1st White Seamless Portrait.
/forum/topic/1175642/0



canonrick1
Registered: May 28, 2009
Total Posts: 155
Country: United States

Looking to get some feedback on my 1st white seamless portrait. Just began shooting with studio lights about a month ago. Props must go out to Zach Arias and his website and video at Creative Live. I have corrected a few nits but as always I tend to see more after a couple of day. Wanted to hear from some of you with a lot more experience and share with me anything that you want, thick skin.

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to the FM members.

Thanks



Steve Wylie
Registered: Feb 13, 2007
Total Posts: 1171
Country: United States

Not a bad first attempt at all. When shot against a blowout white backdrop, sometimes you need a bit more contrast in the subjects, too. Also, don't be afraid to add a bit more directionality to your light placement on the subjects, especially with a small group like this. Good job, though!



canonrick1
Registered: May 28, 2009
Total Posts: 155
Country: United States

Steve,
Thanks very much for your comments. I used Softlghter 60" for my key light. If you mean it's a bit overexposed struggled with that in post but I'll develop it again and look to adjust an image with a bit more contrast.

Thanks again.

Rick



Jon Uhler
Registered: Dec 08, 2006
Total Posts: 2439
Country: United States

Lighting is really flat as mentioned.

Good start.



Steve Wylie
Registered: Feb 13, 2007
Total Posts: 1171
Country: United States

Rick, your subjects aren't overexposed; if anything, they're a bit under. Right now, the backdrop is very much brighter than your subjects, so they need to pop a bit more to compete with it. They need just a little more light, some more directionality to the light (as I mentioned above), and a tad more contrast in post. Keep workin' it!



Steady Hand
Registered: Dec 03, 2007
Total Posts: 15596
Country: United States

Steve Wylie wrote:
Rick, your subjects aren't overexposed; if anything, they're a bit under. Right now, the backdrop is very much brighter than your subjects, so they need to pop a bit more to compete with it. They need just a little more light, some more directionality to the light (as I mentioned above), and a tad more contrast in post. Keep workin' it!


+1

My Suggestion: Forget the background...look at the faces and skin tone. Adjust for that.



rbritt1
Registered: Jan 24, 2011
Total Posts: 16
Country: United States

I agree with above C&C, more light at shoot, or more contrast in post will enhance your result. Great job for your first.



canonrick1
Registered: May 28, 2009
Total Posts: 155
Country: United States

Thanks to everyone for you input and encouragement. All the best this Holiday Season.

Rick



canonrick1
Registered: May 28, 2009
Total Posts: 155
Country: United States

Here's an update hopefully with what Steve, Steady Hand, and John had commented on. Such a newb with this. I hope I'm either on the right track or still clueless.

Thanks for any further feedback.

Rick



Steve Wylie
Registered: Feb 13, 2007
Total Posts: 1171
Country: United States

100% better. Don't you agree?



Steve Wylie
Registered: Feb 13, 2007
Total Posts: 1171
Country: United States

One more piece of feedback for you: look at the sides of the head of the boy in the middle. See the white light behind his cheeks? That's either blowback reflecting from the white seamless or spill from the lights that light the seamless. In this particular case, it works okay, but as a rule, you'd want to guard against that. Blowback is often what robs the subjects of essential contrast. FYI...

This looks really good now.



canonrick1
Registered: May 28, 2009
Total Posts: 155
Country: United States

Steve,
Yea I did notice the blowback. I tried to just use softboxes with the covers removed to control the light. Next time I'll have to move them further away or make some gobos or flags to block some of the blowback if it is coming from that. I can also lower the light intensity. I was trying to keep the backdrop lit 1-2 stops higher than the subject light.

Thanks again for all the feedback.



Allynb
Registered: Mar 17, 2009
Total Posts: 671
Country: United States

A little less fill will give you a nice soft contrast, delineating the dimension a bit more, otherwise, good first attempt



Takira71A
Registered: Sep 10, 2011
Total Posts: 66
Country: Canada

Rick, your 'second edit' is *** Definitely *** a very nice improvement! (You learn quickly!).
--
If I could make a couple more 'subtle' suggestions (To the excellent guidance, that you have already been given thus far)...
--
>> I was trying to keep the backdrop lit 1-2 stops higher than the subject light.

Rick, there should be no need for you to overexpose your White Seamless Background by so much (1-2 F-Stops). Try reducing this to between 1/2 -1 Stop over your 'Main'.
(Like they say... 'Sometimes Less is MORE').

By overexposing your Background over your Main by such a large amount... You are bouncing an Enormous amount of 'Stray Light' around your Studio or Shooting Area. (Don't worry... I too used to be guilty of this 'Rookie Mistake' also!).

As previously noted by Steve, all that this does... Is rob your subjects of contrast and 'washes them out' (To a varying degree)...
--
Rick... I might also choose to add a just a small amount of 'Additional Exposure' to the area in front of your subjects in the foreground (This of course is more a matter of 'Personal Taste').

If you should choose to do this in the future... You of course could do this by perhaps 'Feathering' your Main Light, 'Scrimming' your Main Light or perhaps even looking at this area in 'In Post'.
--
You of course, could also use an additional light to accomplish this (But we won't go there... As it is a Very, Very 'Slippery Slope!')... . Smile.

I still remember to this day... Seeing the work of a famous Photographer -- Who used over *** 20 Lights *** (REALLY!) on just one Subject (for a Portrait).

I guess because he could afford so many lights, that he felt that he had to use them *** ALL*** at the Same Time! (Yes... The pic was WAY, WAY 'Over Lit' IMHO)... Enough said!
--
Rick... Keep up the good work and KEEP Shooting!!!
--
-Tim.
______



canonrick1
Registered: May 28, 2009
Total Posts: 155
Country: United States

Tim,
Thanks for comments. I was using the info. from Zach A. on the 1-2 stops. What I forgot to factor in was the distance of my subject to the backdrop. I have a much tighter space, garage, than he used in his video. I should of relied on the feedback from the back of my camera when it first goes to white. The grayish foreground did bother me a little and did dodge it a little bit from the original exposure. I'll continue to work on it.

Merry Christmas and thanks again for your comments.

Rick



Takira71A
Registered: Sep 10, 2011
Total Posts: 66
Country: Canada

Hi Rick...
No problem. You of course are more than welcome!
Thank-you for the kind words also. Greatly appreciated!
--
As a 'Big Time' animal lover, I bet that your dog is a great, loyal companion!
(She looks like she has 'tons' of character!!!).
--
Take care. Best regards.
All the Best!
--
-Tim.
______