Standing Rings, Jewellery
/forum/topic/1151573/0



dunker
Registered: May 22, 2007
Total Posts: 4
Country: United Kingdom

Hello!

I need to photograph a few rings and need to keep the whole shank in view. I envisage the shot being taken from slightly above the ring with the ring at an angle so you can see the shape and curve of the shank.

My question is what is the best way to hold/stand the rings so I can a) get the kind of shot I'm looking for and b) ensure that each ring is in a similar position / angle to keep some uniformity to the range of images?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks



John Skinner
Registered: May 31, 2007
Total Posts: 603
Country: Canada

I used to use 1 of 2 methods.

The type of glue/adhesive they use on the back of new credit cards when you get them. It's like a ball of snot, that won't stick to anything. I would get this and make a very small ball, keep it in a plastic case for ear plugs in my bag.

If you can't find that (because it's hard to find and clear in color) just ordinary play-doh in a very very tiny ball. It leaves no marks, can be wiped off easily, and holds up well.

Hope that helps.



JBPhotog
Registered: Oct 10, 2007
Total Posts: 521
Country: Canada

There is also Blue Tack which is a very sticky mouldable substance like playdoh. It can be formed to hold the bottom of the shank. Try a craft store for supply.

Failing that, every still photog should own a hot glue gun, check your local hobby craft or hardware store. Bostik make a low temp stick which should be good for this, choose the translucent stick (B0720) good for plastic so it doesn't bond well with the shank.



AlphaValues
Registered: Dec 15, 2011
Total Posts: 50
Country: United States

This product has properties very similar to the "ball of snot" John Skinner mentioned.

http://www.amazon.com/Scotch-Restickable-Inches-Squares-R100/dp/B0039N3QO2/ref=sr_1_2?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1348506543&sr=1-2&keywords=transparent+double+sided+sticky+squares



BrianO
Registered: Aug 21, 2008
Total Posts: 8454
Country: United States

Another option is to suspend the ring in mid air with a piece of fine black thread. You can then remove the thread in Photoshop.



cwebster
Registered: Oct 03, 2005
Total Posts: 3358
Country: United States

BrianO wrote:
Another option is to suspend the ring in mid air with a piece of fine black thread. You can then remove the thread in Photoshop.


That allows the background to be behind/below the ring, not up against it.



Garry Burton
Registered: Dec 30, 2007
Total Posts: 622
Country: Australia

Jeweller's wax works brilliantly.

You use a very small blob and holds the ring firmly without leaving much of a residue.



BrianO
Registered: Aug 21, 2008
Total Posts: 8454
Country: United States

BrianO wrote: Another option is to suspend the ring in mid air with a piece of fine black thread. You can then remove the thread in Photoshop.

cwebster wrote: That allows the background to be behind/below the ring, not up against it.

Yep; it's a very flexible method...once you get used to working "upside down."

The last time I did it back in school we were using view cameras, so the upside down image on the ground glass actually looked right side up.



fsphoto
Registered: Mar 14, 2005
Total Posts: 34
Country: N/A

Check out a company called The Set Shop
http://setshop.com/expendables/wax



phuang3
Registered: Feb 09, 2005
Total Posts: 1199
Country: Taiwan

The faber-castell tack-it is perfect for this purpose. It can be reused for long time.








nolaguy
Registered: Mar 09, 2011
Total Posts: 555
Country: United States

Garry Burton wrote:
Jeweller's wax works brilliantly.

You use a very small blob and holds the ring firmly without leaving much of a residue.



Garry may be referring to bees wax - which I've used for many years - but other suggestions herein have peaked my interest. Gonna try them.



sherijohnson
Registered: Jan 23, 2009
Total Posts: 3461
Country: United States

JBPhotog wrote:
There is also Blue Tack which is a very sticky mouldable substance like playdoh. It can be formed to hold the bottom of the shank. Try a craft store for supply.

Failing that, every still photog should own a hot glue gun, check your local hobby craft or hardware store. Bostik make a low temp stick which should be good for this, choose the translucent stick (B0720) good for plastic so it doesn't bond well with the shank.


I just recently found the tack in a more neutral color, it has been added to my camera case and hope to use it this weekend to give this a try. What I bought is Scotch removable mounting putty, it is sort of gray or beige in color.



DiPace
Registered: Mar 06, 2008
Total Posts: 328
Country: United States

Depending on the width of the shank and the type of ring, standing the ring may not be the answer. When using wax, you don't want so much wax that it obscures part of the shank, or so little that the ring will tilt as you shoot it. I tend to focus-stack images of rings in order to get enough DOF and detail for larger print, so I stopped using wax because it softened too much from the molding and the lighting (with larger rings, anyway). Movement is also a huge problem if you need to take a series of shots using varied lighting (for the metal, for the stones, pave, etc.). I also run into movement issues when suspending jewelry like earrings. If you only need one shot, either method can be OK.

These days, though, I shoot rings on a pane of glass. I shoot from above the ring, at an angle that, when the image is inverted, will appear as if the rings is standing, and leaning slightly into the lens. For consistency, I reference the previous shot for placement and angle, since the ring's setting may be different, and produce a different angle.

Other considerations will be which position works best for setting up the lighting. Setting up diffusion panels to feather the lighting just right can lead you in one direction or another.

I haven't upped my game enough that I'd say my method is a sure thing, but I'm putting it out there as an option.