Mustang Air to Air: The Sequel
/forum/topic/600984/3649

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Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2444
Country: United States

Absolutely loving' that C-5 photograph Jay. What a satisfying experience for you with the Lt. Col.

Regarding New Yorker article link Zim posted; I had an interesting experience during lunch. I visited my local camera shop to pick-up a new/used 45* prism viewfinder for my Hasselblad. While there, I was nosing around the various counters and found the new Sony a7R. If Henri Cartier-Bresson were around today, I think this might be his camera and should give Leica a very serious run for the money? 36.4 MP full frame sensor and mirrorless. The size of Zim's OM-D EM-5 and will easily adapt to nearly any lens on the planet. FWIW, I think that Sony has set a new course for professionals and serious amateurs with this camera. Besides all the innovation, they are telling prospective buyers, you can buy this camera and keep using the glass you already have and love.

Unlike the historic posturing of the big camera companies like Canon, Nikon, etc; Sony is not trying to tell buyers that they need to make a wholesale equipment change to use this new body. Sure they will have Zeiss make some lenses for this camera over time, but you don't have to buy them to maximize the potential of the camera. I read a recent article that predicts that only Canon, Nikon and Sony will be left standing after the current market trends/shifts. Olympus, Minolta, etc will go the way of all flesh and disappear.

Don't get me wrong, I believe there will always be a niche market (Phase One) for true professionals and their equipment needs. That being said, I think what was started with the micro 4/3rds cameras from Olympus, Samsung, Fujifilm, etc is quickly evolving and Sony's a7R may ultimately serve as the prototype design that will bridge the gap between the iPhone shooters and the true professionals.

Very interesting stuff. Now how do I load that Tri-X into my 500CM again?



msalvetti
Registered: Dec 20, 2003
Total Posts: 3167
Country: United States

Here's an iPhone shot from this morning. My daughter's hockey team had an hour of practice ice at Fenway. Which turned into 2 hours because the snow was so heavy the kids spent a lot of time clearing the ice with push shovels, and they cancelled the rest of the events on the rink for today. We were lucky to get on.



Of course I also shot with the MkIV and video with a Panasonic G5. Just haven't had time to dig into those files.

Mark



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4083
Country: United States

FlyingPhotog wrote:
Here's your "warm fuzzy" for the day...


Warms the cockles of this old heart, for sure, Jay!



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4083
Country: United States

Jeff W. wrote:
Absolutely loving' that C-5 photograph Jay. What a satisfying experience for you with the Lt. Col.

Regarding New Yorker article link Zim posted; I had an interesting experience during lunch. I visited my local camera shop to pick-up a new/used 45* prism viewfinder for my Hasselblad. While there, I was nosing around the various counters and found the new Sony a7R. If Henri Cartier-Bresson were around today, I think this might be his camera and should give Leica a very serious run for the money? 36.4 MP full frame sensor and mirrorless. The size of Zim's OM-D EM-5 and will easily adapt to nearly any lens on the planet. FWIW, I think that Sony has set a new course for professionals and serious amateurs with this camera. Besides all the innovation, they are telling prospective buyers, you can buy this camera and keep using the glass you already have and love.


Yes, this is very interesting, Jeff. What does your research tell you about that new Sony sensor?

My Oly is the OM-D EM-1, by the way.



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2444
Country: United States

stevez wrote:

Yes, this is very interesting, Jeff. What does your research tell you about that new Sony sensor?

My Oly is the OM-D EM-1, by the way.


DxOMark ranked the Sony a7R sensor on par with the D800 models - not bad company to be keeping. While it's still new to the US market, it is producing some amazing images. Search through FM's "Alternative Gear & Lenses" forum and you'll find numerous threads about the a7 and a7R cameras. Lots of great photos.

The build quality appeared top notch to me and "went well to hand". While I'm not sure it is the right platform to strap a piece of 600mm L glass to, it sure would be a tremendous asset in many other situations. Based upon much of what I've read on FM and Luminous Landscape, folks that have been hanging onto their high-end Leica glass for many years have hit the jackpot with the a7R. While it isn't a perfect match, it is apparently darn close.

As a travel camera mated with a Leica-sized lens, you'd be in hog heaven. Folks are also producing great images using old Olympus OM Zuiko, Minolta MC Rokkor, Voigtlander Nokton and other rangefinder type lenses (http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1254258/28). Unlike the nearly $8,000 you'll pay for a Leica 24mm f/1.4 Summilux-M Aspherical Lens, you can apparently pick up some great old lenses for relatively cheap prices.



bobl
Registered: Sep 08, 2003
Total Posts: 2793
Country: United States

Sort of air related...

Sunset at Waldport 1-2-14



Tim Adams
Registered: Jan 01, 2004
Total Posts: 2887
Country: United States

Jeff W. wrote:
stevez wrote:

Yes, this is very interesting, Jeff. What does your research tell you about that new Sony sensor?

My Oly is the OM-D EM-1, by the way.


DxOMark ranked the Sony a7R sensor on par with the D800 models - not bad company to be keeping. While it's still new to the US market, it is producing some amazing images. Search through FM's "Alternative Gear & Lenses" forum and you'll find numerous threads about the a7 and a7R cameras. Lots of great photos.

The build quality appeared top notch to me and "went well to hand". While I'm not sure it is the right platform to strap a piece of 600mm L glass to, it sure would be a tremendous asset in many other situations. Based upon much of what I've read on FM and Luminous Landscape, folks that have been hanging onto their high-end Leica glass for many years have hit the jackpot with the a7R. While it isn't a perfect match, it is apparently darn close.

As a travel camera mated with a Leica-sized lens, you'd be in hog heaven. Folks are also producing great images using old Olympus OM Zuiko, Minolta MC Rokkor, Voigtlander Nokton and other rangefinder type lenses (http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1254258/28). Unlike the nearly $8,000 you'll pay for a Leica 24mm f/1.4 Summilux-M Aspherical Lens, you can apparently pick up some great old lenses for relatively cheap prices.


The Sony and the Nikon are using the same sensor, so they should be the same.



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2444
Country: United States

Tim Adams wrote:
The Sony and the Nikon are using the same sensor, so they should be the same.


That has been my understanding Tim. Sony builds Nikon's sensors and Canon builds their own. So as you say, it should not be surprising that the a7R and D800 score nearly identical. Like the D800E, the a7R does not have an anti-aliasing filter.



astrobrian
Registered: Sep 27, 2012
Total Posts: 827
Country: United States

JWilsonphoto wrote:
I don't know if I mentioned it, but we're involved in a deal funding a new NASCAR track at an undisclosed location in the South. NASCAR has never been high on my radar as a subject (but I'm very excited now!!!! ) There are obviously lots of other types of events, racing and otherwise, that take place at those facilities. Let me say that securing a credential shouldn't be a problem for any of the family here, and yes, I'm doing the progress photography……… More as it unfolds.


As a certifiable NASCAR nut, you have my attention sir.



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2444
Country: United States

…...



NightOwl Cat
Registered: Feb 19, 2007
Total Posts: 9311
Country: United States

little bit of snow on the ground, and a slight chill to the air....



ELinder
Registered: Feb 14, 2010
Total Posts: 1070
Country: United States

I'll trade you our +10F and over a foot of snow for your -2F.

Erich



msalvetti
Registered: Dec 20, 2003
Total Posts: 3167
Country: United States

Stay warm Laura! I'm going back out, as the snow up here has just about stopped. We probably have around one foot, but it was so cold the snow is really light. We were lucky - maybe 10-20 miles from here some towns got two feet. It was around 0F last night, and now it's 7F but windy.

In this part of the country, it's usually not very cold when it snows. They are talking about this being one of the coldest major storms on record. Tonight there are forecasts for -35F in northern NH, we'll probably get down to -5. Warming up by Sunday, and the next storm Sunday night into Monday is expected to be rain.

Mark



Jeff W.
Registered: Feb 09, 2008
Total Posts: 2444
Country: United States

NightOwl Cat wrote:
little bit of snow on the ground, and a slight chill to the air....


Stay warm and safe Laura. Same to all my cold MA2A friends. We are much blessed here in sunny AZ.



FlyingPhotog
Registered: May 09, 2008
Total Posts: 4775
Country: United States

Missed the earlier blurb regarding NASCAR Jim...

I know a guy who used to work in that world.



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19267
Country: United States

stevez wrote:
Jim, my take on this article is that the 'dumbing down' of photography is analogous to what has happened to audio recordings with the advent of MP3 players and file sharing, or the publishing industry with the rise of Amazon and eBooks. For the vast majority of the population, MP3's and eBooks are plenty good enough; for the vast majority of the population, Facebook and Instagram are just fine, too, thank you very much.

The music industry is still reeling from the implications of digital file sharing; photography is undergoing a similar upheaval. Meanwhile, people like you and me and the rest of the good folks here on MA2A are able to take advantage of the rapid advances in imaging technology to create ever more stunning imagery with today's ever more capable gear. The fact that there are still clients out there who value your dedication and the quality product you deliver is a testament to an eternal truth: cream rises to the top.

I sit here in my studio with twenty large photo prints of my favorite images staring down at me from the walls. There is still nothing in the digital world to match the experience of coming face to face with a large photo print, or handling a beautifully printed and bound book, or hearing a symphony orchestra perform live in one of the great concert halls. But the democratization of information guarantees the ascendancy of 'good enough'; and the best we can hope for is that there will always remain an audience, however small, for the truly great products of those human endeavors that first arose and reached maturity in the physical world, rather than in cyberspace.



Exxxxaaaactly!



JWilsonphoto
Registered: Jan 16, 2002
Total Posts: 19267
Country: United States

"And they're off….!" First shoot of 2014 is under my belt and on the way to the EII archive vault



Jan-Arie
Registered: Dec 24, 2005
Total Posts: 4094
Country: Netherlands

Good Luck this year Jim that great things may happen..



stevezzzz
Registered: Aug 01, 2010
Total Posts: 4083
Country: United States

I flew down to KAPA with a friend who was picking up an airplane there and on the way home took advantage of the warm temperatures to open the door for a little air-to-ground photography of downtown Denver.

This is a stereo-X pair of the May D&F Tower and the 16th Street Mall.



nickjohnson
Registered: Sep 15, 2009
Total Posts: 986
Country: United Kingdom

Just a small note about one of my most difficult projects of last year. Thea got me a photo event ticket for the flower festival at Durham Cathedral. They opened up at 05:30 and turfed us out at 07:30. So it was crank the 17-40 all the way out wide – try and point the camera away from the other 'togs – and concentrate on getting good exposures. That turned out to be the right plan for me. Plenty of time to repent at leisure about the converging verticals! So several months later I've managed to get a few to look nice. Many thanks to Jim and others for the on going interiors tutorial – I knew this stuff was hard to do – and it is!




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