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High Res/Super Resolution not using the camera function
  
 
The Hexagonal
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · High Res/Super Resolution not using the camera function


So, since I am investigating a move from FF to m4/3, I came across this interesting feature, which is not really that new: the High-Res mode.

The first thing I wanted to find out was the time it took to do it. From the info I was able to find, the camera will take 8 shots, in 1 second, assemble the shots itself and assemble the single file.

Interesting.

But so is this article which I once used to try a super resolution photo:

https://petapixel.com/2015/02/21/a-practical-guide-to-creating-superresolution-photos-with-photoshop/

This technice works, but my then RX1 could only muster 4-5 frames per second. By comparison, the EM 1 II is doing 8 frames using the sensor shift function.

However...

If the EM 1 II can do 60fps in fixed focus RAW, has anyone tried to do something similar to what is described in the article? You see, in 1/4 of a second, you get 15 RAW shots. 15. In an 1/8 of a second you get 7 (let's say 7 worst case scenario) which would allow for more opportunities to get super resolution not only without a tripod, but also in not so quiet environments like a good sitting portrait, or a photo of a not so still landscape. The (apparently, from what I read) ISO, and aperture would not be limitations.

Yes, I am aware it will be more tedious to do it manually, but surely someone must have the need for this in a way they would be willing to give it a go?



Nov 04, 2017 at 06:30 PM
Bobg657
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · High Res/Super Resolution not using the camera function


Interesting, I would think shooting even four in a burst would improve noise and color and might overcome most movement issues. Iíll have to try at 60fps (which Iíve never used!) and see, even using LR might work.

TFS,
Bob



Nov 04, 2017 at 10:59 PM
The Hexagonal
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · High Res/Super Resolution not using the camera function


Bobg657 wrote:
Interesting, I would think shooting even four in a burst would improve noise and color and might overcome most movement issues. Iíll have to try at 60fps (which Iíve never used!) and see, even using LR might work.

TFS,
Bob


This may be a hidden golden ticket (60fps) for super resolution, albeit a more manual approach.

If you do try, please report back!





Nov 05, 2017 at 10:48 AM
sapro
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · High Res/Super Resolution not using the camera function


In fact, 60FPS might not be ideal. Since each photosensor can only record one color, other colors are interpolated from neighboring photosensors, to get super resolution, ideally you want photosensors to shift a little bit to record different colors at each frame.


Nov 07, 2017 at 11:44 PM
 

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Bob Kane
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · High Res/Super Resolution not using the camera function


The Hexagonal wrote:
This may be a hidden golden ticket (60fps) for super resolution, albeit a more manual approach.

If you do try, please report back!



I use this technique all the time. It works well in many circumstances (never makes things worse), and can make a large difference in quality. You may see less improvement the better the glass, exposure, and technique but the hassle is often worth it. Critics will claim that you are making up pixels without understanding how it works (admittedly, my grasp of the mathematics is pretty poor) but the proof is in the pudding. If it works for you, great. It often gives results as good as those from PhotoAcute. That program does alignment better and can work with moving subjects (within reason) by taking elements from one image. At the very least, stacking, aligning, and averaging in PSCC or CS6 Extended can completely eliminate noise. It's great for getting clean images at night at high ISO, in part by minimizing exposure time. Give it a shot (so to speak).



Nov 08, 2017 at 01:09 AM
Ernie Aubert
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · High Res/Super Resolution not using the camera function


"... stacking, aligning, and averaging in PSCC or CS6 Extended can completely eliminate noise."

Never been exposed to this concept; it sure sounds good. I know about focus stacking; I use Zerene Stacker for that. It does alignment, but averaging is unknown to me. I have CS6. Could you point me to some tutorial about what you're meaning here? I sure would like to be able to eliminate noise.



Nov 08, 2017 at 02:27 AM
sapro
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · High Res/Super Resolution not using the camera function


Ernie Aubert wrote:
"... stacking, aligning, and averaging in PSCC or CS6 Extended can completely eliminate noise."

Never been exposed to this concept; it sure sounds good. I know about focus stacking; I use Zerene Stacker for that. It does alignment, but averaging is unknown to me. I have CS6. Could you point me to some tutorial about what you're meaning here? I sure would like to be able to eliminate noise.


1) Open all images as layers in Photoshop;
2) Select all layers;
3) Image->Auto-Align Layers...;
4) Layer->Smart Object->Convert to Smart Object;
5) Layer->Smart Object->Stack Mode->Median



Nov 08, 2017 at 04:46 AM
Ernie Aubert
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · High Res/Super Resolution not using the camera function


Thanks, sapro. I haven't even explored layers yet, so I think I have my work cut out for me!


Nov 08, 2017 at 02:11 PM







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