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  Previous versions of Access's message #10994044 « How does 5D3 track subjects? (Object recognition) »

  

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Re: How does 5D3 track subjects? (Object recognition)


Okay now that I actually have the camera in front of me, along with the manual:

page 71: "AI servo AF for Moving Subjects
AF mode is suited for moving subjects when the focusing distance keeps changing. While you hold down the shutter button, the subject will be focused continuously.
The exposure is set the moment the picture is taken.
When the AF area selection mode is sest to 61-point automatic select (p. 72).
the camera first uses the manually-selected AF point to focus. During autofocusing, if the subject moves away from the manually-selected AF point, focus tracking continues as long as the subject is covered by the Area AF frame."

The rest of the chapter is a decent read, but good information. Page 85 talks about how to set the parameters for your preferred sport, from Tennis to Rhythmic Gymnastics.

page 88: "Case 5: For erratic subjects moving quickly in any direction.
Even as the subject moves dramatically up, down, left, or right, the AF point will switch automatically to focus-track the subject.

There's a lot of other good info in there, I can't quote it all. RTFM.

Also if it's constantly extrapolating like that, try to avoid shooting unnecessarily, and unless it is your specific intention, try to avoid shooting with or after sudden direction changes.

The only other advice I can give is to study your sport inside and out, watch a few games or performances without photographing so you get a general feeling for what is going to happen next. This comes with all things, but try to put yourself in the head of the athlete, know what he's going to do next so you can follow it and capture that defining moment like it's second nature. If you are dedicated enough, learn to play your sport (if possible, even if only on the novice or rec level) to learn the basics, spend time with other players, just get to know them and the culture, traditions, physical nature, physics and intricacies of the sport. Many sports have concepts like signaling (some type of body language specific to that sport, typically used to communicate with friendly teammates) and reading (being able to interpret what an adversary's next move will be in order to outsmart or outplay him) and understanding these different concepts as well as keeping your ears open can help you get into the mindset of the athletes and ultimately shoot the sport better.



Sep 26, 2012 at 03:58 AM
Access
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Re: How does 5D3 track subjects? (Object recognition)


Okay now that I actually have the camera in front of me, along with the manual:

page 71: "AI servo AF for Moving Subjects
AF mode is suited for moving subjects when the focusing distance keeps changing. While you hold down the shutter button, the subject will be focused continuously.
The exposure is set the moment the picture is taken.
When the AF area selection mode is sest to 61-point automatic select (p. 72).
the camera first uses the manually-selected AF point to focus. During autofocusing, if the subject moves away from the manually-selected AF point, focus tracking continues as long as the subject is covered by the Area AF frame."

The rest of the chapter is a decent read, but good information. Page 85 talks about how to set the parameters for your preferred sport, from Tennis to Rhythmic Gymnastics.

page 88: "Case 5: For erratic subjects moving quickly in any direction.
Even as the subject moves dramatically up, down, left, or right, the AF point will switch automatically to focus-track the subject.

There's a lot of other good info in there, I can't quote it all. RTFM.

Also if it's constantly extrapolating like that, try to avoid shooting unnecessarily, and unless it is your specific intention, try to avoid shooting with or after sudden direction changes.

The only other advice I can give is to study your sport inside and out, watch a few games or performances without photographing so you get a general feeling for what is going to happen next. This comes with all things, but try to put yourself in the head of the athlete, know what he's going to do next so you can follow it and capture that defining moment like it's second nature. If you are dedicated enough, learn to play your sport (if possible, even only on the novice or rec level) to learn the basics, spend time with other players, just get to know them and the culture, traditions, physical nature, physics and intricacies of the sport. Many sports have concepts like signaling (some type of body language specific to that sport, typically used to communicate with friendly teammates) and reading (being able to interpret what an adversary's next move will be in order to outsmart or outplay him) and understanding these different concepts as well as keeping your ears open can help you get into the mindset of the athletes and ultimately shoot the sport better.



Sep 26, 2012 at 03:57 AM
Access
Offline
Upload & Sell: Off
Re: How does 5D3 track subjects? (Object recognition)


Okay now that I actually have the camera in front of me, along with the manual:

page 71: "AI servo AF for Moving Subjects
AF mode is suited for moving subjects when the focusing distance keeps changing. While you hold down the shutter button, the subject will be focused continuously.
The exposure is set the moment the picture is taken.
When the AF area selection mode is sest to 61-point automatic select (p. 72).
the camera first uses the manually-selected AF point to focus. During autofocusing, if the subject moves away from the manually-selected AF point, focus tracking continues as long as the subject is covered by the Area AF frame."

The rest of the chapter is a decent read, but good information. Page 85 talks about how to set the parameters for your preferred sport, from Tennis to Rhythmic Gymnastics.

page 88: "Case 5: For erratic subjects moving quickly in any direction.
Even as the subject moves dramatically up, down, left, or right, the AF point will switch automatically to focus-track the subject.

There's a lot of other good info in there, I can't quote it all. RTFM.

Also if it's constantly extrapolating like that, try to avoid shooting unnecessarily, and unless it is your specific intention, try to avoid shooting with or after sudden direction changes.

The only other advice I can give is to study your sport inside and out, watch a few games or performances without photographing so you get a general feeling for what is going to happen next. This comes with all things, but try to put yourself in the head of the athlete, know what he's going to do next so you can follow it and capture that defining moment like it's second nature.



Sep 26, 2012 at 03:36 AM



  Previous versions of Access's message #10994044 « How does 5D3 track subjects? (Object recognition) »