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  Previous versions of Makten's message #11910718 « A7/A7r - performance with WA RF lenses »

  

Makten
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Re: A7/A7r - performance with WA RF lenses


While not being a "wide angle", I can now happily inform you that the tiny Leica 40/2 Summicron-C performs unexpectedly good on the a7R. I met Martin Agfors (I'm sure he's here, but don't know his alias) for lunch and a little walk, and he kindly lent me the a7R, while he got to play with my ZF 35/1.4 and CV 40/2.

Wide open:


Martin Agfors by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


I also tried my Nokton 35/1.2, but either there is something wrong with it, or it must be stopped down to get sharp outside the central part of the image. So, I won't show you anything from it, but I can at least say that it does give the same color shift as the Summicron-C, which is... close to none!

The C at infinity, wide open (go to Flickr for full resolution):


Summicron-C @ f/2 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


And at f/5.6 (or perhaps f/8, I don't remember):


Summicron-C @ f/5.6 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


As you can see, despite the extremely compact design, resolution is OK even wide open, except for the extreme corners. There is a midzone hump with somewhat lower resolution, but in my opinion, absolutely nothing to worry about. The spherical aberration wide open was expected from this sort of classic lens, and I don't mind it at all.
Worth to mention is that the camera was set to some sort of auto-correction of shading, but it would be very surprising if it did something to files shot with "no lens" on the camera. Also note that CA is very, very low.

How about curvature of field? Here is a full sized semi-closeup at f/5.6:


Summicron-C @ f/5.6 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr

I must say I'm impressed. This little, unexpensive thing will do fine as a walkaround lens. Now, the FE 35/2.8 is clearly better, but it is somewhat clinical in its rendering.
Interestingly enough, the FE, Nokton and Summicron-C all have ~the same exit pupil distance from the sensor, if my eyes weren't lying.

The most important question is still unanswered: Would these lenses do better on the a7? I have no clue.

------------

Edit: And oh! If you get to try this camera with your MF lenses, be sure to turn peaking OFF. It's NOT accurate and I had a lot of images out of focus because I used peaking (even in magnified view), before I realised that was the problem. As Agfors stated; highest contrast isn't necessarily where best sharpness is.



Nov 04, 2013 at 08:57 PM
Makten
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Re: A7/A7r - performance with WA RF lenses


While not being a "wide angle", I can now happily inform you that the tiny Leica 40/2 Summicron-C performs unexpectedly good on the a7R. I met Martin Agfors (I'm sure he's here, but don't know his alias) for lunch and a little walk, and he kindly lent me the a7R, while he got to play with my ZF 35/ 1.4nd CV 40/2.

Wide open:


Martin Agfors by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


I also tried my Nokton 35/1.2, but either there is something wrong with it, or it must be stopped down to get sharp outside the central part of the image. So, I won't show you anything from it, but I can at least say that it does give the same color shift as the Summicron-C, which is... close to none!

The C at infinity, wide open (go to Flickr for full resolution):


Summicron-C @ f/2 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


And at f/5.6 (or perhaps f/8, I don't remember):


Summicron-C @ f/5.6 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


As you can see, despite the extremely compact design, resolution is OK even wide open, except for the extreme corners. There is a midzone hump with somewhat lower resolution, but in my opinion, absolutely nothing to worry about. The spherical aberration wide open was expected from this sort of classic lens, and I don't mind it at all.
Worth to mention is that the camera was set to some sort of auto-correction of shading, but it would be very surprising if it did something to files shot with "no lens" on the camera. Also note that CA is very, very low.

How about curvature of field? Here is a full sized semi-closeup at f/5.6:


Summicron-C @ f/5.6 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr

I must say I'm impressed. This little, unexpensive thing will do fine as a walkaround lens. Now, the FE 35/2.8 is clearly better, but it is somewhat clinical in its rendering.
Interestingly enough, the FE, Nokton and Summicron-C all have ~the same exit pupil distance from the sensor, if my eyes weren't lying.

The most important question is still unanswered: Would these lenses do better on the a7? I have no clue.

------------

Edit: And oh! If you get to try this camera with your MF lenses, be sure to turn peaking OFF. It's NOT accurate and I had a lot of images out of focus because I used peaking (even in magnified view), before I realised that was the problem. As Agfors stated; highest contrast isn't necessarily where best sharpness is.



Nov 04, 2013 at 08:18 PM
Makten
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Re: A7/A7r - performance with WA RF lenses


While not being a "wide angle", I can now happily inform you that the tiny Leica 40/2 Summicron-C performs unexpectedly good on the a7R. I met Martin Agfors (I'm sure he's here, but don't know his alias) for lunch and a little walk, and he kindly lent me the a7R, while he got to play with my ZF 35/ 1.4nd CV 40/2.

Wide open:


Martin Agfors by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


I also tried my Nokton 35/1.2, but either there is something wrong with it, or it must be stopped down to get sharp outside the central part of the image. So, I won't show you anything from it, but I can at least say that it does give the same color shift as the Summicron-C, which is... close to none!

The C at infinity, wide open (go to Flickr for full resolution):


Summicron-C @ f/2 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


And at f/5.6 (or perhaps f/8, I don't remember):


Summicron-C @ f/5.6 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


As you can see, despite the extremely compact design, resolution is OK even wide open, except for the extreme corners. There is a midzone hump with somewhat lower resolution, but in my opinion, absolutely nothing to worry about. The spherical aberration wide open was expected from this sort of classic lens, and I don't mind it at all.
Worth to mention is that the camera was set to some sort of auto-correction of shading, but it would be very surprising if it did something to files shot with "no lens" on the camera. Also note that CA is very, very low.

How about curvature of field? Here is a full sized semi-closeup at f/5.6:


Summicron-C @ f/5.6 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr

I must say I'm impressed. This little, unexpensive thing will do fine as a walkaround lens. Now, the FE 35/2.8 is clearly better, but it is somewhat clinical in its rendering.
Interestingly enough, the FE, Nokton and Summicron-C all have ~the same exit pupil distance from the sensor, if my eyes weren't lying.

The most important question is still unanswered: Would these lenses do better on the a7? I have no clue.

------------

Edit: And oh! If you get to try this camera with your MF lenses, be sure to turn peaking OFF. It's NOT accurate and I had a lot of images out of focus because I used peaking, before I realised that was the problem. As Agfors stated; highest contrast isn't necessarily where best sharpness is.



Nov 04, 2013 at 08:15 PM
Makten
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Re: A7/A7r - performance with WA RF lenses


While not being a "wide angle", I can now happily inform you that the tiny Leica 40/2 Summicron-C performs unexpectedly good on the a7R. I met Martin Agfors (I'm sure he's here, but don't know his alias) for lunch and a little walk, and he kindly lent me the a7R, while he got to play with my ZF 35/2 and CV 40/2.

Wide open:


Martin Agfors by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


I also tried my Nokton 35/1.2, but either there is something wrong with it, or it must be stopped down to get sharp outside the central part of the image. So, I won't show you anything from it, but I can at least say that it does give the same color shift as the Summicron-C, which is... close to none!

The C at infinity, wide open (go to Flickr for full resolution):


Summicron-C @ f/2 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


And at f/5.6 (or perhaps f/8, I don't remember):


Summicron-C @ f/5.6 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr


As you can see, despite the extremely compact design, resolution is OK even wide open, except for the extreme corners. There is a midzone hump with somewhat lower resolution, but in my opinion, absolutely nothing to worry about. The spherical aberration wide open was expected from this sort of classic lens, and I don't mind it at all.
Worth to mention is that the camera was set to some sort of auto-correction of shading, but it would be very surprising if it did something to files shot with "no lens" on the camera. Also note that CA is very, very low.

How about curvature of field? Here is a full sized semi-closeup at f/5.6:


Summicron-C @ f/5.6 by Martin Hertsius, on Flickr

I must say I'm impressed. This little, unexpensive thing will do fine as a walkaround lens. Now, the FE 35/2.8 is clearly better, but it is somewhat clinical in its rendering.
Interestingly enough, the FE, Nokton and Summicron-C all have ~the same exit pupil distance from the sensor, if my eyes weren't lying.

The most important question is still unanswered: Would these lenses do better on the a7? I have no clue.

------------

Edit: And oh! If you get to try this camera with your MF lenses, be sure to turn peaking OFF. It's NOT accurate and I had a lot of images out of focus because I used peaking, before I realised that was the problem. As Agfors stated; highest contrast isn't necessarily where best sharpness is.



Nov 04, 2013 at 08:05 PM



  Previous versions of Makten's message #11910718 « A7/A7r - performance with WA RF lenses »