Equestrian Show - Garden State Horse Show
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longbob
Registered: Dec 25, 2011
Total Posts: 86
Country: United States

Still trying to get the hang of Equestrian photography. Today I went with my girlfriend to the Garden State Preview Show in Sussex County, NJ and brought along my 7D. She brought her horse to show and did great placing 3rd.

When we arrived the sky was filled with plenty of sun but as the day went on the clouds rolled in and were going in and out the rest of the day which made things a bit more difficult.

Here are a few, let me know what you think!

Enjoy,
Bob



longbob
Registered: Dec 25, 2011
Total Posts: 86
Country: United States

Few more



Russ Isabella
Registered: Jan 30, 2005
Total Posts: 9959
Country: United States

Bob: It's almost impossible for me to look past the horrible backgrounds in these images. I don't know if there is anything you could have done about your positioning (move left, move right, get high, dig a hole and shoot from below ground level) to reduce the trailers/sheds/porta potties/trucks, but that's what it would take to improve upon these photos. At the very least, I'd go vertical with #2, going as tight as you can while still leaving breathing room on the left of the image.



longbob
Registered: Dec 25, 2011
Total Posts: 86
Country: United States

Russ Isabella wrote:
Bob: It's almost impossible for me to look past the horrible backgrounds in these images. I don't know if there is anything you could have done about your positioning (move left, move right, get high, dig a hole and shoot from below ground level) to reduce the trailers/sheds/porta potties/trucks, but that's what it would take to improve upon these photos. At the very least, I'd go vertical with #2, going as tight as you can while still leaving breathing room on the left of the image.


Thanks for the feedback! I agree the backgrounds are really unattractive! This was a Preview show for the main show that starts Monday. Most of the vehicles will be moved by then and fake trees set up around the outside of the course. They also had one 1 set of stands set up so far (normally the make it like an arena). So when I go back next Saturday I will be shooting from a much different environment.

I still need to take what you said into play when finding a place to shoot and take into account the background.

Thanks again.

Bob



sandman22
Registered: Dec 26, 2011
Total Posts: 552
Country: United States

couldn't agree more on the background, sounds like the real thing should be a little easier on you! We going to see some playoff bball here shortly russ??



markedman
Registered: May 02, 2005
Total Posts: 165
Country: United States

Backround is very important. You might be able improve it a little if you shorten focal length or in post. Riders have little interest in "ground" shots. Unless they are going all out with feet off the ground.
Best position is to be on the "inside" of a jump so the rider is looking in your direction towards the next one.
Also double rails are best because you get more "hang" time.
When shooting candids. ALWAYS get the ears up. That is the shot they buy.
Overall a good effort.



P Alesse
Registered: Dec 25, 2004
Total Posts: 11401
Country: United States

Yup.



longbob
Registered: Dec 25, 2011
Total Posts: 86
Country: United States

markedman wrote:
Backround is very important. You might be able improve it a little if you shorten focal length or in post. Riders have little interest in "ground" shots. Unless they are going all out with feet off the ground.
Best position is to be on the "inside" of a jump so the rider is looking in your direction towards the next one.
Also double rails are best because you get more "hang" time.
When shooting candids. ALWAYS get the ears up. That is the shot they buy.
Overall a good effort.


Thanks for the tips! I am heading the to show bright and early tomorrow morning and will be there all weekend. I will be sure to post up some more shots after I return, hopefully with improved captures!



Dennis M 1064
Registered: Jun 29, 2012
Total Posts: 420
Country: United States

Horse events and dog events. There seems to be an endless supply of 'stuff' in the background. Shallow depth of field is likely the best control you will get.

Good pointers from marked man.



BobMarkey
Registered: Jan 28, 2010
Total Posts: 67
Country: United States

Seeing this site's backgrounds, I remember how fortunate I am to shoot down here in Wellington, Fla., home of Palm Beach International Equestrian Center.

I would shoot more wide open to eliminate more background. On Nos. 2, 5, and 6, I would go for more of a 45-degree angle.

Also, practice to get your jump timing correct. Most riders prefer horizontal images unless they're in a grand prix or jumpers class and shot head on or near head on.



Dennis M 1064
Registered: Jun 29, 2012
Total Posts: 420
Country: United States

BobMarkey wrote:


Also, practice to get your jump timing correct. Most riders prefer horizontal images unless they're in a grand prix or jumpers class and shot head on or near head on.



I'm not sure I understand what you mean here. The horse being horizontal? More like #3 and #6? The camera in landscape position, as opposed to portrait? When I look at his photos, and read this statement, I'm just not getting it. I'm going to have to see if I can find some Hunter Jumper Rags and take a look at what they are shooting these days. I'm more on the cowboy side, and the wife is Dressage. Go figure.


Thanks Bob,

Dennis



markedman
Registered: May 02, 2005
Total Posts: 165
Country: United States

I sell horizontal and vertical shots. All in the eye of the buyer.
Generally you will have many chances to get the shot. So I try and mix it up with different perspective. That way you may get more sales due to the different look.
Also try and interact with the rider or trainer after they get ribbons.The "ribbon shot" is a big seller and allows more control. Try and get friends and family in a few shots. This will add to sales big time.
Western riders generally do not buy many photos. Not worth the time in my opinion.
However there is opportunity in Dressage if you can master the movement shots. A LOT HARDER !! But it will give you an advantage over the other horsey photographers.



BobMarkey
Registered: Jan 28, 2010
Total Posts: 67
Country: United States

Yes, landscape orientation. I know vertical shots sell as well, but many riders prefer the standard, 45-degree angle shot in horizontal format. I prefer vertical images, myself.



markedman
Registered: May 02, 2005
Total Posts: 165
Country: United States

You can't go wrong with the standard shot. But I prefer whatever they buy.
But this has been my experience in 11+ years of shooting equestrian events .
As always "your mileage may vary".