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Archive 2009 · Anyone develop plate glass negatives?
  
 
matt sager
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p.1 #1 · Anyone develop plate glass negatives?


A customer gave me a bunch of plate glass negatives this week and I would love to make some prints from several of them. Does anyone have any experience with this that you would like to share? Is it possible to use an enlarger, or are they exposed directly on the paper? What is the best light source to use to expose them? Can I scan them? Any info or suggestions would be great!

Matt



Mar 12, 2009 at 11:53 PM
omarlyn
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p.1 #2 · Anyone develop plate glass negatives?


TAG (interested in this as well!)


Mar 13, 2009 at 06:00 PM
LABRIEDL
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p.1 #3 · Anyone develop plate glass negatives?


If you have an enlarger lay the glass negative on top of your photo paper and expose. You'll have to make some test prints to determine the time. Set the timer for 1 min and move a sheet of paper exposing more negative every 10 sec. Then develop. Based on the developed print you'll know what time to expose the enitre negative for. Make sure that the light from the enlarger passes over the entire piece of glass. I'm assuming you're printing black and white. (This will be a contact image) If you want to make the picture larger, you'll have to find a way to mount the glass negative inside the enlarger. If you don't have an enlarger you'll have to work in the dark and then use a light source of some sort. The principle is the same.

Cheers,

David

Have fun



Mar 15, 2009 at 03:33 PM
Richard GT
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p.1 #4 · Anyone develop plate glass negatives?


I've done it. Of course you will want and enlarger and a dark room. Just place the glass negative on the photo paper and expose. Develop to taste. Can be done with a lightbulb as well though when no enlarger is at hand.

Best wishes,
Richard



Mar 16, 2009 at 04:24 PM
 

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aborr
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p.1 #5 · Anyone develop plate glass negatives?


I guess it depends on the size of the negatives. "Quarter plate" is (was?) a common size. They're 3 1/4 by 4 1/4 inches, which makes for pretty small contact prints.

If you have access to a 4x5 enlarger, you can make a mask out of a piece of cardboard and put in on top of the lower half of a 4x5 negative carrier, and make enlargements to any size you want.

On the other hand, if you're like me, and can't remember the last time you worked in a darkroom, you might consider doing it digitally. Scan the negatives with a flatbed scanner. If the scanner software you've got doesn't give you the option of inverting the output from negative to positive, use Photoshop and select select 'invert' to get a postive image from the scan. (I don't have PS in front of me, but I think that option is under the 'image adjustments' sub-menu.)

Al





Mar 20, 2009 at 09:50 AM
Spyglass
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p.1 #6 · Anyone develop plate glass negatives?


All responders have given good instructions. Let me add that the emulsion, or dull side, of glass plates is often very fragile. They may also toxic from residual bromides, iodines, and mecury. Handle them only by the edges preferably with either lintless cotton gloves or the latex variety as found in a doctors office (I prefer the later).

Think twice about using an enlarger for other than a light source for contact printing. Conventional condensor enlarges with tungsten or quartz lamps will probably crack the glass because of the heat generated. If you must englarge, consider a cold head enlarger, essentially flourescent.

What is the vintage of these glass plates. What is the subject matter? Are they civil war, victorian, or old french nudies. I'm not snooping but suggesting that the answers also may determine how to best accomplish your purpose.



Mar 22, 2009 at 06:52 AM
matt sager
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p.1 #7 · Anyone develop plate glass negatives?


Thanks a lot for the suggestions! I did not consider the fact that the heat produced by the lamp could potentially break the plates, so thanks Spyglass for that one. I would be more inclined to do some contact prints first, just to see what I have, then decide if I want to enlarge any. I thought about even trying to use my 580ex to experiment with exposing them.

All of the plates have some degree of damage on the fringes, some worse than others. The plates measure 5 by 8 inches, are all dated 1894, and are signed by J. L. Rogers. They are in a box labeled Allen & Rowell Dry Plate. Several photos were taken in Nantucket, and several are of an estate labeled Hickory Hill, VA. I will post what I end up with.

Thanks everyone

Matt



Mar 23, 2009 at 02:31 AM





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