Mustang Air to Air: The Sequel
/forum/topic/600984/3873

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JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19260
Country: United States

Just not there yet for me Zim, not for my everyday livery while I'm working and towing my trailer around. I'm kind of noisy, smelly anachronism anyway.......



Wrei
Registered: Aug 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2939
Country: United States

"... noisy, smelly, dirty"

As a gearhead, well, that's my middle name. But then I was the guy who could show up for work in clean fatigues, walk by a jet on my way to the flight line and get smelly and dirty; and I loved it. Know how you tell a mechanic? Well, they are the ones washing their hands before they use the toilet.



JimClark
Registered: Nov 19, 2003
Total Posts: 2034
Country: United States

Flying Heritage Collection Sky Fair this past weekend














Full Gallery here
http://www.photosbyjimclark.com/Airplanes/AirShows/FHC-SkyFair-2014



Ryan Harris
Registered: Jun 02, 2013
Total Posts: 149
Country: United States

Brian and Glenn, that Mustang lives in San Antonio and belongs to Rod Lewis. She splits most of her time between the Lewis Energy hangars at San Antonio International, or the Lewis Ranch in Encinal.



Tim Ashton
Registered: Dec 27, 2006
Total Posts: 3211
Country: Australia

stevez wrote:
JWilsonphoto wrote:
Here's the C1 Pro discussion, as well as someone getting their rear chewed by a C1 moderator Which kind of struck me as a bit arrogant (and Phase One is definitely arrogant), the poor guy was just postulating that maybe the files are similar and might not take a complete revamp. I love all the billions spent on talking about customer service and how important the customer is, but when it comes down to the actual experience, except for maybe a few companies, like Tesla, the customer gets treated like a dufus more often than not.


http://forum.phaseone.com/En/viewtopic.php?f=46&t=16633

Seems like some of these ridiculously high end camera manufacturers operate on a modified version of that "I have expensive equipment, therefore I should have access" theorem. There's is our gear is so good, you should beg to buy it, then don't bother us after that with your inconsequential questions and problems. Let's see, um, that philosophy worked well for Kodak. I'd think that if you are making the most expensive camera gear in the world, you would want all the rest of your company attitude to match that high standard. But, what I think, and what I see, seem to be very divergent.


Sad, but true, Jim. Let me give you an example of how it's supposed to work...

On Friday morning, Peter and Hanna were driving their Tesla Model S through a remote part of Utah when the main breaker opened inside the sealed battery pack and they were stranded on the side of the road. Peter hiked to a place where he had cell service and called Tesla. Meanwhile, one of the other @TeslaRoadTrip cars happened to pass by and picked the two of them up, repairing to a guest ranch down the road a piece. Tesla arranged for a flatbed and had the car trailered (with its owners in the cab) 350 miles to the Denver service center, where they arrived long after closing time. Four technicians stayed late and prepped a replacement battery pack; they sent Peter and Hanna off to a nearby hotel (comped) in a loaner Model S whose nav was preprogrammed with the hotel's address; they replaced their car's inop battery pack with a new pack and updated the car's firmware (and replaced a sketchy left rear tire while they were at it); they washed the car and swapped it out with the loaner in the middle of the night. Yesterday morning Peter and Hanna got up, had breakfast, and resumed their journey to the east coast. Last I heard they were in Rapid City and making good progress.

Peter and Hanna are precisely zero dollars out of pocket and weren't even put behind schedule. This little exercise in warranty service and customer relations cost Tesla a bundle (the flatbed alone was nearly $2K!), but it engenders priceless goodwill in the larger scheme of things. And it's not an isolated incident: this sort of thing is SOP for Tesla.


It was that sort of attitude to looking after customers that put a John Deere on every (Well nearly) farm. Back in the late seventies my tractor suffered a failure 2 days into planting. The dealer had a loaner hooked up inside of four hours. The part needed to make my unit work was out of stock in Australia but not to worry. Deere in those days guaranteed parts within 72 hours whether they had to come out of Manneheim, Germany or Waterloo Iowa.

Simple folk like me used to call it the American way of doing business

Fast forward 26 years when some yobbo ripped the drivers side windscreen wiper off our Prius. No replacements available in Australia (Yes we are nearly at the end of the world) and Toyota Customer Relations proudly told me a new one out of Japan would be with me in three weeks!!!! Now that is progress!!!

Point I am making is Tesla is the future and it is why despite your elected members spending all their time scoring political points (as do ours) instead of providing leadership, the US economy will rise again

As for my Prius...ebay was my friend



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19260
Country: United States

Hi Tim,

Cat was pretty good with customer service during my 8.5 year tenure, but there was one particular territory that has Tesla like service, mine. When a part wasn't available out of my dealership. I'd hop in a plane and fly to the nearest Cat parts depot where it was available, pick it up and fly it back to my customer. Sometimes the part was too large to do that, so I had a number of trucking resources that would go pick up anything, any size, anywhere, and get it heading to the end user. I did all of that on my own nickel, but it served me well.

It's really more a matter of personal attitude and commitment. I could get sloppy now, I have more than enough assignments to take me through the next couple of years, but the habits are long formed and that's just kind of the way I roll. Once again, that mindset continues to serve me well.

Hope things are wonderful with you and yours!



Rodolfo Paiz
Registered: Jan 07, 2007
Total Posts: 9906
Country: United States

JWilsonphoto wrote:
I'm sure I would love it, but my schedule barely allows time to fill up at the QT, muchless a charging station. You and Zim do have me scratching my chin about an "S" vs. an Aston. I did pull up next to a brand new Vanquish early Friday morning and the sound was just sensational..........old habits are hard to break.


In addition to what Steve said, I'll comment that my Model S has a real-world "Rodolfo range" of 200 miles, when driven with no mercy and A/C on "arctic". Charging anywhere but at home doesn't even cross my mind unless I project driving over 200 miles in one day... because the EPA rating is 265 miles of range, and I can easily get that by merely slowing down a little and managing my energy a little more proactively.

In nearly four years of driving Teslas, I've never needed to stop in the middle of a regular day to charge somewhere. And road trips have a very comfortable drive-two-hours/charge-half-hour rhythm courtesy of Tesla's supercharger technology. The Tesla's range saves me at least one or two 10-minute stops at a gas station every week (about 12-15 hours a year).

I love the sound of a fine engine, and I've always loved the mechanics of driving a stick-shift. Now, I can tell you that the only sound more pleasant and rewarding than a great engine sound is no engine sound at all.

For you, I'd suggest waiting until you see exactly what the Model X brings to the table. The S is certainly not ideal for trailer-hauling... but then, if your current plans bear fruit as expected, you may not need that trailer for too much longer.



Tim Adams
Registered: Jan 01, 2004
Total Posts: 2887
Country: United States

astrobrian wrote:
Glenn Watson wrote:
Where were you flying Brian? I havent seen that Mustang before.

Glenn

We were participating in a memorial flyover in San Marcos and I was lucky enough to get a little bonus time with these guys. First time I had seen this 'Stang as well.


That's Rod Lewis Mustang.

Too late, question already answered.
Rod is planning on bringing 3 to Reno this year. Rare Bear, one of his Tigercats, and Sea Fury 232.



Wrei
Registered: Aug 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2939
Country: United States

Hmm, "drive-two-hours/charge-half-hour rhythm" may be "relaxing" driving the Pacific Coast Highway, but spending 6.5 hours charging batteries on I-10 from Texas to Phoenix is anything but "relaxing". How far can you go on a charge driving 80-85 mph?



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4082
Country: United States

Wrei, I drove 800 miles solo on Monday last week in the S, and arrived at my destination at sunset. At most of my stops, the car was ready to go before I was. You can cover some serious ground and still arrive in a relaxed state without the bone-weariness that comes from sitting in the saddle for too long at a stretch, not to mention the absence of low-frequency vibration that an electric drivetrain provides.

Also note that Edmunds drove the Models S from LA to NYC last week, in 67hr21min, a new EV record for the distance. Not too shabby...



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4082
Country: United States

To answer your initial question, cruising at 80-85mph reduces the nominal, EPA 5-cycle range of 265 miles, to about 200 real-world miles. If you find yourself running short of battery power remaining, you just slow down: unlike a gas-powered car, where inherent inefficiencies mask the true cost of aerodynamic drag, slowing down just 10 mph, from 80 to 70 mph, will add 15-20% to your range in a Model S.

Tesla's plans for the Model X (a crossover SUV) and the Model 3 (or Model III, as it seems they plan to mark it) are no secret: the first will tap into the USA's insatiable demand for SUVs and the latter will hit a price point that's competitive with any number of sporty, four-door sedans.

http://econ.st/UGy856



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2444
Country: United States

Interestingly, my better half and I have been discussing and scheming on a new car purchase in the next year. The more Zim and Rudolfo talk about their pleasurable experiences with their Tesla S's, the more the X model starts to move up my radar screen. Frankly, I wasn't sure I could afford a Tesla. But the more I think about my driving habits and needs, the closer I get to concluding I can't afford not to drive a Tesla.

One question for my friendly Tesla drug dealers (); how do you think an X would do in a typical Arizona summer? We just had 113* and 114* back to back. Any issues?

Keep the info coming. In the meantime, I'm off to spend $75 dollars on my Monday fill-up



Wrei
Registered: Aug 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2939
Country: United States

First, let me say I am not a Tesla basher, I admire what Elon Musk is doing on many technological fronts. I don't know if you have made the trek along I-10 from San Antonio to Phoenix (which I do a couple of times a year), it gets darn boring from Junction to Tuscon, and you just want to drive and get the miles behind you. My biggest slow down is my wife, who needs a 3 hour break. (That is pretty good, it use to be 2 hours.) Even she is willing to forego a break for an extended distance to get out of west Texas/New Mexico on those drives.

By the way, are you guys quoting the specs for the 60 kWh or 85 kWh?



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4082
Country: United States

Jeff, I just finished a 3200 mile road trip, passing through Las Vegas and Barstow both ways. Temperatures were in the 100's (I saw 108 on Baker's big thermometer) and the Model S handled it without flinching: I was comfortably cool and the car didn't impose any performance limits. Tesla's fundamental IP is in the care and feeding of large battery packs, so they know how to deal with climate extremes quite well. The battery pack is liquid-cooled and its internal temperature is maintained within a fairly narrow temperature band using active cooling (or heating, when it's cold out), something Nissan failed to do in the Leaf, which is why so many Leaf owners in Phoenix are frustrated with their cars: they're losing half their published range as the battery packs fry in the desert heat. Interestingly, pack heating and cabin climate control in sub-freezing weather diminishes range much more than pack cooling and A/C in summer; I hardly notice the consumption increase on even the hottest days.

Wrei, we're talking about the 85 kWh battery pack. It comes with an 8-year, unlimited mileage warranty, and the latest real-world data from Tesla owners (one guy I know personally has 94,000 miles on his S) suggest that at 8 years and 150,000 miles, the 85 kWh pack will still charge to at least 80% of its original capacity. Lithium ion batteries degrade slowly with both use and time, but the aging hit comes mostly up front, in the first year, and Tesla's battery management protocols ensure that the biggest battery killers--overcharging, and holding a high charge state at high internal temperatures--are not a factor.

I say it often, and I'll say it again here: the Model S is the best automobile I have ever owned, period...and by a country mile. People focus on the perceived shortcomings of driving an EV--not understanding that charging and range are non-issues for nearly all real-world driving patterns--and ignore its real advantages: the fantastic driving experience, low operating cost and extreme mechanical simplicity. Let this next fact sink in for a minute: my car's drivetrain has six moving parts.



Leviathor
Registered: Dec 20, 2005
Total Posts: 199
Country: United States

If I could buy one, Steve, I would. In a heartbeat.

I also finished a brief road trip last week. About 3300 miles from Fargo to Seattle and back by way of Glacier and Grand Teton. Mine was in a Saab 9-2X Aero, though. :P

I didn't get a lot of shots that trip, and this was the first (and maybe only) I'll bother to process:




stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4082
Country: United States

Hey, Leviathor, you know what they say: it only takes one. Wowser!



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4082
Country: United States

My partner went flying in the Sinus Flex this morning and I caught him taxiing back to the hangar: my first D810 frame for you, shot in DX mode with the 70-200mm f/2.8 VR + 1.7xTC.

The first version was converted to TIFF using Nikon's Capture NX-D software and then processed normally through LR5. The second version was converted to DNG using Adobe Digital Negative Converter v. 8.6 RC and then processed normally through LR5. Hmmm.

That's a lot of wing...



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19260
Country: United States

Probably should preorder an X. JR has about a dozen cars on his "collection" list, we should have something battery powered besides our golf cart.....



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4082
Country: United States

JWilsonphoto wrote:
Probably should preorder an X. JR has about a dozen cars on his "collection" list, we should have something battery powered besides our golf cart.....


That's a good idea, Jim, and the sooner the better: a $5K deposit gets you in line for a Model X with 'only' 12,000 US orders ahead of you, as of this date, plus all 1200 early-production Signature cars. The Sig list is closed, so unless there's a waiting list for Sigs (and you were to clear it), you'd be looking to take delivery no sooner than a year from now, by my SWAG. We'll see how fast they ramp up production on the X, but my guess is that it'll go a lot faster than the S production ramp: they were still only shipping a few cars a week when mine was delivered, a full three months after the first production car rolled off the line.



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4082
Country: United States

Gunfight at the OK Corral



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