Canon 600EX-RT
/forum/topic/1165563/0



Zenon Char
Registered: May 15, 2008
Total Posts: 755
Country: Canada

Looking at this and the ST-E3-RT as a system. I just don't see a convenient way to fire the flash/flashes when using my Sekonic L-358. The way I understand the L-358 transmitter module will only work with with Sekonics own system and PW.

I see the ST-E3-RT has a remote release terminal. Does anyone know if you plug a 3rd party receiver into the terminal if it will fire the flashes?

I'd be interested in any other options/solutions out there.



ukphotographer
Registered: Dec 12, 2009
Total Posts: 1275
Country: United Kingdom

It doesn't seem sensible to require A.N.Other radio system to trigger the Canon one - not sensible at all. It appears that must be the case.

At the moment you are restricted to using the system as it is intended, that of setting everything from the on camera flash or controller.



ukphotographer
Registered: Dec 12, 2009
Total Posts: 1275
Country: United Kingdom

Triggering the camera remotely is the solution.... but then you need to walk back to the camera to change the setting for the flashes you were (probably) near.

How about using the self-timer?



Zenon Char
Registered: May 15, 2008
Total Posts: 755
Country: Canada

That sounds like a pretty good idea.



Zenon Char
Registered: May 15, 2008
Total Posts: 755
Country: Canada

Got a good suggestion from POTN and found a couple of videos on you tube on it. Carry the ST-E3-RT with you, use the test flash button to fire the flash and adjust as required on the spot.



ukphotographer
Registered: Dec 12, 2009
Total Posts: 1275
Country: United Kingdom

...but, the on camera controller will be the thing which transmits ISO and any TTL or A settings you might be using, so those would be out. You'd end up just using Manual, which is no bad thing, then when you're set up you fit your transmitter to your camera - or reset your camera transmitter to match the one in your hand.

What about the extra groups which are camera dependent? Will they work from a hand held controller?



Zenon Char
Registered: May 15, 2008
Total Posts: 755
Country: Canada

That is what what I want it for - manual. When I'm using flash in that mode I want precise control.

If I use ETTL then it will sit on top of my camera and I'll just chimp using the histogram and experience - haha. Won't use the light meter until a better option like Sekonic or someone else comes up with a Canon friendly transmitter module for the L-358. Not gonna hold my breath. If they do they will come up with a newer version meter so I will have to spend more money. Even then if I have the time I always prefer to use manual.

Of course even in ETTL there are ways around it. Have the person hold the L-358 or something like that. Not very professional unless you have an assistant.



ukphotographer
Registered: Dec 12, 2009
Total Posts: 1275
Country: United Kingdom

Forget about removing the transmitter from the camera and just carry it. Trigger the shutter, read your meter, change the transmitter group settings.



Zenon Char
Registered: May 15, 2008
Total Posts: 755
Country: Canada

Good point.



Zenon Char
Registered: May 15, 2008
Total Posts: 755
Country: Canada

So I did a little mod. Had a spare mini stand (that comes with a speedlight) and I cut it down to size. Also had a spare BP connector. Just attach to belt or belt loop. So if you need two hands for something no worries. When lights are set I just pop it on the camera.










BrianO
Registered: Aug 21, 2008
Total Posts: 8551
Country: United States

Zenon Char wrote: So I did a little mod.

Very creative. I like it.



BrianO
Registered: Aug 21, 2008
Total Posts: 8551
Country: United States

Zenon Char wrote: ...I see the ST-E3-RT has a remote release terminal. Does anyone know if you plug a 3rd party receiver into the terminal if it will fire the flashes?

I got a chance to play with the ST-E3-RT last week. It turns out the remote release terminal is to allow for firing the camera via the ST-E3-RT, using either a slave Speedlite 600EX-RT as the trigger, or using another camera with ST-E3-RT or 600EX-RT in "Link" mode for multi-camera shooting.

On pre-2012 cameras you connect that terminal to the remote release terminal of the camera via cable, but on the new bodies it's all done right through the hot shoe; pretty neat.

Now all I need is about $6K so I can buy a 5D Mark III, three 600EX-RTs and an ST-E3-RT, and I'll be set.



Zenon Char
Registered: May 15, 2008
Total Posts: 755
Country: Canada

Thanks for the feedback. Yeah all these toys are a little costly.



swldstn
Registered: Jan 08, 2012
Total Posts: 341
Country: United States

Know this is a stale but I'll see if anyone has tried this.

Set up camera with ST-E3-RX as master
Set up 600EX-RT as slaves
Connect Pocketwizard Plus III (or another one) as a Receiver and connect cable from that to the N3 Port
Use a Sekonic Lightmeter like 758DR to trigger the pocket wizard which triggers the camera which triggers the flashes.

Still need to do all the Power setup back at the camera where the ST-E3-RX is.

Or get is there a way to set up a slave flash, mounted in the hot show, to fire the camera when activated by a ST-E3-EX as a master?



cgardner
Registered: Nov 18, 2002
Total Posts: 9376
Country: United States

Zenon Char wrote:
That is what what I want it for - manual. When I'm using flash in that mode I want precise control.

If I use ETTL then it will sit on top of my camera and I'll just chimp using the histogram and experience - haha. Won't use the light meter until a better option like Sekonic or someone else comes up with a Canon friendly transmitter module for the L-358. Not gonna hold my breath. If they do they will come up with a newer version meter so I will have to spend more money. Even then if I have the time I always prefer to use manual.

Of course even in ETTL there are ways around it. Have the person hold the L-358 or something like that. Not very professional unless you have an assistant.


When I first got my L-358 I discovered it's readings didn't produce correctly exposed highlights. The reason was the camera's actual ISO when set at 100 was actually around 120. Exposure was 1/3 stop off. That was easily fixed using the compensation feature on the L-358 (press both ISO buttons, turn dial until it reads .3 stops).

The way I determined the meter needed 1/3 stop compensation to match the camera was by shooting a white towel hung on a stand and bracketing the exposure around the f/5.6 meter reading with aperture. I used the towel rather than a piece of white paper because it had texture that disappeared if overexposed.

By comparing the highlight detail in the shots on the comptuer I found the f/6.3 exposure best reproduced the white target. When I added the .3 compensaton factor the meter read 6.3 instead of 5.6 and all the subsequent meter readings where accurate.

Then it occured to me it was simpler and faster to simply fire off a few test shots at a white towel on a stand where the face of my subject would be, before then even arrrived, adjusting lights until it was just below the point of clipping in the playback.

For determining whether or not the lighting ratio fit the scene to the range of the camera I later added a black terry towel. Fill controls shadow detail, Key light overlaps fill to control highlight detail. With E-TTL A:B ratios with Master on the camera A =Fill and B= Key. I'd adjust FEC to get the highilights below clipping, then adjust the A:B ratio until I could see the detail in the black towel. That happens when the A:B ratio is 1:2, meaning incident strength of key light is 2x greater than fill:

H:S
1:1 A Group Fill
2:0 B Group Key
==
3:1 Highlight:Shadow ratio

I get the same results in M mode when I shoot from 8ft with Group A fill on bracket with the Slave in Group B at 5-1/2 feet at the same power level. Due to the inverse square law the key light at 5-1/2 feet is 2x brighter than the fill at 8ft, the same 3:1 ratio and the same result; a full range of detail from black towel (or suit coat) to white towel (or white shirt collar) with everything in between rendered as seen by eye.

The histogram is a very poor tool for precise exposure control but the clipping warning is like a million zone spot metering system for highlights with the clipping warning is enabled in the playback. Try it and you may find, as I did, that the hand held metering is redundant, because after taking the reading what do we do? Take a test shot to confirm it was correct. How do we determine that? Visually based on the clipping warning and shadow detail in the playback.