Home · Register · Software · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username  

FM Forum Rules
Landscape Posting Guidelines
  

FM Forums | Landscape Photographer | Join Upload & Sell

  

Recommended Filters
  
 
goobers
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Recommended Filters


Hi all. I plan on getting back into landscape photography in the coming months and will be shooting with a Nikon D600 + Nikon 18-35mm. The lens can take screw on 77mm filters and I will be shooting primarily in WA state. In the past I've simply used a circular polarizer with my wide angle lenses, but I'm definitely willing to learn and practice with something new. Neutral density filters are mentioned quite frequently, but I've never used them before.

What are everyone's recommendations? ND filter sets? Graduated ND filter? No filter?

TIA



Sep 15, 2017 at 04:34 AM
01Ryan10
Online
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Recommended Filters


Do not get screw on GNDs. Your compositions will be limited by them.

I have Lee Foundation system with Big Stopper and some GNDs. A very small blue cast that can easily be adjusted in post.



Sep 15, 2017 at 05:04 AM
harshaj1
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Recommended Filters


I always carry 10, 5 and 3 stop ND filters and a polarizer. No GND
Harsha



Sep 15, 2017 at 10:22 AM
morris
Offline
• • • • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Recommended Filters


Grad ND filters used to be a go to for me when there was a large dynamic range. I've stopped using them preferring to take two or more exposures and blend in post. To slow the shutter for waterfalls I used my CPL and add a 2 stop ND when necessary. Color filters and also done in post

Morris



Sep 15, 2017 at 02:07 PM
Dave Dillemuth
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Recommended Filters


I would suggest you look at either the Singh Ray or Lee systems. Depending on what sort of subject matter you shoot you can outfit with the right filters. I primarily shoot mountain landscapes and find a .75 GND and a 6 stop ND filter are my two go-to filters. Occasionally, I also use a polarizer to eliminate reflections on water/foliage.


Sep 15, 2017 at 03:09 PM
JLRII
Offline

Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Recommended Filters


A CPL and a 6 stop ND are my goto filters, you can get pretty far with just those two. I leave the CPL mounted and stack the ND as needed. I also own a 9 stop ND that hasn't seen much use yet - but if you want to shoot long exposures in daylight, such a filter would come in handy. My main concern would be vignetting when stacking filters - on an ultra wide, you'll likely want to use slim filters if you are interested in stacking (another potential solution could be larger diameter filters on a step-up ring, although you'd lose the ability to mount a lens hood).

Personally, I'm not a fan of using square filters, they take up too much space for my preferences and I consider grad NDs to be a bit of a double-edged sword, they aren't ideal for all compositions. In the event that I am dynamic range limited, usually I'd rather bracket and blend in post.



Sep 15, 2017 at 03:09 PM
jdc562
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Recommended Filters


IMO Polarizers are badly over-used by people who don't understand how they work. They only work for certain sun conditions and angles of light; for the rest of the time they are just blocking light at best, and often introducing unwanted artifacts. For screw-on CPLs on wide angle lenses, there is the risk of vignetting if you don't have the right set-up. On wide-angle settings, polarizers also often produce big, uneven, dark, ugly, blotches in blue skies. For skies, you can often get the wanted contrast effects without CPLs by adjusting exposure settings combined with post-processing; this avoids the ugly side-effects.

However, as already pointed out by Dave D, CPLs can be useful for taking the glare off leaves and water surfaces. Before mounting my CPLs, I always view the effects on the scene by hand-holding the CPL, which I rotate to see if the resulting benefits warrant the use. If the effects meet my needs, I mount the CPL; otherwise, they are a nuisance.

For ND filters, a big advantage of the square filters is being able to adjust the position of the transition area of the grad filters. But again, if you have the dynamic range in your image, you can get the needed results in processing without the limitations of fitting a non-linear composition into a linear grad.



Sep 15, 2017 at 07:08 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



JohnBrew
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Recommended Filters


Lots of good advice here. I use 10, 6 & 3 stop ND's plus CPL. When I take two or three lenses for travel, naturally none of them use the same filter size - that would be too easy, this ends up being one heck of a lot of filters and boxes (I haven't found a pouch holder for filters I trust not to scratch the glass). I recently tried a square filter setup so as to cut down on the amount of filters. I tried the NISI V5 system which while it worked well was cumbersome and gripped the filters so tightly it was almost impossible to position the ND grad, plus the entire setup rotated on the lens so as to make it very hard to set anything from behind the camera (YMMV). I returned the set but after I did I found out about the V5 Pro holder which doesn't grip the filter so tightly so maybe I'll give it another go sometime.
I also looked at the Formatt square system but there are too just many small parts to lose. The NISI are gasketed which does a great job of sealing off stray light.
One other thing - with the screw-on filters I can still use my lens hoods.
Hope this helps.



Sep 15, 2017 at 07:30 PM
goobers
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Recommended Filters


Thanks for the input everybody! I'm definitely intrigued with the LEE system and have been doing some research on it. I've also read through some other websites and some mention variable ND filters, but also acknowledging vignetting problems.

Nobody here has mentioned variables and was wondering if it's something I should even consider.

thanks again!



Sep 16, 2017 at 05:38 AM
jdc562
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Recommended Filters


The variable ND filters are actually two polarizer filters stacked. One may be linear instead of circular. Rotating one of them varies the amount of blocked light. Consequently, this basically doubles the problems already posted here with polarizers, including uglifying effects on blue skies: instead of getting just one ugly dark blob, the variable ND produces multiple ugly dark blobs. There are many reviews online. You will get more complete information by Googling "how do variable ND filters work?"


Sep 16, 2017 at 05:26 PM
goobers
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Recommended Filters


jdc562 wrote:
The variable ND filters are actually two polarizer filters stacked. One may be linear instead of circular. Rotating one of them varies the amount of blocked light. Consequently, this basically doubles the problems already posted here with polarizers, including uglifying effects on blue skies: instead of getting just one ugly dark blob, the variable ND produces multiple ugly dark blobs. There are many reviews online. You will get more complete information by Googling "how do variable ND filters work?"


I read about the problems after I posted this message last night, but thank you for confirming the negative aspects of the variables.



Sep 16, 2017 at 08:17 PM
goobers
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Recommended Filters


Okay - I think I'm leaning towards a CPL and a couple ND filters to go along with it to practice. I suspect that I'll upgrade to a LEE system in the future, but for the time being I want to travel a little lighter while I practice.

There's a handful of different CPLs out there including digital high def, MRC/multi coating: If i'm going to be stacking ND filters on top of the CPL, can I go with a regular CPL without all these other options?

Similarly, ND filters have single coating and multi coating. I generally buy multi coating when I buy other filters, but wanted to get the recommendation from the pros here.



Sep 19, 2017 at 04:17 AM
TooManyShots
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Recommended Filters


ND filters allow you to smooth out water and capture moving clouds. Pretty much blurring out all things that move. If the exposure timing is long enough, you can even make people disappear. ND filters are to reduce your light and allowing you to use a more slower, very slow shutter speed. 6 stops ND filter is useful and generally for shooting during sunset and sunrise. 10 stops or more ND filter is for shooting during the day light. CPL filter is useful to reduce glares and darkened water or sky or anywhere you need to reduce surface reflection.

Is just me but I think you should start out with screw on filters because they are generally cheaper. And you don't know if you need or would want to use square filter system until you become good at using them in where and how. FYI, an entire square filter system can cost as much as a lens!!!! $300 to $500+.

For ND filters, try the Haida pro brand. They are 40% cheaper than BW and just as good. You may have to order them through ebay and from oversea. I just got my Haida pro slim 6 stops ND filter few days ago. It took 2 weeks to get here from China. Is nice. Is light. Is thin. Is very easy to clean. No color cast at all. You should stick to multi coated CPL for the fact that you are going to stack it with your ND filter.

I think a 6 and 10 stop ND filters should do well in most situation. You can stack it with a CPL to give you an additional 1 stop+.



Sep 22, 2017 at 02:38 PM







FM Forums | Landscape Photographer | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username     Reset password