Mustang Air to Air: The Sequel
/forum/topic/600984/3652

1       2       3              3652      
3653
       3654              4532       4533       end

nickjohnson
Registered: Sep 15, 2009
Total Posts: 988
Country: United Kingdom

Dear Jim,

Re “ …... wade out into the surf …..”. I fear that your recent conversation with Sir Donald may have suffered some translation “difficulties”. I must point out that I am a Butler and not a Surf. Further, my training and qualifications do not extend to aquatic activities. Accordingly, should you wish to avail yourself of some wooden board and rubber suit action, please be advised that my services will be limited to serving ice-cream and averting my gaze at the appropriate times.

Now, as for creating something nice (OK then, breathtaking) we need to offer something that you don't get in you own geographical locale. Something that is the essence of what we have up here in the “desolate North East” UK (that's a politicians gaff over here). How about this on the evening of midsummers day?

@ about 22:00hrs we have a sunset behind and to the left of these Fish Houses.




@ about 04:00hrs we have sunrise over the harbour entrance.



Oh, and just to fill in time we have a 40% crescent moon rise @ about 02:00hrs – over the sea.



Unless we are unlucky with full cloud cover, it never gets truly dark at that time of year. Plus plenty of light-painting and star trail opportunities too.



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2444
Country: United States

Wonderful photographs Nick. The first image (i.e. 22:00hrs) is my personal favorite. The soft tonalities you're getting with the winter light is fantastic. Are those lobster traps? Certainly not something we see in Arizona - regardless of the season.



yipDog
Registered: Mar 06, 2012
Total Posts: 148
Country: United States

The Highwing Set
From Coolidge, AZ
1Dx 500mm f4 II
ISO 100 f5 .6ND 1/125







carrg1954
Registered: Jan 31, 2008
Total Posts: 1262
Country: Australia

nice images Nick



nrferguson
Registered: Apr 20, 2004
Total Posts: 2452
Country: United Kingdom

A good start to 2014! Although I have sold quite a number of photos on Alamy over the last two years (usually travel locations) I haven't sold an aircraft photo. Today I made my first sale - the Italian aerobatic team!
Niall



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19268
Country: United States

It's funny Nick, experience reveals that there is a tremendous interest in great aviation images, everyone enjoys viewing them, but selling prints is another story entirely. The stock market reflects that to a degree, although my GA/Corporate aviation stock is always in the most downloaded category.



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19268
Country: United States

Great images Rob! Did you own a series 1 500/4? I'd love your evaluation of the II in comparison. All of us who own the 1 love it and think it's razor sharp, the images you posted above indicate the II is better by an order of magnitude.



yipDog
Registered: Mar 06, 2012
Total Posts: 148
Country: United States

Thanks! No, actually the 500mm f4 mk2 was my first big lens. Got it in Dec 2012. I also have the 300mm f2.8 Mk2 which I picked up a couple months later.
I have held Jay's 500 and 300 which are mkI's and the weight difference is rather noticeable. Jay and I shoot side by side a lot and IQ-wise I haven't noticed a huge difference but the 1Dmk4 he uses has a higher pixel density and the hands of a master operating it along with his processing expertise. At some point maybe it would be worth putting the lenses on the same body to do a real comparison. Could do with and without TC's, various apertures, and in my studio with test charts, etc.



JWilsonphoto wrote:
Great images Rob! Did you own a series 1 500/4? I'd love your evaluation of the II in comparison. All of us who own the 1 love it and think it's razor sharp, the images you posted above indicate the II is better by an order of magnitude.



FlyingPhotog
Registered: May 09, 2008
Total Posts: 4775
Country: United States

Living in the desert, it's not unusual to see a Bobcat...



FlyingPhotog
Registered: May 09, 2008
Total Posts: 4775
Country: United States

"A mile of road can take you a mile, but a mile of runway can take you anywhere!"



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2444
Country: United States

JWilsonphoto wrote:
It's funny Nick, experience reveals that there is a tremendous interest in great aviation images, everyone enjoys viewing them, but selling prints is another story entirely. The stock market reflects that to a degree, although my GA/Corporate aviation stock is always in the most downloaded category.


I enjoy reading Joe McNally's blog and this mornings post seems appropriate to MA2A's comments about the stock photography market and the vagaries of professional photography in general. Enjoy.

http://www.joemcnally.com/blog/2014/01/06/off-to-a-rip-roaring-start/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+joemcnally+%28Joe+McNally%27s+Blog%29



nickjohnson
Registered: Sep 15, 2009
Total Posts: 988
Country: United Kingdom

Jeff W. wrote:
Wonderful photographs Nick. The first image (i.e. 22:00hrs) is my personal favorite. The soft tonalities you're getting with the winter light is fantastic. Are those lobster traps? Certainly not something we see in Arizona - regardless of the season.



Thanks Jeff. Yes, I've always understood that they are lobster pots – I have no idea if they might trap a crab as well. I find it deeply comforting that you don't have those pots in Arizona! At least that's one neuron I still have working.
The winter light around here can be very good. The harbour / cove in the three images is all in shadow – so the processing is biased toward a pleasing result rather than technical accuracy. Some days we get continuous overcast, which is generally hopeless – except when very bright – which is excellent for rock formation abstracts. Other days we get clear blue and white puffy – that's great because with the sun so low in the sky, happy hour lasts all day. Down side is that “day” at this time of year is only about 8 hrs at best.



tom cardin
Registered: Mar 08, 2005
Total Posts: 1991
Country: United States

My Son, is building a Bobcat, with over 100 inches of wing span. He is taking it to a scale show, this weekend, so it can be seen before covering.
Full scale is very pretty.


Tom



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19268
Country: United States

Joe is a hoot isn't he Jeff. I guess I should be (and I was) thankful, my last 2013 check from Getty was $1562.37, representing about six weeks of sales. What Joe describes is reality. I have no idea what his bottom line is annually, but as you mentioned a page or two ago, he has overhead. The guys that shot for Geographic had big budgets thrown at them, but the logistics and time involved on those assignments ate those numbers up pretty quickly. The Geographic has always been great at figuring what an assignment might run, but factoring in that the photographer gets a bump from being a "National Geographic Photographer", so the shooters didn't deposit what you might imagine. The downside for Geographic shooters has always been that they spend much of their career in a tree warding off malaria, waiting for the shot that will save them the verbal abuse festival that Geographic editors are so famous for, along with getting them selected for the next eight months in a sleeping bag at 19,000' assignment. While those guys are out doing what they do, assignments of all denominations are being awarded around the world, some of which are actually lucrative for the photographers involved. Geographic guys understand the in's and out of landing editorial assignments, but they are pretty much clueless when it relates to agency and corporate work. In addition, they've been out of pocket so much of their career that they don't have the relationships and the network.

Oddly, assistants aren't terribly expensive, 200 to 1,000 bucks a day depending upon skill level. The low end being someone who has the "skill" to schlep bags and set up light stands, the upper number is someone who will unpack all your gear, then do a pretty competent job of getting the first composition lit, while the photographer stretches and sips his or her Cappuccino, arriving an hour or two after everyone else. The best way to build a relationship with an assistant that you feel has the chops to be a great photographer down the line, is to hire them full time. The upside is they'll always be available, and you know what you're getting. The downside is, you're training someone to snatch your client list once they have enough knowledge to shoot for them. That might seem harsh, but it's reality, and the scenario repeats itself over and over. Can't blame the assistants, anyone with any moxie wants their own gig, you just have to decide if you're willing to put yours at risk to lighten your load for a time. A single decent full time assistant will add a minimum of 50K to your expenses and double the expense portion of every quote. Gone are the days that agencies preferred that you have multiple assistants because they billed the end client a percentage of the cost of the shoot, more cost meant more money to them. That isn't how it's done anymore, the market place has pared their pricing to the bone. In many cases an assistant will cost you the assignment. Editorially speaking, just look at the aviation publications who used to hire freelancers for their feature articles every month, in many cases the editors are now the photographers as well. FLYING, Plane & Pilot, Pilot Journal, Warbird Digest, the list goes on and on. They all represent business that is no longer there for the freelance shooter, except for an occasional stock image sale and that won't float the boat.


I am very grateful for the steady flow of assignments that I'm blessed with, but you all are witnesses to the vigilance it takes to keep the pipeline full. One has to be as adept at knocking on doors and maximizing every relationship, as you do being technically competent.The photographer with loads of talent, great equipment, and lots of time on his or her hands has been a common thread running through our industry, and long before digital made virtually everyone a pro.



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4084
Country: United States

SpaceX Falcon 9 transfer mission just had a successful launch: T +00:08:30 right now and all looks good.

http://www.spacex.com/webcast/

[Update: it was really cool watching the engine bell of the second stage rocket motor start to glow red/orange after they lit the second stage.]



PDumm
Registered: Oct 17, 2011
Total Posts: 204
Country: United States

D4s?? A Development Announcement??

http://www.nikonusa.com/en/About-Nikon/Press-Room/index.page

Scroll down on the left. second box.



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19268
Country: United States

Great catch Paul! They are holding this one close to the vest before next week's release. The thing you can count on with Nikon, is that it will hit the streets very soon after the debut. Looking forward to hearing more about this one!



MMcGrath
Registered: Apr 15, 2006
Total Posts: 2649
Country: United Kingdom

Interesting development re the D4s. Would explain why the UK price of the D4 has fallen recently and why select UK retailers are offering an additional £500 trade in from Nikon against the purchase of a D4.



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19268
Country: United States

You have to hand it to Nikon. They manufacture, announce and put it on the shelf for sale, all within a reasonable time frame. Might have something to do with the fact that they aren't chasing the porn market with 52 kinds of video products.............."just sayin' " I wish them every success, and I plan to help them a little with that.



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2444
Country: United States

DASVIDANIYA

Transaero Airlines Boeing 777 departing LAX for Moscow in the last light of the day.



1       2       3              3652      
3653
       3654              4532       4533       end