continuous daylight bulbs junk?
/forum/topic/1156500/0



blutch
Registered: Jul 29, 2012
Total Posts: 756
Country: United States

I'm interested in putting together a super cheap indoor lighting setup to try my hand at doing headshots. There is a person in my area selling a very inexpensive backdrop and 2 light setup with stands and umbrellas. The lights and stand heads take those curly lightbulbs. I've never seen this before, but I wonder if they are something that can be usable. Please keep in mind, this isn't a pro thing at all for me and this will give me a chance to begin to learn some studio techniques.



davenfl
Registered: Jun 29, 2008
Total Posts: 4063
Country: United States

You haven't included any photos of the setup but in general the bulbs should work fine. We have high end stuff for the studio but constructed special rigs for a recent assignment using multiple DIY fixtures and curly bulbs. As long as you check your white balance there should be not problem.

Here is an article from Joe Edlelman on the subject matter if your interested.

http://www.joeedelman.com/blog/photography/lighting/no-flicker-fluorescent-studio-lights-cheap/

Dave



blutch
Registered: Jul 29, 2012
Total Posts: 756
Country: United States

Thanks Dave! I have watched those Joe Edelman videos many times and am considering going with the florescent light panels he makes. Believe it or not, the thing holding me back on that is I have no stands or stand heads. This super cheap setup that I found on CL might work out ok and I don't have as much invested. Here's the link. http://oklahomacity.craigslist.org/for/3326549722.html
let me know what you think and thanks! B



davenfl
Registered: Jun 29, 2008
Total Posts: 4063
Country: United States

You haven't included any photos of the setup but in general the bulbs should work fine. We have high end stuff for the studio but constructed special rigs for a recent assignment using multiple DIY fixtures and curly bulbs. As long as you check your white balance there should be not problem.

Here is an article from Joe Edlelman on the subject matter if your interested plus another article on a DIY lighting project.

http://www.joeedelman.com/blog/photography/lighting/no-flicker-fluorescent-studio-lights-cheap/

http://www.diyphotography.net/how-to-build-a-sweet-and-simple-cfl-strip-light

Dave



visualist
Registered: Jan 09, 2010
Total Posts: 83
Country: Switzerland

continuous daylight bulbs junk?

Yes they are. Unless you plan on using a exzessive amount of Photoshop.



blutch
Registered: Jul 29, 2012
Total Posts: 756
Country: United States

visualist, could you elaborate a bit when you have a chance? Thanks. B



cwebster
Registered: Oct 03, 2005
Total Posts: 3358
Country: United States

There was a recent thread here on continuous lighting using CFLs and the conclusion was that by the time you get enough bulbs for enough light to work at decent aperture and ISO settings you will have spent almost enough to buy a set of entry-level strobes like ABs or Brownline, etc.

The CFLs become very expensive when you start looking for high-wattage (85-105W) with CRI (color rendering index) greater than 90 or so (92-95 is best). And by the time you populate a fixture with 4 or 5 of those $50-60 lamps, you could buy something more effective.

<Chas>



BrianO
Registered: Aug 21, 2008
Total Posts: 8454
Country: United States

blutch wrote: I'm interested in putting together a super cheap indoor lighting setup to try my hand at doing headshots. There is a person in my area selling a very inexpensive backdrop and 2 light setup with stands and umbrellas. The lights and stand heads take those curly lightbulbs.

The problem with the lights you linked to are many. First, each one only has a single bulb so there's not a lot of light to work with.

Second, what light there is can't be controlled in intensity other than by changing the light-to-subject distance, which changes not just the exposure but also the quality of the light.

Third, the fixtures the bulbs are mounted on aren't right for that kind of bulb; with no reflectors, very little of the light is being directed into the umbrellas; most of it is being spilled out in all directions.

I know you want to go cheap, but this would be a waste of money in my opinion.

Continuous fluorescent lights do have a place in the studio, but cost isn't the main reason for getting them. If you want to go with CFLs, the minimum setup I would suggest -- other than building something yourself -- would be this one:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/569816-REG/Interfit_INT216_Super_Cool_lite_9_Fluorescent.html

While you're saving to get good lights, you can do like renowned headshot photographer Peter Hurley did when he first started: stand with your back to a large north-facing window, and use natural light exclusively.



jefferies1
Registered: Jul 03, 2008
Total Posts: 2538
Country: United States

How many bulbs and what size. If 1 or 2 at 85 watt each you are really low on the bightness. You will be shooting at 800+ISO and 1/60, F4 at best. If they have 4-5 bulbs per light unit then 2 units might be OK for basic single person headshots. Not full body and not at F11 ( if you even want that DOF)
Forget lighting the background. All you will light is the face.
The light is beautiful from CFL and a soft box but you need to understand the limits.



blutch
Registered: Jul 29, 2012
Total Posts: 756
Country: United States

One bulb per unit - 45 watt bulbs. No thanks. I passed. I appreciate the heads up here!

B



visualist
Registered: Jan 09, 2010
Total Posts: 83
Country: Switzerland

blutch wrote:
visualist, could you elaborate a bit when you have a chance? Thanks. B


I was reffering to the color temp. Using more lightbulbs and a slower time will help, but not eliminate this problem. you'll always have to deal with a green tint.

And ofcourse output is an issue. By the time you have enough light these "cheap" diy solutions are just as expensive as an entry-level flash. a while ago someone showed off his verry well made diy-Kinoflo, but the material alone was around 300$ or so.



Cr VI
Registered: Apr 01, 2006
Total Posts: 121
Country: United States

Search "ephoto" lighting kits on Amazon. You will be surprised at what you can find. You will even find your proposed set for less.



blutch
Registered: Jul 29, 2012
Total Posts: 756
Country: United States

I ended up building the continuous lighting fluorescent panels recommended by Joel Edelmann in his videos. I'm fairly happy with it, but need more lights and some kind of strobes for the background.. it is really tough to do good lighting cheap. Thanks

B



cwebster
Registered: Oct 03, 2005
Total Posts: 3358
Country: United States

"...and some kind of strobes for the background.."

You will waste a lot of light color correcting those strobes to match your fluorescent lights. You're almost better off buying more fluorescent lights for the b/g, but you can't get away from the color issue.

<Chas>



visualist
Registered: Jan 09, 2010
Total Posts: 83
Country: Switzerland

blutch wrote:
I ended up building the continuous lighting fluorescent panels recommended by Joel Edelmann in his videos. I'm fairly happy with it, but need more lights and some kind of strobes for the background.. it is really tough to do good lighting cheap. Thanks

B


Of course you need more light. How much did you spend so far?
And no, good lighting on the cheap is ... cheap , but not with diy continous light. A second hand compact, a lightstand, para-umbrella and a cheap 5in1 reflector can be bought at any given time around 300$. That's about as cheap as it gets, unless you're verry lucky, and will keep you bussy for quite some time.