together, I aligned the upper right corner of that large, light-colored building at the center of both frames, then cropped the two images to the same size before arranging them as a stereo-X pair.

It really makes little difference what point you choose as your 'anchor point' when constructing these pairs: your visual system is quite forgiving and will do whatever it needs to do to make sense of the two images. This allows for a wide latitude in the eye-point offset during capture; the larger the spacing, the more vivid the stereo effect...up to a point. When you start to reach that point you'll find there's a lot of 'visual dissonance' in the stereo view and it makes the viewer uncomfortable.



MMcGrath
Registered: Apr 15, 2006
Total Posts: 2140
Country: United Kingdom

All,

thanks for the explanation. As I can never get the stereo pairs to "merge" when viewing I was interested to hear how that would affect the viewing.



MMcGrath
Registered: Apr 15, 2006
Total Posts: 2140
Country: United Kingdom

Harrier at KLAS.



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 3298
Country: United States

Here's a couple of different stereo-X pairs to illustrate my last post. Both were constructed from the same burst of still images taken while flying at 1000' over Elitch Gardens, an amusement park in downtown Denver. This is the 'Mister Twister' coaster.

The first pair is close to ideal: good 3-D effect, comfortable to view. It consists of frames 0297 and 0300 in a two-second burst at 6fps, so at the speed I was flying, the two frames were taken at an eye point spacing of about 50 feet.

The second pair is a stretch for the old brain: the 3-D effect is considerably more pronounced, but it's quite uncomfortable to view the image because moving your eye around the frame requires more of an adjustment in your eyes' convergence to maintain the illusion. The two frames I used here are 0300 and 0309, so the eye point spacing between the two frames is roughly 150'.



yipDog
Registered: Mar 06, 2012
Total Posts: 129
Country: United States

Staggerwing on Final
from Coolidge, AZ Breakfast Fly-In this morning.
1Dx w/500mm f4 II
ISO 100 f5 1/125 .6ND






yipDog
Registered: Mar 06, 2012
Total Posts: 129
Country: United States

And a Stearman
(same gear, settings…except f8)



yipDog
Registered: Mar 06, 2012
Total Posts: 129
Country: United States

And a Starduster…to complete my biplane trio! There were 3 other bipes but these were the coolest!
same gear and settings as Stearman



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 16064
Country: United States

Good analysis Nick! The verdict on P1 is pending, but I don't know if they have any better sales people than Blad in the final analysis. In the heavy equipment business we had marketing people and we had "order takers". Some people thought that Caterpillar only had order takers because our equipment was so superior to the competition. They were, of course, mistaken. Our equipment was superior, but it was also 60% more expensive than anyone else's. Every once in a while you had a client who just wouldn't consider buying anything that wasn't Cat, in those cases one was an order taker. In most situations, the client needed to be persuaded that there was at least a 60% benefit to choosing our product, so you had to know your stuff and believe in what you were selling.

Hasselblad lost their sales people a long, long time ago. Like many companies, they read and believed too much of their own press. When Rob Morgan (my rep) and Ernst Wildi faded from the scene, all that was left seemed to be people waiting around to do you a favor and let you buy their product. Anyone in sales knows that signals the beginning of the end. Certainly Blad doing that closed system thing was more evidence of an increasingly unmerited arrogance, mixed with a blatant disregard for the client's needs. More of, "we're Hasselblad, be happy we will even speak with you". I'm a good example, for decades I had five or six bodies, a dozen 12/24 backs, 20 lenses, accessories out the wazoo. Hasselblad regularly serviced my bodies and backs, mostly preventative maintenance, especially in the backs to prevent that light seal weakness they exhibited. I was very well known in the Hasselblad inner circles. When Rob retired and Professor Ernst left the company, no one ever contacted me again to keep up the relationship. Never got a call to coax me into Hasselblad digital, just dead silence. Few photographers had the breath and depth of their product I did, I would have considered me a sitting duck as a prospect for upgrading. In fact, a few years ago I initiated some dialogue with them and they repeatedly dropped the ball.

We'll see about P1, at these prices I have no intention of jumping in without a lot of confidence that it is the right thing to do, both in the product performance area and the support department. My experience tells me that if you can't get a company excited about selling their product to you, their support staff will be exponentially less interested in you. While I can get myself stoked about a camera that captures 200mb files with 13 stops of dynamic range, looking objectively at my market, my clients are very pleased with the product I produce for them. I constantly over deliver, as does my chosen equipment. Adding medium format digital will be something I do more for myself than for my clients, it's that desire to stretch to the next level of quality. Sure the clients will notice it and hopefully be impressed, but only incrementally. I think most of us here will agree that we strive for the end product we do, largely for our own satisfaction, and I think that is a very honorable motivation. When you go wading out into the surf, you're not doing it to make our jaws drop (certainly we love the accolades from people we respect), but you are doing it to one up your expectations.

The ball is firmly in Phase One's court now. I don't expect any special treatment, just a supplier who is confident in their product, and who is so excited about it, and getting it into the hands of a new client, that they can't wait to tell me about it and demonstrate why I can't go on shooting without one. If they care that much, I'm interested, if they don't, I don't. Weebeesee.

I like your "all over you like a bad rash" approach, it tells people you believe in what your selling. I'm confident in the product I am going to deliver to a client, but to this very day they can see that I am excited and enthusiastic about being able to create that product uniquely for them. That's the clincher, indifference rarely inspires confidence, particularly in a sales situation.

As far as your work, it's beautiful. I hope one of these days I can wade out into the surf with you and create something breathtaking.



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 16064
Country: United States

Wonderful Rob, just wonderful! Would you guys send me a case of that Arizona water?



yipDog
Registered: Mar 06, 2012
Total Posts: 129
Country: United States

Ha! Thanks Jim! Really appreciate the feedback!



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 3298
Country: United States

How about one more stereo pair, before I go out and brave the snow and cold? This is particularly successful in 3-D, I think.



nickjohnson
Registered: Sep 15, 2009
Total Posts: 747
Country: United Kingdom

Dear Jim,

Re “ …... wade out into the surf …..”. I fear that your recent conversation with Sir Donald may have suffered some translation “difficulties”. I must point out that I am a Butler and not a Surf. Further, my training and qualifications do not extend to aquatic activities. Accordingly, should you wish to avail yourself of some wooden board and rubber suit action, please be advised that my services will be limited to serving ice-cream and averting my gaze at the appropriate times.

Now, as for creating something nice (OK then, breathtaking) we need to offer something that you don't get in you own geographical locale. Something that is the essence of what we have up here in the “desolate North East” UK (that's a politicians gaff over here). How about this on the evening of midsummers day?

@ about 22:00hrs we have a sunset behind and to the left of these Fish Houses.




@ about 04:00hrs we have sunrise over the harbour entrance.



Oh, and just to fill in time we have a 40% crescent moon rise @ about 02:00hrs – over the sea.



Unless we are unlucky with full cloud cover, it never gets truly dark at that time of year. Plus plenty of light-painting and star trail opportunities too.



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 1851
Country: United States

Wonderful photographs Nick. The first image (i.e. 22:00hrs) is my personal favorite. The soft tonalities you're getting with the winter light is fantastic. Are those lobster traps? Certainly not something we see in Arizona - regardless of the season.



yipDog
Registered: Mar 06, 2012
Total Posts: 129
Country: United States

The Highwing Set
From Coolidge, AZ
1Dx 500mm f4 II
ISO 100 f5 .6ND 1/125







carrg1954
Registered: Jan 31, 2008
Total Posts: 1207
Country: Australia

nice images Nick



nrferguson
Registered: Apr 20, 2004
Total Posts: 1660
Country: United Kingdom

A good start to 2014! Although I have sold quite a number of photos on Alamy over the last two years (usually travel locations) I haven't sold an aircraft photo. Today I made my first sale - the Italian aerobatic team!
Niall



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 16064
Country: United States

It's funny Nick, experience reveals that there is a tremendous interest in great aviation images, everyone enjoys viewing them, but selling prints is another story entirely. The stock market reflects that to a degree, although my GA/Corporate aviation stock is always in the most downloaded category.



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 16064
Country: United States

Great images Rob! Did you own a series 1 500/4? I'd love your evaluation of the II in comparison. All of us who own the 1 love it and think it's razor sharp, the images you posted above indicate the II is better by an order of magnitude.



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 16064
Country: United States

Here's the unvarnished truth.....................



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