Mustang Air to Air: The Sequel
/forum/topic/600984/3796

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ImperfectSense
Registered: Apr 05, 2010
Total Posts: 10
Country: United States

Spits, especially in Duxford, do change their colors very often, which can make it extremely difficult to tell what is "real" and what isn't. Our B-25 was restored there and it too changed paint, from an RCAF training airplane it became 'Grumpy,' the RAF B-25 that flew the most combat missions of WWII. We can't imagine her as anything else now, but it's not exactly an authentic paint job.

I do believe that is the BBMF bird around 2003. One clue is the big white modern helmet the pilot is wearing. Most Spitfire owners try to wear something a little more authentic to the time period, for instance the pilot of Historic Flight's Spitfire has a leather helmet with a hard shell inside, it's a balancing act between safety and authenticity. The BBMF however wear RAF helmets, and all of the other photos of MK356 flying during that time period show a white helmeted pilot. Add to this the fact that there are no photos of an RCAF painted 21 V after the BBMF bird changed its spots...

As for the rudder, certainly the surface area of it may be different depending on its shape, but the actual mounting hardware and size/shape of the vertical stabilizer remain the same, as far as I know no modifications to the airframe are required to switch between the two.



nickjohnson
Registered: Sep 15, 2009
Total Posts: 972
Country: United Kingdom

Yup, white helmet does it for me too.

So that will be one of these http://www.platinumfighters.com/#!spitfire-ix-mj730/c1kmj + clipped tips + “tidying” + paint + annual + …. It's not going to be inexpensive then.



Jan-Arie
Registered: Dec 24, 2005
Total Posts: 4053
Country: Netherlands

Hurricane
P51C



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4063
Country: United States

nickjohnson wrote:
Yup, white helmet does it for me too.

So that will be one of these http://www.platinumfighters.com/#!spitfire-ix-mj730/c1kmj + clipped tips + “tidying” + paint + annual + …. It's not going to be inexpensive then.
]


I think the last time the words 'inexpensive' and 'Spitfire' could legitimately be used in the same sentence was circa 1955.



Jan-Arie
Registered: Dec 24, 2005
Total Posts: 4053
Country: Netherlands

stevez wrote:
nickjohnson wrote:
Yup, white helmet does it for me too.

So that will be one of these http://www.platinumfighters.com/#!spitfire-ix-mj730/c1kmj + clipped tips + “tidying” + paint + annual + …. It's not going to be inexpensive then.
]


I think the last time the words 'inexpensive' and 'Spitfire' could legitimately be used in the same sentence was circa 1955.


Yeah back then you could buy a crated one for a couple of pounds..



Razor17
Registered: Oct 08, 2012
Total Posts: 465
Country: United States

Glenn Watson wrote:
Hi Lynn:
I'm not positive but I think thats Lake Waxahachie.

Glenn



Thanks, its on the East of 35 and I'm on the West side...

Lynn



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 18972
Country: United States

Whatever the Spitfire intricacies are, turns out that is the airframe our partner's father flew in WWII. As pointed out, these aircraft have gone through so many mods, restorations, iterations over the years.



NightOwl Cat
Registered: Feb 19, 2007
Total Posts: 8899
Country: United States

Glad the bird strike wasn't more serious. Maybe put a store bought feather in a window then, since you can't paint one on?

ImperfectSense wrote:
Hahaha, I know just what you mean! We had a bird strike on the wing once, put a big dent in it, and we tried to talk the owner into letting us put a bird kill marking on the airplane... Our preferred idea was to paint a little feather in the kitten's mouth. Unfortunately that idea "didn't fly"



Chris Luvara
Registered: Nov 17, 2006
Total Posts: 145
Country: United States

ImperfectSense wrote:
Hahaha, I know just what you mean! We had a bird strike on the wing once, put a big dent in it, and we tried to talk the owner into letting us put a bird kill marking on the airplane... Our preferred idea was to paint a little feather in the kitten's mouth. Unfortunately that idea "didn't fly"


While we were putting my airplane back together after a birdstrike a friend of mine put this little sticker on. 4 more and I'm an Ace... hope I never get there!





JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 18972
Country: United States

Interesting topic. Texas has plenty of thermal circling Turkey Vultures. When I see them I always wonder if a hit in just the right spot would take out a strut.



Wrei
Registered: Aug 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2913
Country: United States

I actually see more of the Black Vulture here in Central Texas






than the Turkey Vulture







An interesting point that I have seen is the black vulture waits for the turkey vulture to tear open the carcass for them. The black vulture beak is not as tough as the turkey vulture, and the black vulture will bully the turkey vulture away when they are ready to feed.


nickjohnson
Registered: Sep 15, 2009
Total Posts: 972
Country: United Kingdom

Ah yes bird strikes. Having seen the damage they can do, not much would surprise me now on that score.

Back in the day I remember doing a particular Harrier tailplane repair. The bird had gone through the leading edge – not much of deal since the LE was only a thin closing section – but then it had bulged and peeled the top and bottom skins, which where 1/10th of an inch alloy at that point. After that the darn thing still had the energy to dent the front spar, which at that point was ¼ of an inch alloy section. Fortunately the hit was just outboard of the join section between the centre box and the flying part of the tailplane, so we just built on a new “half” and sent it back out to play some more.



RobMoser
Registered: Sep 04, 2007
Total Posts: 865
Country: United States

JWilsonphoto wrote:
Interesting topic. Texas has plenty of thermal circling Turkey Vultures. When I see them I always wonder if a hit in just the right spot would take out a strut.


A friend of mine took one of them more or less at the wing root of the left wing. It left a gigantic dent which did nothing for the aerodynamics.

Rob



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4063
Country: United States

JWilsonphoto wrote:
Interesting topic. Texas has plenty of thermal circling Turkey Vultures. When I see them I always wonder if a hit in just the right spot would take out a strut.


Back in the day, at the now-defunct Black Forest Gliderport in Colorado, somebody was flying a Schweitzer SGS 1-34 single seater in a thermal with a golden eagle. Now, raptors are normally perfectly willing to share a thermal with a glider so long as you don't sneak up on them from behind. In fact, I think they take secret pleasure in outclimbing us pretenders.

I wasn't there, but in this case it was said the glider pilot harassed the bird, over and over, to the point that it turned and stooped on him. Justified or not, it was a bad day for the bird: it buried itself in the leading edge of the aluminum wing all the way back to the main spar and was killed. A bad day for the pilot: in addition to an in-flight emergency and a hefty repair bill, the state fish and game people were not amused that he had killed a golden, which is a protected species in Colorado.



NightOwl Cat
Registered: Feb 19, 2007
Total Posts: 8899
Country: United States

I was up at the Dayton Aviation Heritage National Park here a couple years ago, and was taking photos of the planes passing overhead. Caught the first one with two turkey vultures around the plane. Had sent it to my husband, who passed it on to someone else. I got a request back through him for the full size version to use for safety briefings.

Second shot I took at the air show this year, large flock of birds popped up around the inbound Delta that I was practicing my panning with.



Wrei
Registered: Aug 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2913
Country: United States

Of course the airways become more challenging in the spring and fall in Central Texas with all the bird migrations.






FlyingPhotog
Registered: May 09, 2008
Total Posts: 4775
Country: United States

I can still remember the first time a vulture dove to miss me in a 172...

I thought sure we'd just missed another plane. Very un-nerving.



Warus
Registered: Apr 29, 2013
Total Posts: 20
Country: Australia

Few from Temora in Australia































Colin Giersberg
Registered: Jun 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2264
Country: United States

David, welcome to the MA2A family. Hang around and enjoy the ride.



Colin Giersberg
Registered: Jun 01, 2008
Total Posts: 2264
Country: United States

Liz, welcome as well. I look forward to seeing more and I enjoyed the discussion on the Spitfire.



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