Home · Register · Software · Software · Join Upload & Sell

  

  Previous versions of mawyatt's message #14193280 « Macro Rails vs Lens focus stacking »

  

mawyatt
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Re: Macro Rails vs Lens focus stacking


Pavel wrote:
Thanks for that info. I am interested small objects like small antique bottles and such (for a neighbor who may start selling them) and studio type flower arrangements so they would not be macro initially but the question seems to fit best here, as I imagine that macro is where focus stacking experts are most likely to be found.

I had not heard of WeMacro - so that's a good lead. Thanks.


Hi Pavel,

There's lots of information on the Stackshot, Wemacro and MJKZZ focus rails over at photomacrograpgy site. The Stackshot is the Cadillac of the focus rail systems, the Wemacro & MJKZZ are lower cost versions, but lack the versatility of the Stackshot controller. Zerene is the stacking software by Rik Littlefield (moderator there) used by many folks, myself included. Zerene interfaces with the Stackshot controller and provides just about any focus stacking feature you could want and works with other rail systems by way of programmable rail parameters such as thread pitch, stepper motor step size, motor torque, rail speed & acceleration and so on. Very flexible system indeed!!

I have all three focus stacking systems (been doing this for chip imaging (ICs) since before 2012), and recently modified some surplus THK KR20 linear industrial rails to work with the Stackshot & Wemacro controllers. The result is about as good a focus stacking rail system as possible without spending a fortune!

However this is all for studio work, the field is different altogether.

Can Tuncer has produced some excellent work shown on DPR using the Wemacro system focus stacking peacock features. This speaks highly of Can's skill and the Wemacro focus rail system.

https://www.dpreview.com/news/6016272115/incredible-microscopic-close-ups-of-a-peacock-feather

More of Can's work here.

http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1509372

Best,

Mike



Sep 24, 2017 at 06:23 PM
mawyatt
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Re: Macro Rails vs Lens focus stacking


Pavel wrote:
Thanks for that info. I am interested small objects like small antique bottles and such (for a neighbor who may start selling them) and studio type flower arrangements so they would not be macro initially but the question seems to fit best here, as I imagine that macro is where focus stacking experts are most likely to be found.

I had not heard of WeMacro - so that's a good lead. Thanks.


Hi Pavel,

There's lots of information on the Stackshot, Wemacro and MJKZZ focus rails over at photomacrograpgy site. The Stackshot is the Cadillac of the focus rail systems, the Wemacro & MJKZZ are lower cost versions, but lack the versatility of the Stackshot controller. Zerene is the stacking software by Rik Littlefield (moderator there) used by many folks, myself included. Zerene interfaces with the Stackshot controller and provides just about any focus stacking feature you could want and works with other rail systems by way of programmable rail parameters such as thread pitch, stepper motor step size, motor torque, rail speed & acceleration and so on. Very flexible system indeed!!

I have all three focus stacking systems (been doing this for chip imaging (ICs) since before 2012), and recently modified some surplus THK KR20 linear industrial rails to work with the Stackshot & Wemacro controllers. The result is about as good a focus stacking rail system as possible without spending a fortune!

However this is all for studio work, the field is different altogether.

Can Tuncer has produced some excellent work shown on DPR using the Wemacro system focus stacking peacock features. This speaks highly of Can's skill and the Wemacro focus rail system.

https://www.dpreview.com/news/6016272115/incredible-microscopic-close-ups-of-a-peacock-feather


Best,

Mike



Sep 24, 2017 at 04:47 PM





  Previous versions of mawyatt's message #14193280 « Macro Rails vs Lens focus stacking »