Email scam question
/forum/topic/1156964/0



rprouty
Registered: Aug 10, 2002
Total Posts: 6830
Country: United States






I received the following email from "chase@alerts.chas.com" but didn't open it. I called Chase and they advised that I forward it to their fraud department. There's something in it that won't let me forward it. I tried several different things and nothing that I can do will let me forward it to chase. The forward selection is greyed out. I saved it and then deleted the original. When I went to the deleted folder the message isn't there.
Obviously I'm not literate when it comes to computers but thought someone in FM land might have some ideas.

Thanks

Rod

Dear customer,

On October 12th, 2012, our secure server received multiple invalid login attempt on your account. We hereby advise your to follow these simple activation process to avoid account termination.

Remember to fill in the complete information to get your account unlocked.

To unlock your account click UNLOCK NOW

Thank you,

Chase



Eyeball
Registered: Jan 11, 2005
Total Posts: 3721
Country: Mexico

These kind of fraud emails are extremely common. They are sent out in bulk faking popular banks and other service providers on the internet. Just delete them.

NEVER, NEVER, NEVER click on any link or attached file contained in these emails.

If you suspect that the mail might be legitimate. Log on to your account from outside your mail system (NOT BY CLICKING ON ANY LINK IN THE MAIL NOR BY USING ANY WEBSITE ADDRESS CONTAINED IN THE MAIL). If there is some kind of alert associated with your account, you will either have difficulty logging on to your account or whatever the site is will show you some type of alert once you are logged on.

IF YOU HAVE ANY DOUBT WHATSOEVER, CALL YOUR BANK OR SERVICE PROVIDER AND CHECK THE STATUS OF YOUR ACCOUNT WITH THEM. Use a telephone number that you are sure is correct for the service provider (NOT ONE THAT MIGHT BE SHOWN IN A SUSPICIOUS EMAIL).

Normally, a legitimate email from a bank or other service provider will have some type of information included (your name, last 4 digits of your credit card, etc.) that identifies you specifically as an account holder or service subscriber. I normally am even cautious with those emails. I make a habit of only logging on to my bank or service provider by manually typing in the web address that I always use or by using a bookmark that I have created in the browser.

A legitimate email from a legitimate service provider (banks, in particular) will almost never have a link for you to click to go to your account. Any legitimate bank or service provider that does do this has horrible security policies and you should avoid using them if possible.

In your case you are probably OK as long as you didn't click on any links or attachments within the mail message. If you have any doubts, keep an eye on your account and/or talk to customer support.

Having a good anti-virus/anti-malware program installed on your computer is a very good idea. Most of the main programs of this type have email scanning and filtering to help control this risk (although they will not necessarily stop you from clicking on a fraud hyperlink inside a mail message).



Danpbphoto
Registered: Jan 03, 2004
Total Posts: 9875
Country: United States

Hi Rod!
I concur it is a scam. 95% of all financial institutions include your name when sending you and email. I get a few of these on my gm,juno and yahoo accts all the time.
As advised "delete" and call your bank.
Dan



borderlight
Registered: Dec 06, 2004
Total Posts: 1746
Country: United States

There are enough "enhanced" security features for online banking that it wouldn't be necessary for a bank to contact you by email. After 3 wrong password attempts your account is automatically closed until you CALL the bank directly and straighten it out. Banks will call you, at least mine did, if there is suspicious withdrawal activity on a debit card, probably the same for a credit card. As stated above, all personal banking information is verified by the bank if they call, never disclosed by you. Also, it is best not to have your savings connected to your checking for overdraft purposes. If possible, use three connected checking accounts with one local bank for instant transfer purposes if you are married, or two if you are single. Never use the main one, the one with all the money :-), to purchase stuff. In fact you should never activate the main debit/checking account by phone, therefore nobody has the numbers. Direct deposit checking is usually free, but probably not from the banks we bailed out.



Wobble
Registered: Nov 30, 2011
Total Posts: 721
Country: United States

On a PC using Outlook you can right click on the email and choose Message Options. This will display the Internet Headers. Copy and paste that info into an email to your Bank's fraud department along with a screen shot of the original message(hit your Prnt Scr key and paste it into a Word doc or the body of your email). Hope this helps.