Home · Register · Software · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username  

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Fuji Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       3       end
  

GFX users
  
 
fishjump
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · GFX users


My wife is amazed how fast I can move when the light is fading.


Sep 24, 2017 at 12:58 AM
chez
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · GFX users


I typically arrive early to my location, setup my composition on a tripod and then wait for the light to happen. I like the journey just as much as the destination so it's a nice slow paced mode for me. There are times I'm on a beach having a glass or 2 of wine while I wait for the light. Too much of the rest of my life is hurried...will never let it creep into my landscape photography.


Sep 24, 2017 at 01:44 AM
gdanmitchell
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · GFX users


fishjump wrote:
My wife is amazed how fast I can move when the light is fading.


:-)



Sep 24, 2017 at 05:33 AM
molson
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · GFX users


fishjump wrote:
My wife is amazed how fast I can move when the light is fading.


My wife is amazed (or is it annoyed?) at how long I can stand in one place waiting for the light to change...



Sep 24, 2017 at 03:46 PM
gdanmitchell
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · GFX users


molson wrote:
My wife is amazed (or is it annoyed?) at how long I can stand in one place waiting for the light to change...


My wife — who is also a photographer — has adapted. ;-)

I do not work in any one particular way. It really depends on the situation and the subject. With the range of subjects I photograph and the range of conditions in which I pursue my photography, I adapt my working process to the subject and circumstances. Sometimes slow and contemplative is the ideal approach. Sometimes fast and intuitive is more effective.

For example, when I'm photographing migratory winter birds I may work quite quickly. Turn your head and you won't know that I made a photograph. But this can happen with landscape photography, too. Some subjects are extraordinarily fleeting and their appearance cannot always be predicted — effects of light and atmosphere, clouds, a person appearing fortuitously in the scene. When these things appear, I sometimes have to move with extreme speed or the subject will be gone. (I have plenty of examples of subjects where this happened and I perhaps managed to get two or three frames — and you can see that the magic is gone by the last one.)

Here is one example. Recently I was in the Sierra backcountry for 9 days with a group of fellow photographers. On this evening I had been photographing my intended subject in a more contemplative manner, slowly exploring a particular bit of trail-less landscape. I happened to look up and see this light on these peaks with the dark sky from storm clouds, and I knew it wasn't going to last. I very quickly set up my tripod, put a relatively long lens on the camera, and made about three exposures. This light lasted literally seconds before clouds to the west blocked it.







Yet, on the same trip (and in almost the same location) on a different day, in the morning instead of the evening, I headed to this alpine meadow and spent several hours wandering around slowly, carefully considering the photographic possibilities. I had actually thought of this particular subject and location for about a week, since I had first seen it near the start of the trip, and I had probably revisited it as many as a half dozen other times already. There was no hurry at all about making this image, and I recall spending time carefully tweaking tripod position and height, the framing of the scene, and even waiting patiently for the breeze to die down and provide the right sort of reflections.







I'm not making a claim that either is necessarily a Great Photograph — whatever that even means — but I'm clear that, for me at least, it is important to be able to operate both slowly and quickly in varying circumstances. (And, as I realized after posting the two photographs together, there is nothing in their appearance that would give away the very different approaches I used. They both seem like very "quiet" images to me.)

Now, let me loop that back to my earlier post about the idea that miniMF cameras might "force" one to work more slowly. Regardless of how you feel about the idea that this would be a virtue, I think — as I mentioned earlier — that a close look at the Fujifilm GFX reveals that Fujifilm actually went to a lot of work to ensure that it is not a camera that forces you to work slowly. In fact, its modern interface is much like that of typical DSLRs, and very little like that of old-school film systems that, arguably, were harder to operate quickly.

If you really do want a camera that doesn't allow you to work quickly... the Fujifilm GFX is clearly not that camera.



Edited on Sep 25, 2017 at 01:59 PM · View previous versions



Sep 24, 2017 at 05:05 PM
molson
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · GFX users


It all depends on the situation. In the first image, I spent a couple of hours in -20ºC cold (constantly feeding batteries to my A7R) waiting for the sunset at the winters solstice at this ancient archaeological site.

To capture the second image, I started driving faster and faster looking for a foreground as I saw the morning light start to hit the clouds. I was doing about 90 mph to get to this location where I could set up the camera and start shooting - and in a couple of minutes it was all over.






Majorville Medicine Wheel, Alberta







Elk Range Sunrise, Kananaskis




Sep 24, 2017 at 05:38 PM
chez
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · GFX users


As I mentioned previously, my approach to landscape photography is slow and methodical. I know the image I want, I get to the location with plenty of time to spare and I setup my composition and wait for the right light. I know where and when the sun is going to rise / set and what parts of the landscape will be illuminated by the light. This has all been calculated way ahead of time so I have no surprises. Now all I have to do is sit and wait for Mother Nature to do her part and show up...which does not occur many times. I still enjoy getting out in these times even if I don't come back with the image I set out to get. There is always next time.

I save my run-n-gun photography for my street shooting...with landscapes it a slow methodical process for me.
























Sep 24, 2017 at 06:51 PM
JimKasson
Offline

Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · GFX users


Herb wrote:
Why did you purchase this as opposed to either Canon, Sony or Nikon 50mp cameras?


I bought the GFX because I like squarer photos than 3:2 and thought it could be a multiformat camera with adapted lenses.

That works well, but what surprised me was the quality of the native lenses. 4 are spectacular, and one is merely excellent.

I believe the ultimate strength of the camera lies in the lens lineup.

I have not sold my a7RIIs, but am using them far less frequently. I still use an a9 and D5, but their strengths are in different areas.

Jim




Sep 24, 2017 at 07:53 PM
Steve Spencer
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · GFX users


Herb wrote:
Why did you purchase this as opposed to either Canon, Sony or Nikon 50mp cameras?


Part of the reason I got the GFX was that I have a preference for squarer images much of the time. Second I liked the lenses that could be adapted and the combinations of kits of lenses I could create with those lenses. Third, I liked the idea of the tilt/swivel EVF, and in practice I like it even more than I thought I would. Finally, I like the idea of being about to use leaf shutter lenses with the system for high flash sync at full power.



Sep 25, 2017 at 05:47 AM
Daan B
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · GFX users


Steve Spencer wrote:
Finally, I like the idea of being about to use leaf shutter lenses with the system for high flash sync at full power.


What leaf lenses are there for the GFX?



Sep 25, 2017 at 06:05 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 

        


Steve Spencer
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #11 · p.2 #11 · GFX users


Daan B wrote:
What leaf lenses are there for the GFX?


You can use all the Hasselblad HC lenses as leaf shutter lenses with the GFX.



Sep 25, 2017 at 11:34 AM
molson
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #12 · p.2 #12 · GFX users


Steve Spencer wrote:
You can use all the Hasselblad HC lenses as leaf shutter lenses with the GFX.


Or, if you're a Fuji purist, you can search out Fujinon GX645AF lenses...

Fuji made the HC lenses for Hasselblad, and marketed them under the Fujinon brand in Japan, along with their GX645AF medium-format film camera.



Sep 25, 2017 at 01:46 PM
molson
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #13 · p.2 #13 · GFX users


chez wrote:
I save my run-n-gun photography for my street shooting...with landscapes it a slow methodical process for me.



Sometimes, you only have time for a quick grab shot, chez...








Sep 25, 2017 at 01:48 PM
JimKasson
Offline

Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #14 · p.2 #14 · GFX users


Steve Spencer wrote:
You can use all the Hasselblad HC lenses as leaf shutter lenses with the GFX.


I could never make that work. The adapter appeared to recognize the lens, and the Fp shutter worked fine, but when I turned on the leaf shutter, the camera locked up. I have now sold all my HC lenses, so I can't try it anymore.

Jim




Sep 25, 2017 at 02:33 PM
Steve Spencer
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #15 · p.2 #15 · GFX users


JimKasson wrote:
I could never make that work. The adapter appeared to recognize the lens, and the Fp shutter worked fine, but when I turned on the leaf shutter, the camera locked up. I have now sold all my HC lenses, so I can't try it anymore.

Jim



Mine works just fine and the button on the adapter calls up the menu to change between leaf shutter and focal plane shutter. The sound difference is quite obvious, so it is clear which shutter you are using. I suspect you got a bum adapter and that was your problem. Mine has worked flawlessly since I got it.



Sep 25, 2017 at 02:43 PM
JimKasson
Offline

Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #16 · p.2 #16 · GFX users


Steve Spencer wrote:
Mine works just fine and the button on the adapter calls up the menu to change between leaf shutter and focal plane shutter. The sound difference is quite obvious, so it is clear which shutter you are using. I suspect you got a bum adapter and that was your problem. Mine has worked flawlessly since I got it.


Glad it worked out for you. The button on my adapter worked like yours, but no leaf shutter operation. BTW, none of the HC lenses that I tested -- 35, 50-110, 80 (x2), 120 I, and 150 -- could hold a candle to the native Fuji ones. I've been told that those are the worst HC lenses by a guy with an X1D. Are you using the HCD lenses? Are they as good as the Fuji G lenses?

Jim




Sep 25, 2017 at 02:53 PM
Steve Spencer
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #17 · p.2 #17 · GFX users


JimKasson wrote:
Glad it worked out for you. The button on my adapter worked like yours, but no leaf shutter operation. BTW, none of the HC lenses that I tested -- 35, 50-110, 80 (x2), 120 I, and 150 -- could hold a candle to the native Fuji ones. I've been told that those are the worst HC lenses by a guy with an X1D. Are you using the HCD lenses? Are they as good as the Fuji G lenses?

Jim



I am using a number of HC lenses and yes if you look at Hassy's MTFs (and especially the 35mm, which is in bad need of a refresh) then it would seem those are not among the sharpest HC lenses. I have the HCD 24 f/4.8, the HC 100 f/2.2; and the HC 300 f/4.5. All are sharp enough for me and very good performers. I haven't compared them to the native Fuji lenses, but I wouldn't be surprised if the 23 f/4 was as good as the HCD 24 or even a bit better. That looks like an excellent lens. I also wouldn't be surprised if the Fuji 110 f/2 was in some ways better than the HC 100 f/2.2, but I think which one you prefer there probably goes down to which rendering you prefer and I find the HC 100's rendering very much to my liking. It reminds me in many ways of the Leica R 80 f/1.4. Not super sharp wide open, but a very nice look for portraits. As it stops down, however, it is super sharp. The bokeh is absolutely lovely on that lens as well. I can post some samples if you would like. The HC 300 f/4.5 of course does not have a native Fuji equivalent and Fuji might not ever make a lens that long, who knows.

So, I can't really recommend getting the HCD 24 f/4.8, even though it is excellent, as the Fuji 23 is likely at least as good and cheaper, but I still think I could recommend the HC 100, and the HC 300 f/4.5 is of course a lens that doesn't have a native Fuji equivalent. I'm not sure the HC 150 f/3.2 will ever have a real equivalent either, and I am also interested in the HC 50 f/3.5 II as that is a very sharp well corrected lens (I would not be surprised if in at least some ways it outperforms the Fuji 45 f/2.8), and of course the HC lenses have leaf shutters and that is something the native Fuji lenses will not. So, I still think there is a place for the HC lenses, in my kit anyway, but I can certainly see why many people would want to go with Native Fuji lenses.



Sep 25, 2017 at 03:08 PM
JimKasson
Offline

Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #18 · p.2 #18 · GFX users


Steve Spencer wrote:
I am using a number of HC lenses and yes if you look at Hassy's MTFs (and especially the 35mm, which is in bad need of a refresh) then it would seem those are not among the sharpest HC lenses. I have the HCD 24 f/4.8, the HC 100 f/2.2; and the HC 300 f/4.5. All are sharp enough for me and very good performers. I haven't compared them to the native Fuji lenses, but I wouldn't be surprised if the 23 f/4 was as good as the HCD 24 or even a bit better. That looks like an
...Show more

Thanks. I'm using the Zeiss 135/2 Apo-Sonnar as my 150ish lens, and the Leica 280/4 Apo-Telyt-R as my 300ish lens. I have a standing order in for the Fuji 250 when it ships. I did try the V-mount 250 SA, and it performed pretty well on the GFX, but I didn't like the ergonomics.

Jim




Sep 25, 2017 at 03:25 PM
Steve Spencer
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #19 · p.2 #19 · GFX users


JimKasson wrote:
Thanks. I'm using the Zeiss 135/2 Apo-Sonnar as my 150ish lens, and the Leica 280/4 Apo-Telyt-R as my 300ish lens. I have a standing order in for the Fuji 250 when it ships. I did try the V-mount 250 SA, and it performed pretty well on the GFX, but I didn't like the ergonomics.

Jim



Those are excellent choices for the GFX. I also have the Zeiss 135 f/2 APO (I have the Milvus version) and it does perform excellently, but for portraits I typically prefer the HC 100 f/2 for the rendering, but that is a matter of taste. The HC 150 f/3.2 would also be a very different sort of lens for rendering than the Zeiss 135 f/2 APO, I would expect. So, I see it as two different style that I might want at different times rather than two competing lenses.

In my case I think I want one set of lenses that will have what I feel is a more classic sort of rendering, but still good enough sharpness. I am still putting that kit together, but lenses I am considering are the Contax 645 45 f/2.8, the Leica R 80 f/1.4, and the Minolta MD 135 f/2, as well as the HC 100 f/2 and the HC 150 f/3.2.

I also plan a set of lenses with a more modern highly corrected look. Those include the Leica M 50 f/2 APO, the Leica M 90 f/2 APO, and the Zeiss 135 f/2 APO. I actually have all of these lenses, but haven't tested the Leica M lenses yet as I am still waiting for an adapter. Other seem to find that these two lenses work alright for portraits at least.

The Leica R 280 f/4 is a beautiful lens, and I have always thought that is among the best lenses ever made. It will be interesting how the Fuji 250 does in comparison, but I will be surprised in this case if the Fuji lens is actually better. Of course if you want AF, the Fuji will be your only option.



Sep 25, 2017 at 04:51 PM
Bubble
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.2 #20 · p.2 #20 · GFX users


my reason is simple one. Never try medium format before. Give it a try now and so far, i love it.


Sep 25, 2017 at 05:44 PM
1      
2
       3       end






FM Forums | Fuji Forum | Join Upload & Sell

1      
2
       3       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username     Reset password