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Assorted Garden Macro Stacks
  
 
JohnK007
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Took these with various lenses on the D810.





Freshly-Emerged Western Tiger Swallowtail (Exif is wrong, stack taken with Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 Apo Macro)

  NIKON D810    0.0 mm f/0.0 lens    135mm    f/2.8    1/160s    64 ISO    -2.0 EV  







Grashopper (Unk sp.)

  NIKON D810    Zeiss Apo Sonnar T* 2/135 ZF.2 lens    135mm    f/4.0    1/200s    64 ISO    -2.0 EV  







Green Lynx (taken with AI-S 50mm, reversed)

  NIKON D810    0.0 mm f/0.0 lens    50mm    f/1.2    1/25s    64 ISO    -2.0 EV  







Unk Flower, single image @ f/2

  NIKON D810    Zeiss Apo Sonnar T* 2/135 ZF.2 lens    135mm    f/2.0    1/100s    80 ISO    -2.0 EV  







Katydid Nymph (Stack taken with Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 Apo Macro)







Arizona Mantid ♂ (Stack taken with Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 Apo Macro)







Arizona Mantid ♀ (Stack taken with Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 Apo Macro)




Sep 21, 2017 at 04:39 PM
douter
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Nice work John!
Douglas



Sep 21, 2017 at 05:09 PM
JohnK007
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Thanks Douglas.


Sep 21, 2017 at 07:16 PM
e6filmuser
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


John,

A very crisp and clean set. Love the colours on the katydid.

Harold



Sep 22, 2017 at 06:29 AM
JohnK007
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


e6filmuser wrote:
John,

A very crisp and clean set. Love the colours on the katydid.

Harold



Thank you good sir



Sep 22, 2017 at 07:02 PM
GeorgeR
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Love it! I am just now looking in to macro now that I am on sabbatical from my sports photography gigs. I need a new area to challenge me so I am on a mission to learn. Thanks


Sep 23, 2017 at 02:41 AM
JohnK007
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


GeorgeR wrote:
Love it! I am just now looking in to macro now that I am on sabbatical from my sports photography gigs. I need a new area to challenge me so I am on a mission to learn. Thanks


I hope you stick with it.

Macro is great fun ... and so convenient.

No need to travel anywhere ... there are an unimaginable amount of interesting subjects all around you, from your garden to a dollar bill in your pocket



Sep 23, 2017 at 06:20 PM
Pavel
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


JohnK007 wrote:
I hope you stick with it.

Macro is great fun ... and so convenient.

No need to travel anywhere ... there are an unimaginable amount of interesting subjects all around you, from your garden to a dollar bill in your pocket


I thought the equipment needed ensured that there was never a dollar bill IN one's pocket?



Sep 24, 2017 at 12:37 PM
JohnK007
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Pavel wrote:
I thought the equipment needed ensured that there was never a dollar bill IN one's pocket?


Ha ha ha, very good

Actually, setting yourself up with decent macro gear (though it does cost some money) isn't anywhere near as expensive as bird photography.

The best 100mm macro lenses are about $900 ($2,000 if you want to buy some exotics), while reversing wide lenses (or getting lenses like the Laowa) can be done with $75 to $350.

By contrast, the cheapest bird lenses are about $2,000-$5,000 ... and a new 600mm bird lens will set you back $12K



Sep 24, 2017 at 03:27 PM
Pavel
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


JohnK007 wrote:
Ha ha ha, very good

Actually, setting yourself up with decent macro gear (though it does cost some money) isn't anywhere near as expensive as bird photography.

The best 100mm macro lenses are about $900 ($2,000 if you want to buy some exotics), while reversing wide lenses (or getting lenses like the Laowa) can be done with $75 to $350.

By contrast, the cheapest bird lenses are about $2,000-$5,000 ... and a new 600mm bird lens will set you back $12K


I'm ok on the Lens front. I've got the Olympus 60 f 2.8 macro, the Panasonic 30 f 2.8, the NIkon 60 and 105 VR micro. I am low on some other aspects like flashes and strobes and I want to set up a little home studio for flowers and small items. The focus stacking is an area of intrigue that has sort of pushed me over the edge. It's the skills I'm really low on!



Sep 24, 2017 at 04:23 PM
 

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mawyatt
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Pavel wrote:
I'm ok on the Lens front. I've got the Olympus 60 f 2.8 macro, the Panasonic 30 f 2.8, the NIkon 60 and 105 VR micro. I am low on some other aspects like flashes and strobes and I want to set up a little home studio for flowers and small items. The focus stacking is an area of intrigue that has sort of pushed me over the edge. It's the skills I'm really low on!


Hi Pavel,

A small studio setup for macro can be easy to start, and focus stacking is a nice extension for macro work. Caution though, do not visit the Photomacrography site, it's addictive!! I know I'm a junkie!!

A sturdy tripod, good camera & macro lens where you can use the focus ring for stacking is a good starting point (you are already there). If you venture into smaller subjects then you need to move the camera/lens or subject as mentioned by others. This usually requires a manual rail the camera mount to, many are available. If you want to automate the focus stacking procedure then Stackshot, Wemacro and MJKZZ systems are popular.

Many folks like to use continuous light or speed lights for illumination, but I prefer studio strobes since you don't need to worry about batteries, and they are more powerful. With either speed light or strobes the short flash burst helps with "freezing" vibration also.

I've done a considerable amount of investigation into low cost studio strobes (even had a few explode due to the abuse of stacking). Ones that have the Bowens mount are a good choice, since light modifiers are readily available and cheap. If you don't want/need HSS and iTTL capability the Adorama Flashpoint Studio 300 AC are nice and only cost $120 ( I have these ). They have a built in radio trigger (R2) receiver and this works with the camera specific hot shoe R2 transmitter ($50) for triggering and output power control.

Small light tents from eBay work great as diffusers for the small objects like you mention. You should be able to setup a small studio for macro work with a tent, couple strobes/speedlights (or continuous lights) for starters since you have the camera and requisite macro lenses.

Best,

Mike




Sep 24, 2017 at 06:06 PM
Pavel
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


mawyatt wrote:
Hi Pavel,

A small studio setup for macro can be easy to start, and focus stacking is a nice extension for macro work. Caution though, do not visit the Photomacrography site, it's addictive!! I know I'm a junkie!!

A sturdy tripod, good camera & macro lens where you can use the focus ring for stacking is a good starting point (you are already there). If you venture into smaller subjects then you need to move the camera/lens or subject as mentioned by others. This usually requires a manual rail the camera mount to, many are available. If you want to automate the
...Show more

Oh ... great. NOW you tell me not to visit the macro-photography sites I've been to.

That is good infromation about the strobes. I've only got one Nikon 600. This looks like a proper "project".



Sep 24, 2017 at 06:20 PM
JohnK007
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Pavel wrote:
I'm ok on the Lens front. I've got the Olympus 60 f 2.8 macro, the Panasonic 30 f 2.8, the NIkon 60 and 105 VR micro. I am low on some other aspects like flashes and strobes and I want to set up a little home studio for flowers and small items. The focus stacking is an area of intrigue that has sort of pushed me over the edge. It's the skills I'm really low on!


I have (and know of a few) folks who aren't using strobes or flashes at all, but are attempting even, continuous LED lighting.
Can's Hornet was taken with such LED lighting.

If you experiment with your diffusers, and adjust everything to your liking, I find this more favorable than utilizing flashes because you're able to make all adjustments "as is" rather than wait for the environmental change of intruding light at the shutter actuation.

Aside from the link to Can's gorgeous headshot of a wasp, using LED, here is such a studio shot I took of a live subject, using Jansjö LEDs as well:



My image is not as high-mag as Can's image [Can uses microscope objectives, and is probably at ~8 or 9x (though Can cites 3x, that is simply not likely).]

The shot I took is at 3.9x and covered approximately 9mm.

A wasp's head is maybe 4mm so I think Can's shot is considerably higher-magnification than mine.

Still, regardless of the magnification, LED lights, properly-diffused, produce continuous and very even light and are more controllable than flash IMO.



Sep 24, 2017 at 06:44 PM
mawyatt
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Pavel wrote:
Oh ... great. NOW you tell me not to visit the macro-photography sites I've been to.

That is good infromation about the strobes. I've only got one Nikon 600. This looks like a proper "project".


Well your already hooked

Here's a couple more sites on lenses for macro use to feed your addiction

http://coinimaging.com

https://www.closeuphotography.com/

And here's link to an amazingly good $18 4X microscope objective with a colored pencil and peacock feathers (like Can's) images. I have one and must say it's really good indeed! Be careful though, there are lots of similar lenses on eBay and places that aren't the same lens, looks can and will deceive. Get only the AmScope version Robert mentions.

https://www.closeuphotography.com/seventeen-dollar-plan-4x-objective/



Sep 24, 2017 at 06:58 PM
JohnK007
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Nice info.

Coin imaging is a great resource.

However, a lot of their judgments are based on corner-to-corner sharpness (necessary for coins/flat-field work), which is not really necessary for arthropod work ... unless the frame is being filled with the subject.

Even still, lens curvature sometimes means their really is corner-to-corner sharpness as you focus-in, which gets alleviated by stacking.



Sep 24, 2017 at 07:12 PM
mawyatt
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Actually I think Can's image is near 3X (3.125 or 3.375). He's using a Mitutoyo 5X with probably a tube lens, Raynox 250 (125mm) or Zeiss 135mm or Vivitar 135mm. Most folks don't push these Mitty's above their design point, only below.

Continuous light isn't always practical with the heavenly diffused requirements I and others have, it requires too much light and things just get too hot.

Vibration is where the flash really helps though, the short light burst "freezes" the vibration. The camera Mirror Up is a major source of perturbation, then even the front shutter curtain. Other sources of unwanted vibration are people walking, doors closing, TV sound, AC, pool pump, cars even airplanes. I've tried continuous lighting and produced better results with strobes, which is what I use mostly now.

I do have the Ikea LED gooseneck lights which I use for alignment, but not actually image captures. These are certainly good for places where you can use continuous lighting, as Can has demonstrated.

Best,

Mike



Sep 24, 2017 at 07:24 PM
mawyatt
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


Agree Mark Goodman has done a great job of giving us a site to compare lenses that are useful for macro and micro work.

Corner sharpness, CA and center sharpness are important to me with the chips I normally shoot. So I'm always looking for improvements in these areas at different magnifications.

The Mitutoyo 5X, 10X & 20X are probably the standard for overall IQ at those magnifications, the 2X isn't very good though. These require a 200mm tube lens to function at their optical design point, but folks, myself included, have used them with certain 125 & 135mm tube lenses successfully near 3X (as Can has done). Unfortunately Mark doesn't show any of these lenses on his site just yet, maybe sometime soon we'll see these lens there. He does have some other microscope objectives though, so you can get an idea of how they behave.

Some special lenses really shine too, the Printing Nikon 105mm F2.8A (around 1X) or the Schneider Macro- Varon for example. The Canon 35mm F2.8 Macro Bellows is quite good also.

So lots of good useful information from Mark's site!!

Best,

Mike



Sep 24, 2017 at 07:47 PM
JohnK007
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p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


mawyatt wrote:
Actually I think Can's image is near 3X (3.125 or 3.375). He's using a Mitutoyo 5X with probably a tube lens, Raynox 250 (125mm) or Zeiss 135mm or Vivitar 135mm. Most folks don't push these Mitty's above their design point, only below.


From Can's photos of his setup, it seems he uses both a bellows and a tube lens.

Since very high-mag is your specialty, wouldn't extending the bellows back increase magnification? (It does on reversed lenses, which is my only experience.)



mawyatt wrote:
Continuous light isn't always practical with the heavenly diffused requirements I and others have, it requires too much light and things just get too hot.

Vibration is where the flash really helps though, the short light burst "freezes" the vibration. The camera Mirror Up is a major source of perturbation, then even the front shutter curtain. Other sources of unwanted vibration are people walking, doors closing, TV sound, AC, pool pump, cars even airplanes. I've tried continuous lighting and produced better results with strobes, which is what I use mostly now.


Very interesting, and I am sure very true for your extreme magnification purposes.

However, Pavel indicated on his other post that he only wanted to photography 'small antique bottles and such (for a neighbor who may start selling them) and studio type flower arrangements.'

There is simply not going to be as much extreme lighting needed for such low magnification work, which will likely be 1:4 to 1:1. Not that strobes/flashes can't be used to good effect, but either can be placed farther-back and are thus more easily-diffused than the kind of lighting required for super-close extreme mag shots. I am sure either way could be very effective.



mawyatt wrote:
I do have the Ikea LED gooseneck lights which I use for alignment, but not actually image captures. These are certainly good for places where you can use continuous lighting, as Can has demonstrated.

Best,

Mike


Yes.



Sep 24, 2017 at 08:02 PM
mawyatt
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p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


With the Mitutoyo that Can is using (5X inf corrected) it's designed for a 200mm tube lens. The distance from the Mitty to the tube lens isn't critical (this is why better microscope use them, they can place items in the optical path without any negative effects). However the effective distance from the tube lens to the sensor needs to be at the focal length of the tube lens. Looks as if he's using the Raynox magnifying lens that many of us have been using for some time, thus my question to him about the Raynox 250 (8 diopter or 125mm FL). This gives a overall magnification of 5X(125/200) to 3.125X. The Mitty allows this away from design center use and produces very nice results as Can has shown, however it does vignette on full frame, so best to use APC format.

You can also use a proper 200mm lens, or the Raynox 150 (4.8 diopter or 208.3mm). The 150 needs to be placed about 208mm from the sensor, whereas the proper 200mm lens (like the old Nikon 200mm F4 "Q") needs to be focused at infinity (this is where the inf. corrected comes from). You can also use "some" 135mm lenses like the old Vivitar (Komine only) or Carl Zeiss 135 f3.5, these work well but vignette also and produce 5X(135/200) or 3.375X magnification. I have and use all these lenses with the Mitty 5, 10 and 20X. I've tried the Rokinon 135mm f2 which is stunningly sharp, but it's no good as a tube lens. Lots of speculation amongst the experts about what will make a good or not good tube lens, but no one really knows for sure. Best to just try and see. Lou over at Photomacrography has tried the new Sigma Art 135 as a tube lens and apparently it works OK.

The Mitty's don't like to be pulled down to 100mm, they may vignette too much and the IQ may suffer, but I haven't tried so don't actually know. Others have pulled them 150, 160 and 180mm with varying results also.

Agree for Pavel intended use, continuous lighting should be fine. But if he succumbs to the "devil's in the details" dark side, he'll probably want to move to some sort of flash.
Best,

Mike



Sep 24, 2017 at 08:33 PM
JohnK007
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p.1 #20 · p.1 #20 · Assorted Garden Macro Stacks


mawyatt wrote:
With the Mitutoyo that Can is using (5X inf corrected) it's designed for a 200mm tube lens. The distance from the Mitty to the tube lens isn't critical (this is why better microscope use them, they can place items in the optical path without any negative effects). However the effective distance from the tube lens to the sensor needs to be at the focal length of the tube lens. Looks as if he's using the Raynox magnifying lens that many of us have been using for some time, thus my question to him about the Raynox 250 (8 diopter or
...Show more

Interesting info, thanks.

I believe he uses FF (Canon 6D).



mawyatt wrote:
You can also use a proper 200mm lens, or the Raynox 150 (4.8 diopter or 208.3mm). The 150 needs to be placed about 208mm from the sensor, whereas the proper 200mm lens (like the old Nikon 200mm F4 "Q") needs to be focused at infinity (this is where the inf. corrected comes from). You can also use "some" 135mm lenses like the old Vivitar (Komine only) or Carl Zeiss 135 f3.5, these work well but vignette also and produce 5X(135/200) or 3.375X magnification. I have and use all these lenses with the Mitty 5, 10 and 20X. I've tried the
...Show more

Again, interesting, thank you.

I have seen other macro shooters not use a tube lens at all and simply adapt a microscope objective to a bellows and then into the camera.

What are the advantages/disadvantages of this?



mawyatt wrote:
The Mitty's don't like to be pulled down to 100mm, they may vignette too much and the IQ may suffer, but I haven't tried so don't actually know. Others have pulled them 150, 160 and 180mm with varying results also.


By 'pulled down' are you referring to the length of the bellows?



mawyatt wrote:
Agree for Pavel intended use, continuous lighting should be fine. But if he succumbs to the "devil's in the details" dark side, he'll probably want to move to some sort of flash.
Best,
Mike


Yes, we're talking two different subjects: extreme, high-mag macro versus what Pavel was inquiring about: standard macro lengths. Even with 3-5x magnification continuous LED light is fine. For your purposes, your points are well-taken ... and wouldn't have even have been aware of them, so I appreciate your input.

I am building "an extreme" setup, though I don't know how much I will use it. Right now, I just have the breadboard, bellows, and reversed lenses and can get up to maybe 10x, though the quality is not as good as what I've seen from those using microscope objectives.



Sep 25, 2017 at 12:14 AM
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