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Archive 2008 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?
  
 
lynxlea
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p.1 #1 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?


i mean usually we use CMYK to figure out how to correct skin tone
whereby lightroom 2.0 still cannot show CMYK numbers

so how to do this? if just develop psd first, without care about color correction,
then the advantages of using raw will be gone right?



Nov 27, 2008 at 01:47 PM
Hendrik
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p.1 #2 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?


Include a white balance card in your first frame and you're done. Simply click on the card for the correct white balance and sync the rest of your images. Repeat this when you change your light or sometimes also when you change props/clothing with color.


Nov 27, 2008 at 03:00 PM
cgardner
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p.1 #3 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?


If you are accustomed to judging skin tones by CYMK values doing the same with RGB numbers would simply be a matter of looking and the RGB values in previous images which have reproduced well and retraining your brain. But an inherent problem with the skin by numbers approach is that there is much variation in skin tone. That's why shooting a standard color reference (gray card) and setting custom WB when possible so color is neutral when first seen on the monitor is a much better approach.

Your apparent need to resorting to the "skin by numbers" technique would seem to indicate you may not be using a calibrated monitor which accurately predicts results. That's why the custom WB in the camera off a known gray card is so valuable for editing. If you do custom WB in the camera off the card and then shoot the card again with the custom WB in test shots it will have equal RGB values and should look perfectly neutral on your monitor. If it doesn't it indicates the monitor isn't calibrated for neutral color balance. The appearance of the card will tell you visually how it is off. Once you get the card looking neutral on the monitor within your editing application you'll have a consistent baseline for judging color. The card doesn't change person-to- person or shot-to-shot like skin tones do

That's not to say "neutral" will be the best looking color perceptually, only that its better to make your color editing decisions from a consistent starting baseline you can confirm with the only measurement tools you have: clicking on an image of the card - known to be neutral - and measuring the RGB values.



Nov 28, 2008 at 06:58 PM
FiveForm
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p.1 #4 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?


I carry the "Whibal" pocket gray card from rawworkflow.com. On click on the card in a test shot and all the image can be white balanced. From there, I can tweak to be warmer or cooler, per my preference...



Nov 29, 2008 at 09:04 PM
neil snape
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p.1 #5 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?


Thing is it's hard to get used to RGB numbers especially with a decimal point compared to reliable CMYK numbers. It is not about a calibrated monitor as that is a requirement. I haven't seen any monitor that doesn't drift, nor with fatigue that you can reliably say what the safe values would be visually. Of course if you can get used to rgb numbers so much the better. Yet I can't , having done too many years of press pages. Don't get me wrong, I was the one who wanted all the digital stuff workflow etc. I worked with many companies on making calibration and profiles easier to use. I fought and lost many a battle with prepress over acceptance of rgb files. Yet one thing that is all telling in skin tone is how much saturation you have by simply watching the Cyan values.

While here I have to say that white balance or preferably gray balance is helpful in variable light but with reliable flash in studio not really necessary. Variance in light, light incident angle, etc make it trickier than using a preset ( only if you have stable flash like Broncolor or ProPhoto.)



Jul 18, 2009 at 09:22 PM
 

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Peter Figen
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p.1 #6 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?


There's so much subjectivity in skintones that it's hard to use any numeric system to judge them by. I tend to like them a lot richer and warmer than fashion shooters, who often like more neutral tones. The numbers, RGB, CMYK or Lab are going to be all over the map. I've still got three good Sony Artisan's in the studio and they seem to be pretty damned good for judging skintones by eye. There are a lot of good alternatives to LR out there.


Jul 20, 2009 at 04:30 PM
KaaX
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p.1 #7 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?


I don't like "accurate" skin tones and most people I know also prefer "not-accurate" ones :-) The correct white balance is a good starting point at most and one needs to adjust the skin tones according to one's preferences.

By the way, the standard recommendation is to judge (numerically) skin tones by CMYK numbers because they're allegedly easier and more consistent. Does everyone think so or there are some advantages to RGB or Lab numbers?

Kaa



Jul 20, 2009 at 08:34 PM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #8 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?


The "traditional" by the numbers usually calls for roughly equal amounts of Magenta and Yellow with approximately one-third of those two in Cyan. But the key is approximately and different profile are going to give you different color mixes anyhow. Even though I've been a numbers guy for a long time, it's never made much sense for skintones.


Jul 20, 2009 at 08:42 PM
christo™
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p.1 #9 · how to correct skin color in lightroom?


Boy, I'd have to agree with Peter. Skin tones by numbers just doesn't make any sense. I suggest that instead of retraining yourself to RGB from CYMK that you just unlearn using numbers.

I also agree with you. If you have to resort to WB when using studio strobes, something in your studio is FUBAR.



Jul 23, 2009 at 05:06 PM





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