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Preparing for Corporate Headshots during a business event...
  
 
GabrielPhoto
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Preparing for Corporate Headshots during a business event...need some advice please.


Hello!

So I normally do just Portraiture, fashion, etc. but soon I will have a photobooth during a big Business convention and will be offering Headshots to the participants.
I do have some questions as I have never been in such an event.
First, the organizer mentioned maybe I wanted to create a pre-registration for the participants as she will be promoting my Headshot booth.
I wonder if that is something I can add to my Squarespace page for example. She sent me an example with a similar activity in California where the photographers have different options to select as well after the event when purchasing your headshots.

As far as lighting I am taking a 5x7 portable white/gray backdrop (not sure which one yet as mine is black and gray so need another one). May also test my 56" fotodiox softbox with the diffuser as the backdrop to see if that works better.
As main light it will either be my Mola Setti (with diffuser for the first time ever) or my SMDV A90 36" softbox. And to fill either my Eye Lighter or a reflector depending if the person likes or not the Eyelighter catch lights.

I plan to have my Laptop as well for tethering into C1.

What do you guys think so far? What else do you suggest? I also need a way to keep track of the person's, addresses and which photos belong to them. I always deal with smaller groups either a family or just models so this is a part of the workflow I am not used to.
Thanks!




Sep 30, 2017 at 02:49 AM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Preparing for Corporate Headshots during a business event...need some advice please.


I've never done anything quite like that but when doing casting sessions, we always have the person write their name and contact info on a card and include that in the first shot of that person. If you have an on the ball assistant who actually knows Capture One, you could also create a new session for each person with their name as the session name. Still need that card with the rest of their info though.


Sep 30, 2017 at 08:38 AM
leethecam
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Preparing for Corporate Headshots during a business event...need some advice please.


Now this all depends on how many headshots you are expecting / required to do in a day.

I shoot mass headshots for Linkedin and have hit over 150 people in a 6 hr session, with each headshot being the same quality as a full blown studio session - so hopefully I've got this down to a fine art. With this sort of volume there is no scope for retouching and any post work is mere seconds per shot. I'm Linkedin's sole preferred UK photographer for their UK corporate clients/events so I must be doing something right...

This is how I approach it...

I use Profoto throughout for absolute consistency.

Main key light is either a 3x4 softbox or (modified) Profoto BD with sock and centred.

Reflector underneath but as part of the Lastolite Triflector so I have a speedy option of just popping up a side reflector within seconds.

I shoot tethered for my ease of mind and so participants can choose their favourite. Much faster than staring on a small LCD and it ensures no post production back home. I use Capture One as it is reliable and very fast. I use GoodSync to make simultanous backups to a USB stick in the background as I work - invaluable and cheap.

Backgrounds are either white or mid grey, (so I have option of adding a colour).

White background lit with two softboxes either side and I use a rather wonderful white fleece material that just absorbs the light so beautifully and virtually no bounce back - lit to 2/3 stop over. I aim for a perfect 100% white. I'm in the UK and I get it from here: http://viewfinderphotography.co.uk/new-wrinkle-free-10x20ft-highkey-backdrop

Grey background lit from single strobe on very low floor stand, directly behind seated subject and agled to give a gentle gradient - so usually horizontally angled to the floor. Gives a great look and with a colour gel (I like a 1/2 CTB) looks wonderful. I use a slightly cut down roll so it just fits in my MPV vehicle.

Hairlights are different depending on the background. With the white background I'm using them more as head rim lights, whereas the grey/clour background I use a small gridded softbox on a boom, directly behind the subject - but often with a couple of rim lights as I would with the white background.

Subject is always seated to keep them in one place and so I can sit too, (they're long days...!)

Sandbags - everywhere...! People are stupid and gravity is unforgiving.

Tape for every cable...! People are stupid...

I average 2-3 mins with each person and half of that is teaching them some quick pose techniques. Amazing what you can do in just a minute of tutorials.

I shoot landscape format and crop to 10x8. I find this works better for me and it crops nicely to square or the new circle for Linkedin afterwards.

Becasue I'm blessed with Profoto, I use the Air remote a lot, which is great for disabling rim/hairlights in a moment.

I carry a small makeup kit. All Mac, all blotting pressed powder. I use NW25, NW30, NW35, Medium, Dark, Deep Dark and some blotting tissues. Takes 30 seconds to kill the worst highlights and makes a huge difference. Experience allows me to know exactly what powder to use, but essentially you're matching to skin tone. Just use very lightly and just on the nose, above eyebrows, a little on cheek highlights and maybe over the top lip. We're talking a quick fix here.

I never get more adventurous than F4 on a 5D3. Better to have solid shots than missed arty ones.

Huge amount of personal energy required. I usually have a queue / audience and it requires a certain personality to keep the unruly crowds under control (as they often try to distract) and keep the unfortunate subject from feeling nervous. Tell them every frame is amazing, but we can do EVEN better...!

As to taking names... I've either had a person taking details or I have a simple list that they write (in capitals) their email address and the file number of their favourite image, (which I grade with a star anyway). If you have on that form a short line that says you can use the images for your own promotional purposes, then that frees you up with respect to modelling rights if you want to use them for your site.

I only deliver images that have the star I've given them. That means one image per subject, otherwise you're there forever in post. Often deliver no more than 3000px at the longest edge, (so perfect for a 10x8 print). I upload to my own server and use a simple hyperlink to enable downloads as a complete set for the host client.

Creting new sessions for each person will slow you down and although I know some people have the subject write their name on a paper for the first frame, I didtched that quickly as it slows things right down in post. My preferred delivery is below...

As to delivery, I always hand that off to the host company, (who in turn usually hand it to an unsuspecting intern to handle), and they just email out the appropriate image when asked for it - based on a simple mini website that I create with JuiceBoxBuilder Pro and host on my server. (Doesn't like 3/4G connections but is great on regular internet / wifi etc.)

I can do the delivery for the host client, but that is at an extra charge. But that mini website with file names under each image is a great way to go.

Simple is always good with these things, (although I can end up with 6 strobes rigged at times). Speed is dependent on the length of your queue...!

Remember your colour balance card, (there is nothing as good as a Kodak Grey Card). and ensure your meter is perfectly calibrated.

And have fun. Your energy translates to great images.



Sep 30, 2017 at 09:59 AM
GabrielPhoto
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Preparing for Corporate Headshots during a business event...need some advice please.


leethecam wrote:
Now this all depends on how many headshots you are expecting / required to do in a day.

I shoot mass headshots for Linkedin and have hit over 150 people in a 6 hr session, with each headshot being the same quality as a full blown studio session - so hopefully I've got this down to a fine art. With this sort of volume there is no scope for retouching and any post work is mere seconds per shot. I'm Linkedin's sole preferred UK photographer for their UK corporate clients/events so I must be doing something right...

This is how I approach
...Show more

Extremely detailed and helpful post.. thank you so much for this!



Sep 30, 2017 at 03:27 PM
 

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sungphoto
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Preparing for Corporate Headshots during a business event...need some advice please.


Generally for these types of assembly-line mass corporate headshot type situations, I go for the most forgiving soft modifier that I can fit into the venue. I'd leave the mola demi at home because you're going to spend too much time finding the sweet spot for each person, and non-model skin and features aren't nearly as forgiving. I'd agree with the other poster that either a 2x3 ft or 3x4 ft softbox, or a 36-48" octa would be the best way to go. I'm more of a fan of using a small strip box like a 12x36" as bottom fill over a reflector for these types of high volume shoots as you can dial in and out the level of contrast without running back and forth from the subject (assuming you're not using an assistant). I generally forgo a rim/hair light for these types of shoots as well in order to only have two lighting variables to have to work with. Tethering is a good idea in order to give your subjects immediate feedback in terms of posing.

I'd highly recommend the westcott x-drop as a backdrop for a job like this. It's the perfect size for a waist up portrait or tight headshot. I've never liked the reflector type collapsible backdrops as they tend to retain a bit of curve in the frame even if you let them sit overnight (which kind of defeats the purpose of a quick pop up background) and even the higher quality ones still have a bit of texture on the white side.



Oct 13, 2017 at 09:24 PM
GabrielPhoto
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Preparing for Corporate Headshots during a business event...need some advice please.


I actually have the Setti but I did leave it home for those reasons and instead went with my SMDV A90 and the Eyelighter for very flattering portraits.
It was VERY interesting experience to work under that setup with limited space and time. Not exactly what I would like to do often but I still got to take a headshot of one of the original members of Shark Tank , Kevin Harrington so that was great.

I did like Tethering and having them select favorites on the spot when possible. I used a Lastolite white backdrop although I may return it because it came with stains and not fond on how wrinkled it gets..even though I was exposing to around 240s on the White so it kind of does not matter.
Will look into that Westcott one. I noticed so so reviews so far but not sure if its just the user issues. I will read more and maybe PM you to get more feedback about it cause I do like the concept of it!

Thanks!



Oct 14, 2017 at 03:59 PM
sungphoto
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Preparing for Corporate Headshots during a business event...need some advice please.


I've tried a ton of different location backdrop setups and the x-drop is my fave so far. Obviously if your shoot is local a 53" roll of seamless would be best for headshots, but I like that I can just pack the x-drop down and throw it into my big light kit roller.

I've checked out pretty much all of the collapsible reflector style backdrops at B&H and Adorama, and regardless of whether they have Savage or Impact on them, they are all pretty much the same and have the same issues that you had with your lastolite.

For a while when I'd fly with my backdrop kit, I'd just bring a 4x6 ft roll of white medium weight neoprene (scuba suit material essentially) and that actually works amazing. You can ball it up and then take it out, and there are no wrinkles once you stretch it onto a backdrop stand with a few A-clamps. Also because it has a decent weight to it, it drapes well and doesn't ripple. Ultimately I just got to a point with my checked light bag that it was too heavy to remain under the 50 lb limit with the neoprene and stand, which is why I checked out the x-drop.

If you pick one up, there are deals right now that include both the white and black backdrop which is a good deal. The grey backdrop is nice though when you are constrained for space, and have to have the subject closer to the backdrop than preferred.



Oct 15, 2017 at 01:43 AM







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