Home · Register · Software · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username  

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Fuji Forum | Join Upload & Sell

  

One great Fuji benefit, teaching!
  
 
cputeq
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


So I start teaching a free introductory photography class in a few days and thought I would say not only do I love using my XT2, it also makes teaching easier. Who would have thought external dials would make things more simple?

I saw this when I first taught my wife using my XT1. She had a hard time understanding what the numbers on her (at the time NEX5) meant, so I whipped out the XT1 and explained using it... Piece of cake and she caught on rather quickly.

Now I have a class of about 10 starting their first course (consisting of 3x 2hr classes) and I am excited to get to the exposure triangle piece, hoping the dials do their magic again haha.





Nov 03, 2017 at 11:11 AM
leighton w
Online
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


cputeq wrote:
So I start teaching a free introductory photography class in a few days and thought I would say not only do I love using my XT2, it also makes teaching easier. Who would have thought external dials would make things more simple?

I saw this when I first taught my wife using my XT1. She had a hard time understanding what the numbers on her (at the time NEX5) meant, so I whipped out the XT1 and explained using it... Piece of cake and she caught on rather quickly.

Now I have a class of about 10 starting their first course
...Show more

Never thought of that, it comes so naturally. Good luck with your class.



Nov 03, 2017 at 11:54 AM
cgrille
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


I would take an old cheap film camera where I could open the film door and show how the different apertures and exposure times influence the opening against a light every time.


Nov 03, 2017 at 12:11 PM
dmacmillan
Online
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


It sure beats PASM! Good luck with your photography classes. I've been teaching continuing education photography classes off and on for over 35 years. It's always fun to get an enthusiastic class.

I encouraged my students to bring in their work to share and get a critique, if they wanted one. One student brought in a nice photo of the Australian Uluru (Ayers Rock). The only problem with the image was a slight amount of atmospheric haze. I asked him: "Did you use a haze filter on your camera?". He replied: "No, the haze was already there."



Nov 03, 2017 at 12:43 PM
rdeloe
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


+1 to the old film camera. I bought a nice old Pentax Spotmatic and 50mm Takumar for exactly this purpose. It makes a nice bridge between the DSLRs the students are holding in their hands, and the earlier days of photography. They can actually see the mirror go up and down, the aperture opening and closing, etc.

cgrille wrote:
I would take an old cheap film camera where I could open the film door and show how the different apertures and exposure times influence the opening against a light every time.





Nov 03, 2017 at 01:45 PM
taemo
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


cgrille wrote:
I would take an old cheap film camera where I could open the film door and show how the different apertures and exposure times influence the opening against a light every time.


this is another great suggestion.
I like opening the film door of my film cameras and seeing the different apertures and firing at different exposure times.



Nov 03, 2017 at 01:46 PM
cgrille
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


taemo wrote:
this is another great suggestion.
I like opening the film door of my film cameras and seeing the different apertures and firing at different exposure times.


I remember in my childhood I liked to see this for the first time, too, at my father's 'Dacora Super Dignette' camera.



Nov 03, 2017 at 01:56 PM
gdanmitchell
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


cputeq wrote:
So I start teaching a free introductory photography class in a few days and thought I would say not only do I love using my XT2, it also makes teaching easier. Who would have thought external dials would make things more simple?

I saw this when I first taught my wife using my XT1. She had a hard time understanding what the numbers on her (at the time NEX5) meant, so I whipped out the XT1 and explained using it... Piece of cake and she caught on rather quickly.

Now I have a class of about 10 starting their first course
...Show more

This makes complete sense, and for multiple reasons.

First, it is just simpler to see the adjustments when they are done via physical controls with displays of the selected settings, as opposed to going into a menu, remembering which unlabeled knob to turn, etc.

Second, once settings have been made it is possible to quickly verify them later if one forgets.

Third, you can more easily apply the old rules-of-thumb such as "move one click this way to compensate for moving that thing one click the other way."

That said, I've begun to think in recent years that it can be better to forego a lot of the technical stuff right at the beginning and instead focus on image-making. The old approach was to (necessarily) focus on all the settings and their meanings first, and only much later become serious about "seeing." By using cameras with automatic settings at first, this approach can be flipped on its head...

Dan



Nov 03, 2017 at 04:35 PM
rdeloe
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


I use Ben Long's Complete Digital Photography, 9th edition, as a resource in my course. I think he shares your view Dan. He covers all the basics of exposure, how lenses work, etc. But he's not afraid to advise people to use the automatic settings so the focus can be on other more important things.

I do cover a lot of technical ground in my course because I want the students to know why things work, or don't work. For instance, we took a short but deep dive into colour models, colour spaces, etc. this week because I want them to understand how to get the most from every output device (cell phone, computer monitor, printer). But it's a big chunk to swallow. Mostly, though, we keep our eye on the prize so we focus on things like the idea, the subject, light and composition. These are "technical" topics too, but in a different way that is more immediately relevant to making photographs for them.


gdanmitchell wrote:
That said, I've begun to think in recent years that it can be better to forego a lot of the technical stuff right at the beginning and instead focus on image-making. The old approach was to (necessarily) focus on all the settings and their meanings first, and only much later become serious about "seeing." By using cameras with automatic settings at first, this approach can be flipped on its head...

Dan





Nov 03, 2017 at 05:15 PM
gdanmitchell
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


rdeloe wrote:
I use Ben Long's Complete Digital Photography, 9th edition, as a resource in my course. I think he shares your view Dan. He covers all the basics of exposure, how lenses work, etc. But he's not afraid to advise people to use the automatic settings so the focus can be on other more important things.

I do cover a lot of technical ground in my course because I want the students to know why things work, or don't work. For instance, we took a short but deep dive into colour models, colour spaces, etc. this week because I want them to
...Show more

Cool.

Apologies in advance for what may be a lengthy and somewhat nerdy post. Those who aren't interested are free to stop here.

<detour into the field of music>

I have a long background as a college faculty member teaching a non-photographic subject that was affected by technology changes a bit before they hit our photography world. In my case, this is in the field of electronic music, where I had to readapt my approach to introductory-level classes.

When I started teaching the subject we were in an analog world, where our instruments ("synthesizers") consisted of separate and independent modules, each of which performed a set of specialized functions by itself. These modules had to be interlinked by means of physical cables (at first) and (later) by other means of signal routing.

These instruments did not "contain any preset sounds," which is a way of saying that the operator had to understand the technical underpinnings of electroacoustic first in order to even produce a sound, with the eventual ability to focus on musical concepts coming much later. Consequently, introductory courses began with a pretty heavy does of technical stuff.

A few years later instrument designers recognized that most users were mostly doing some pretty similar things, and they began to design instruments that were configured for these tasks by default. This reduced the level of technical understanding needed to operate the instruments. But the biggest change came a bit later when the designers began to incorporate preset "sounds" into the instruments —  a few at first, soon a standard 128 instrument set, and eventually just about any sound that a typical user would likely want.

Suddenly, it was almost unnecessary to know much of the technical stuff at all in order to get started. The old model (learn electroacoustic first, and only later address musical issues) was turned on its head. My teaching "flipped" – after minimal technical introduction we plunge into music making immediately. Then, as interest increases and as warranted, we look more deeply at the underlying technical stuff, the "how it works" part. And, inevitably, most of the best students eventually "get it" and become fascinated at some level.

</detour ends>

We now find ourselves in a very similar (though not quite identical) situation with contemporary digital cameras, whether they are in smartphones, in point and shoot cameras, or in the mirrorless/dslr space. It doesn't take long at all to get enough technical knowledge to begin focusing on image-making. Essentially, where we used to have to start with an understanding of basics (loading film, ASA/ISO, aperture, shutter speed, manual focusing, DOF, etc) we can now pay less attention to those things initially, and instead focus our efforts on how to see photographically.

Necessarily, as students gain proficiency in "seeing," and as they observe a larger range of photography, answers to the "how did he/she do that?" questions will lead them and their teachers to look at the technical matters with increasing interest — but probably to regard them as a means to an end and not as the primary focus. And, as you point out, having knobs and dials and switches on the cameras can make it easier to understand these things.

Call me an optimist, but I think this will lead to more and even better photographers!

The



Nov 03, 2017 at 06:15 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



rbf_
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


I didn't know you were a music Professor Dan. What an interesting comparison between teaching music and photography. I had a number of friends who were musicians growing up and remember there was a technical side but didn't know much about it myself.

I agree with both your and rdeloe's assessment that we can get away from front loading photography education with the technical aspects. As the student grows they can do deep dive's on the technical aspects as their photography progresses. I also remember a lot of practice involved in order to get your manual focus skills accurate and fast. There was a lot of time you needed to invest before you got to making productive images in the old days. I'm optimistic as well.




Nov 03, 2017 at 09:33 PM
gdanmitchell
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


rbf_ wrote:
I didn't know you were a music Professor Dan. What an interesting comparison between teaching music and photography. I had a number of friends who were musicians growing up and remember there was a technical side but didn't know much about it myself.

I agree with both your and rdeloe's assessment that we can get away from front loading photography education with the technical aspects. As the student grows they can do deep dive's on the technical aspects as their photography progresses. I also remember a lot of practice involved in order to get your manual focus skills accurate and fast.
...Show more

It is actually astonishing how many well-known photographers are also accomplished musicians.

I've been a photographer forever, balancing that part of my life with music and teaching. There was a fork in the road in front of me many years ago, and I had to choose one path for my academic life. In retrospect it could have been either fork.

Dan



Nov 03, 2017 at 10:30 PM
rbf_
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!



Yeah come to think of it my father was also he played the guitar. I don't know what counts as accomplished however.



Nov 03, 2017 at 11:41 PM
benee
Online
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!



Very cool to hear! Where/what do you teach? I have 2 music degrees (voice perf) myself! I do feel there’s a real resonance between the world of music and photography.
gdanmitchell wrote:
It is actually astonishing how many well-known photographers are also accomplished musicians.

I've been a photographer forever, balancing that part of my life with music and teaching. There was a fork in the road in front of me many years ago, and I had to choose one path for my academic life. In retrospect it could have been either fork.

Dan




Nov 04, 2017 at 12:43 AM
cputeq
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


cgrille wrote:
I would take an old cheap film camera where I could open the film door and show how the different apertures and exposure times influence the opening against a light every time.


well I don't have a film camera, but I have 'good enough ' -- I have a Pentax 50/1.4 and Samyang 85/1.4 (adapted to Fuji), so I can show aperture

Bonus - I get to teach them about adapting



Nov 04, 2017 at 01:36 AM
cputeq
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


gdanmitchell wrote:
That said, I've begun to think in recent years that it can be better to forego a lot of the technical stuff right at the beginning and instead focus on image-making.
Dan


Absolutely correct, which is why my first class is about nothing but composition

Class 2: Exposure triangle (part 1) and natural/artificial light (part 2)

Class 3: Camera 'technicals' , sorta like what all that 'stuff' means about a camera (the technicals) and part 2 is basic post-processing (very introductory)




Nov 04, 2017 at 01:38 AM
gdanmitchell
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


benee wrote:
Very cool to hear! Where/what do you teach? I have 2 music degrees (voice perf) myself! I do feel there’s a real resonance between the world of music and photography.



Until a few months ago I was a full-time faculty member at De Anza College in Cupertino. I still teach a few classes each year, but my life now is focused almost entirely on photography!



Nov 04, 2017 at 06:41 PM
charles.K
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


cputeq wrote:
So I start teaching a free introductory photography class in a few days and thought I would say not only do I love using my XT2, it also makes teaching easier. Who would have thought external dials would make things more simple?

I saw this when I first taught my wife using my XT1. She had a hard time understanding what the numbers on her (at the time NEX5) meant, so I whipped out the XT1 and explained using it... Piece of cake and she caught on rather quickly.

Now I have a class of about 10 starting their first course
...Show more

Ergonomics Kudos to Fuji for listening to photographers. Often the analogue and feel of dial gauges is more intuitive and faster to process information. A case in point is the old analogue clock face. You don't need to process 4 bits of information and decide it is about 1/4 to 11am. It is about the approximation of feel. Also most aircraft have both dial gauges and digital displays. The dial gauges for the feel, rate of change and the digital for recording precise values.




Nov 04, 2017 at 11:40 PM
doc4x5
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · One great Fuji benefit, teaching!


I too am of the "old school" and concentrated on technical things like the Zone System and endless measurements with a densitometer. This was also a time when most "real photographers" were men, often old men. Now young men and women are doing some of the most creative photography out there. If they can do it without having to master technical issues, more power to them. I do agree that those photographers who grew up in the digital era have a different approach than those of us from the film era, not worse, just different. I used to look down my nose at those who had less technical understanding than I did but no longer. Now I look at the image, the end product. I also do agree that understanding technical issues will make one a better photographer; one needn't do it first. Get out there and make images. If they are terrible, find out why; if they are great, find out why.


Nov 05, 2017 at 01:34 AM







FM Forums | Fuji Forum | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username     Reset password