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Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)
  
 
AlexDROP
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


Hi FMers,
As a disclaimer first, it is one more gear switching thread. And I need your help and some experience to share with me especially if I tend following your steps. Yes, it is a long story. And I’m not a native English speaker so I beg for pardon.
It is not a thread to blame one brand over another. It is more about possibilities and paths that these brands open to us, photographers. And I’m merely collecting pros and cons to make my own decision. And your sensible contribution and arguments are very welcome. So it begins.

I've been asking myself a question about my shooting style, inspiration and hence my photo kit since launch of Canon 6D2. It is a nice "entry level FF camera" but I don't think it is a worth upgrade from my 6D considering lack of IQ benefits for 2k$ price tag. Moreover I'd like to get better IQ with a new upgrade if staying on Canon path. So I started digging photo gear deals and comparisons that resulted in 3 upgrading paths – staying in-home with Canon or jumping ship to Nikon or Fuji. And I need your advice and some clarification about Fuji gear.

Firstly I think I should describe my photo preferences and shooting style to specify the issue. You will find examples of my shooting later after the text.
I'm a hobbyist and a Canon shooter for 15 years yet I'm not brand loyal like many fanboys and my style keeps me open-minded in terms of photo gear as a piece of tool.

• I DON'T shoot sports, action, BIF, weddings, street, low light, video.
• I DO shoot landscapes, cityscapes, architecture, blue hours, interiors, close-ups, long exposures, travel and wish to shoot astro.
• I RAREly shoot reportage, wildlife, portraits.
• Speaking of ISO values I prefer to shoot at lowest possible ISO but sometimes I use settings up to 800 for landscapes e.g. to freeze running clouds.
• I use my photo gear to capture images mostly during my trips to European countries and on vacation. So weight of my kit is a factor to consider.
• I try to get the most when capturing a shot so I shoot stopped down to f/8-f/11 and use lens hoods, screw-in filters (circ-PL and ND), MLU with 2sec. delay and a tripod (when needed of course).
• I shoot RAW and post process files in PS. I am skilled in bracketing and blending, digital gradient filters, retouching and other digital manipulations but I like to get a natural looking image as a final result. I think I can call myself a pixelpeeper in terms of getting the best IQ with available photo gear.

In 2013 I sold my previous Canon FF set-up and purchased Fuji X-E2 with a kit zoom 18-55. Six moths later I sold Fuji and went back to Canon with 6D. Nikon D750 was not available yet, D600 had oil spots issue. Now I own 6D, 16-35/4 L, Sigma 35A and Zeiss 100 Makro-Planar and I'm not invested in Canon flashes. A friend of mine loans 24-105/4 L when I need it. So speaking of Fuji upgrade path I have some experience and Fuji X-line catches my attention once again.

What I liked about X-E2 kit are lightweight factor, EVF exp./WB simulation, AF precision in good/normal light, jpeg colors. I didn't like lack of AF-ON back button function, very poor EVF and AF behavior in dim light (for nightscaping), poor worm-like conversion in ACR (my primary workflow), and poor battery life.
I understand that my intended usage of X-trans cameras are not common for the majority of X-community and that X-cameras do their best in other genres like street, casual, portraiture, etc.

Now I look for 2 bodies / 3 lenses set-up as my travel kit, namely X-T20 or X-E3 (with arca-swiss compatible handgrips) and 10-24, 55-200 and 18-55 (or 35 mm prime) lenses and a carbon fiber tripod that only weights 1,3 kg. Total weight of such set-up is about 3,7 kg. I can't consider 8-16, 16-55 and 50-140 options due to extra weight and/or filter thread lacking.
I'm aware that some of X-E2 issues I described can't be addressed to Fuji engineers but I want to get confirmation that the rest are solved. Could you please share your approaches mitigating following points?

1. AF-ON back button function can be assigned to AE/AF-L buttons, can't it? I like splitted shutter release and AF-ON functions for a shutter button. I need confirmation please.
2. EVF: how much is it good now in X-T20 camera for framing nightscapes considering moon lit and dimmer scenes? With X-E2 I often wasn't able even to see framing borders and had to frame a scene in full blind when doing nightscapes (maybe it is wrong EVF settings, I’m not sure). With 6D and Sigma 35A I'm fine even with rare street lights on the horizon or quarter moon.
3. Is it possible to acquire AF in dim light, moonlight conditions? MF scale helps a lot but it's not always appropriate/precise. Any other tips?
4. Could you name a raw converter that does Fuji raws demosaicing in comparable way with Canon/Nikon raws on per-pixel level? I tried demo Iridient DNG plug-in and it brings great acuity to Fuji raws along with some speckled artefacts and patterned/weird noise in smooth gradients. Is there any better converter for landscape-like files?
5. Speaking of long exposure shooting how would you rate Fuji X-trans sensor capabilities? Looks like Nikon is superior in this regard. And specific techniques to mitigate LE noise of X-sensor?
6. Dynamic range of X-trans sensors looks fine to me, so does to you? Does someone of landscapers find he/she is limited with Fuji raws in terms of DR and overall file malleability?

Two other paths I'm considering are:
a) Nikon D750 + D810/750 and 16-35/4 VR + 70-200/4 VR or AF-P 70-300 VR (total weight is about 4,5 kg);
b) Canon 6D + 5D4 and 16-35/4 L + 70-300 IS II (total weight is about 4,4 kg).
I find that having 2 cameras will let me take more captures cuz I often don't like to change lenses for one or two scenes so I miss them and it is a pity. Canikon 16-35 + 70-300 set-up will cover all my needs in focal lengths. Fuji needs 3 lenses for that cuz 24-55 gap (35-85 eqv.) is too huge to frame a scene by foot.
Canon path is good for its great ergonomics, less money spending cuz I currently own 1 Canon body and 1 lens yet new 5D4 is very pricy. And Canon system is very familiar to me. Sadly in my country Canon service is not a real factor to consider.
Nikon set-up is great for DR and LE noise levels, body price tags and lightweight primes selection I might consider later.

Could you please share your view and thoughts on my dilemma and contribute to pros & cons section if I missed something? Thanks in advance, Alex.


Edited on Sep 14, 2017 at 07:25 PM · View previous versions



Sep 14, 2017 at 07:24 PM
AlexDROP
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


#1. St. Michael's Wing of Hofburg Palace, Vienna, Austria / Canon EOS 6D, EF16-35mm f/4L IS USM, ƒ/8.0, 16.0 mm, 10s, ISO 100



_MG_0450_web - Sleeping beauty of old Vienna by Alex DROP, on Flickr


#2. Sheikh Zayed Mosque, Abu Dhabi, UAE



_MG_9092_web - Backlit Sheikh Zayed Mosque scape by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#3. The Széchenyi Chain Bridge, Budapest, Hungary



_MG_8132_web - The Széchenyi Chain Bridge at night by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#4. Schönbrunn Palace Garden, Vienna, Austria



_MG_0496_web - Gloriette at sunrise by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#5. Dubai skyline, UAE



_MG_8749_web - Where the day meets the night by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#6. Brugge/Bruges, Belgium



IMG_0950_RAW - A view of Jan Van Eyckplein by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#7. Glencoe, Scotland



_MG_0947_web - A view of Loch Achtriochtan by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#8. Khao Lak, Thailand



_MG_5711_web - A long exposure seascape in Khao Lak by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#9. Khao Lak, Thailand



_MG_1718_web - A Moonlight scape by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#10. Khao Lak, Thailand



_MG_5753_web - Colorful sunset in Khao Lak, Thailand by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#11. Khao Lak, Thailand



_MG_6126_web - Khao Lak sunset by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#12. Vienna Central Cemetery, Austria



IMG_7852_web - What do trees whisper about? by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#13. A Hibiscus flower



_MG_2554_web - A Hibiscus flower by Alex DROP, on Flickr



#14. A frog



_MG_2716_web - A frog 3 by Alex DROP, on Flickr



Sep 14, 2017 at 07:24 PM
leighton w
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


AlexDROP wrote:
Hi FMers,
As a disclaimer first, it is one more gear switching thread. And I need your help and some experience to share with me especially if I tend following your steps. Yes, it is a long story. And I’m not a native English speaker so I beg for pardon.
It is not a thread to blame one brand over another. It is more about possibilities and paths that these brands open to us, photographers. And I’m merely collecting pros and cons to make my own decision. And your sensible contribution and arguments are very welcome. So it begins.

I've been asking myself
...Show more

I would suggest you browse the ton of information in this forum for awhile, say for a week. You'll soon discover all that you need to know. At the end of that week, if you still need some answers, you'll have a better idea of the route you want to take. BTW...your English is just fine.



Sep 14, 2017 at 08:15 PM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


Given the number of questions you have, I'll agree with the previous poster that some general exploration of this forum may help you.

I'll also give some general thoughts on the "switching" to the Fujifilm system for what I take to be your types of photography.

1. Rather than "switching" (e.g. — giving up one system and moving wholesale to another) I urge new adopters to try out the Fujifilm system before getting rid of the old gear. Also consider, at least for a while, using the Fujifilm gear to augment rather than replace your existing system. (In the end, that is how I decided to use my Fujifilm gear.)

2. When comparing to full frame systems, there are things that they can do that a smaller sensor system cannot do or cannot do as well. You'll need to decide how important these things are to your photography, or at least to the portions of your work that you'll do with the cropped sensor system.

3. That being said, the current 24MP Fujifilm systems produce excellent image quality, and prints in the 20" x 30" range and larger are a realistic target output.

4. Much of your experience is based on the older XE1 system, which I also started with. Its pluses and minuses are well known, and many of the minuses (slow AF, some hunting in low light, fewer controls, etc) have been rectified in the newer cameras. My XPro2 AFs much faster and with a great deal of accuracy. (Though in certain cases a DSLR will still be better when it comes to AF.)

5. I'm surprised that you want to carry so many bodies for travel photography, but each to his own. My travel setup is very small and light — one of the major advantages of the Fujifilm system — and I can carry the entire thing in a small messenger bag that fits under airline seats. It consists of Xpro2, 14mm, 23mm, and 35mm primes. I sometimes augment this with the 50-140mm zoom, though I used to use the 55-200mm lens.

6. Many of the Fujifilm lenses are really excellent. Check to make sure that these cover the focal lengths and other features that you require. While Fujifilm's lens offerings are increasingly extensive, there are a few gaps that might affect certain users. (For example, I love the 50-140mm f/2.8, but I'd be happy if there were a smaller and lighter f/4 version — equivalent to the Canon 70-200mm f/4 lenses.)

7. If you must use multiple bodies, consider complementary rather than identical bodies. For example, you might combine a XT2 (great for use with zooms) and the XPro2 (great for street photography with primes). Or you might augment one of the above with a smaller and lighter body such as the upcoming XE3 or the X100f.

Dan



Sep 15, 2017 at 02:51 PM
Alanu
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


Alex,

I urge you to purchase any of the 24mp Fuji bodies and just have fun and experiment.

I shoot Canon and Fuji and I've somehow managed to figure out where and when to use it.

The 16-35 f/4IS is truly a hard lens to beat when it comes to cityscape/landscape. Even though the 6D doesn't have the best dynamic range you can still manage great files with that full frame.

The Fuji 10-24mm f/4 is a great lens in the Fuji world but I just cant wait to test out the newer UWA from them.

Alex don't test the 5dmk4.......for a Canon guy you'd be extremely impressed. The image quality on your 16-35 f/4IS will improve a lot when you use that same lens on the 5dmk4. In fact every lens will seem to jump up a notch in IQ!!!!!!

Figure out the focal lengths you require in the Fuji world and just go out and buy a Fuji for fun. That's what I did and I truly love the results I get with that system. I'm using my Fuji as a secondary system that manages to work side by side my Canon (substantially more reliable in low light) on many occasions.

I paid roughly $5000 (incl tax) Canadian for my 5dmk4. What I will suggest to you is take baby steps and give Fuji a good test run. You can buy a nice simple kit for the price of buying a Canon 5dmk4. If Fuji provided me the performance I need/demand I would sell all my Canon gear and probably would have had 2 x X-t2 with battery booster and all of their lens offerings. At this moment Fuji cannot replace my Canon gear's performance so this is why I'm incredibly happy in having my current Secondary system / Fuji kit I own.

Let your gut feel and eyes decide on Fuji gear. I have a feeling you'll appreciate the image quality. If you want a light travel kit with Fuji you'll be sacrificing some benefits you'd get with a full frame. Or if your like me bring 1 DSLR with UWA and a Fuji kit that covers the focal lengths you need.

If you feel the need to go Nikon your going to appreciate the DR and High ISO performance. Your photography demands on gear isn't as demanding as an events photographer. I think virtually any Camera system with excellent dynamic range will match you very well.

Even a Sony A7Rmk2 would give you more megapixels to play with.

Rent gear if you can and see if it meets your needs. You will never know until you give fuji a hard test drive



Sep 15, 2017 at 04:51 PM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


^^^
Amen.



Sep 15, 2017 at 05:09 PM
doc4x5
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


I moved to Fuji from the Nikon D800E with the X E-1 and now use an X T-2 exclusively. I had Nikon digital cameras beginning with the D70. I kept the D800E for quite a while while selling off the lenses. I still have three PC-E's, 24, 45, 85. The weight advantage is significant, the quality is really close. I just rented a Fuji GFX50S for a weekend and shot over 500 images in familiar places. The image quality difference is clearly visible at 100% on a screen and at 14x16" print size but only if you are looking for differences and stick your nose in the print. At my usual print sizes, 9x13 and 13x20 at "normal" viewing distance, they're too close to be worth the US$8k a starting system would cost. When processing the GFX files, I looked back at a lot of my D800E files and files from a Sony A7RII I had rented and concluded that 24MP is just fine. APS-C is the sweet spot for me for a combination of adequate detail and reasonable lens size. Once you get used to the idea that you're focusing on the sensor instead of a ground glass in an OVF system that is intrinsically imprecise, you'll never go back.

While I have many of the Fuji primes, from the 14 to the 60 macro, I invariably use the three great zooms, 10-24, 16-55, and 50-140. They are all impressively sharp and handle well. The majority of my work is with the 16-55 f/2.8.

I do the same type of work you do, landscape, nature, occasional family and grandchild images. The Fuji works quite well and is a genuine pleasure to use.

Try it out, find a friend with one, rent one if you can do that in Moscow. You might just like it. But I agree, don't toss your old gear until you're sure. If you can't afford the new without unloading the old, maybe you're not quite ready for a change.

Best of luck.

Eric



Sep 15, 2017 at 05:46 PM
Steve Wylie
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


I invariably use the three great zooms, 10-24, 16-55, and 50-140. They are all impressively sharp and handle well.

I agree with this. You could travel the world with an X-Pro2, an X-T2 and these three lenses. They will fit in a small Domke bag that weighs practically nothing. That's my normal location kit. Or in a Think Tank Airport Essentials, with all of the chargers, cleaning supplies, etc., etc., which fits under an airplane seat. This is my normal go-to kit for European concert tours.



Sep 15, 2017 at 07:44 PM
itai195
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


The main issue going with those three zooms is that the weight savings over a DSLR is a bit less. Of course, if the OP is comparing to a D750 + 16-35 + 70-200 f/4, then perhaps the 16-55 could be left out.

Also, another way to fill the 24-85mm gap would be to get a 35/2 rather than a zoom, since it is tiny and light. Wide zoom, long zoom, and normal prime is actually a pretty common landscaper kit.



Sep 16, 2017 at 01:08 AM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


Steve Wylie wrote:
I agree with this. You could travel the world with an X-Pro2, an X-T2 and these three lenses. They will fit in a small Domke bag that weighs practically nothing. That's my normal location kit. Or in a Think Tank Airport Essentials, with all of the chargers, cleaning supplies, etc., etc., which fits under an airplane seat. This is my normal go-to kit for European concert tours.


The only thing I'd say about that is that there is little reason for the XPro2 with those lenses. With zooms, especially large size zooms like those (two of which I use) as your only lenses you would be better of with the EVF of the XT2 for both bodies.

The XPro2 can work well with those lenses, but its particular advantage is when you use it with the optical viewfinder and small primes. So either add a few of those to the kit, or...

Dan



Sep 16, 2017 at 02:02 AM
 

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travelair
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


I've been a Nikon guy for about 40 years, being too lazy/cheap to switch, even when some other systems offered technical advantages. However, modern DSLR Nikons, and their respective AF lenses, are relative pigs compared to the FM2, FE and F3 bodies, and MF lenses, that formed the cornerstone of my Nikon experience. Wanting to lighten my load, I found the Fuji system, first with an X-E1, and now an X-T20, took me back a bit. As a long-time analog shooter, they just feel like a real camera, versus a computer with a lens attached. Something about the best camera is the one you have with you, and I found that I was seldom interested in carrying my D800, and respective optics, for 'fun' shooting. Now, with the lighter kit, I'm shooting more.

However, looking at your posted images, it seems you are willing to put some effort into making memorable images. What is the end game for you...small prints, large prints, or simply digital postings? IMO, better captures on my X-E1 were excellent to 11x14, and I'm hoping the files from my recently acquired X-T20 will let me go to 16x20.

All rambling aside, your first six images suggest that you might need to stay with Canon, and play with their excellent 17mm tilt/shift (plus maybe 24 tilt/shift), before deciding to jump ship.



Sep 16, 2017 at 03:38 AM
doc4x5
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


It's somewhat off the original topic of the post but many people like to use adapted lenses on mirrorless cameras. Be aware that there is currently NO WAY to use a Nikon "E" lens, any of them, on a Fuji mirrorless camera and control the aperture! I've no experience with the excellent Canon lenses or excellent Sony mirrorless cameras so cannot comment on those. The Nikon lenses, and I have the PC-E 24, 45, 85 combo require an electronic communication with the camera. Thus far, and I'm patiently waiting, no adapter company has chosen to make such an adapter. Adapters for Nikon "G" lenses to Fuji are widely available. I cannot wait to be wrong on this issue.
Eric



Sep 16, 2017 at 03:43 PM
Steve Wylie
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


The only thing I'd say about that is that there is little reason for the XPro2 with those lenses. With zooms, especially large size zooms like those (two of which I use) as your only lenses you would be better of with the EVF of the XT2 for both bodies.

The XPro2 can work well with those lenses, but its particular advantage is when you use it with the optical viewfinder and small primes. So either add a few of those to the kit, or...

Dan


Intellectually, I agree with you, Dan. But from the first moment I held an X-Pro2, I knew I "needed" one. So I bought it, and it's my preferred camera for most of my Fuji lenses (I do have five primes). But for a lot of work I do, I need to pare down my kit, so the X-Pro2 and X-T2 come with me, along with these three zooms (in performance photography, I can't always zoom with my feet). So I have no problem mounting either the 10-24 or the 16-55 on the X-Pro2, with the 50-140 on the X-T2. I'm sure I could leave the X-Pro2 at home, and bring my X-T1 along with my X-T2, but then I'd miss the Pro2! For most personal work, I use the X-Pro2 with whichever primes I need for that shoot.



Sep 16, 2017 at 05:33 PM
Pavel
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


AlexDROP wrote:
Hi FMers,
As a disclaimer first, it is one more gear switching thread. And I need your help and some experience to share with me especially if I tend following your steps. Yes, it is a long story. And I’m not a native English speaker so I beg for pardon.
It is not a thread to blame one brand over another. It is more about possibilities and paths that these brands open to us, photographers. And I’m merely collecting pros and cons to make my own decision. And your sensible contribution and arguments are very welcome. So it begins.

I've been asking myself
...Show more


I love Fuji but I have to dissent with the normal "go jump in to the Fuji experience" a lot.

Looking at the quality of your photos, you will find the Fuji sensor adequate, I believe, and near on par with what you have now. But for the weight advantage, which is often an illusion, you will be giving up a LOT of IQ compared to the D810 and especially the D850, likely, and especially in your niche shooting style. The X-T1 is a great sensor, don't get me wrong, especially if you like to shoot jpg's, but it just is not in the same league as the best from Nikon, not by a long shot. For starters the well-fill capacity of a base iso of 200 versus native iso 64 is a serious drag. But the Dynamic range and shadow recovery are also leagues apart. Normally that isn't such a big deal but seeing you (fantastic) photos, I think you would be impacted more than the average person.

On the specifics of the back focus, the latest crop of cameras from Fuji are getting there. One can disable the shutter from any focus and assign it to the back button. That button is a pita as far as size and location, but it is doable. the back button focusing ergonomics is what ruined any thought of upgrading to the X-T2 for me, but I don't work off a tripod and have specific needs (like shooting one handed) and I think that you would find it just fine.

Lastly I think that the ligher weight promise is a bit over-hyped. Sure you can save some weight in the bag, but it's not been a transformative thing for me. I keep the m43 system around for that. this may or may not apply to your set of values, but for me the X-T2 is too small for the larger zooms. You save weight but you wind up with a poorly balanced body/lens system compared to what you are used to. The Fuji strength is in it's primes. Once those long heavy zooms are put on - I feel most of the promise is lost. It sure is for me.

And then there is the fact that Fuji is a system that is "getting there" compared to Canon and Nikon. There are all sorts of odd behaviors. One that randomly comes to mind is "put it in manual focus" and the focus indicator disappears sort of design logic. Then there are the loose focus rings, probably because Fuji just had to cater to those who wanted 1/3 stops and would wail if only 1/2 stops were on the ring.

You are used to an optical viewfinder and you seem to shoot a lot at night. There are fabulous advantages to an electronic viewfinder, but trying to do astro-photography just about drove me insane with that over-bright thing which ruins my night visions. You may want to consider details like that, depending on exactly how you like to work.

Then there is the huge diference in battery life. The Fuji gets somewhere around 400 shots per 68 dollar battery, while the Nikon D850 gets about 1900 on a 55 dollar battery. Important if you shoot in cold weather. In Toronto in winter I got just over 80 shots with my X-pro 1 on a full charge. That was ok because by then my brains were frozen, but it might be worth factoring in.

Now this probably sounds kind of sour about Fuji, but there are simply the "look before you cross the road" points. In fact between Olympus, Fuji and Nikon, it's fuji that has my heart. But as with life a beautiful, exotic, temperamental and tempestuous woman, it's not aways as glorious and smooth sailing experience as is described in the literature. Lovers beware. ( I wonder if I'm going to get in trouble for that allusion )

So if you want a system where the focus is on light weight and very good image quality that you can print at decent sizes the Fuji is great. The zooms are good, but imho the primes are the real strength.

If you want lighter weight but want the most in IQ - well then if I were you drinking buddy, I'd tell you to go out and buy a Nikon D850 and suck it up on the weight aspect. Zoom to zoom it will only be about three to five pounds. Eat some spinach, man.

My vote. Rent for a trip or two.




Sep 16, 2017 at 09:08 PM
AlexDROP
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


Leighton wrote:
I would suggest you browse the ton of information in this forum for awhile, say for a week. You'll soon discover all that you need to know. At the end of that week, if you still need some answers, you'll have a better idea of the route you want to take. BTW...your English is just fine.


The Fuji X community and FM community in general are so friendly that you guys clarified all my questions quickly. BTW I've been reading Fuji gear threads since when they were located in Alt gear threads. Thanks for a compliment to my English

---------------------------------------------

gdanmitchell wrote:
Given the number of questions you have, I'll agree with the previous poster that some general exploration of this forum may help you. I'll also give some general thoughts on the "switching" to the Fujifilm system for what I take to be your types of photography.

1. Rather than "switching" (e.g. — giving up one system and moving wholesale to another) I urge new adopters to try out the Fujifilm system before getting rid of the old gear. Also consider, at least for a while, using the Fujifilm gear to augment rather than replace your existing system. (In the end, that is
...Show more


Steve Wylie wrote:
I agree with this. You could travel the world with an X-Pro2, an X-T2 and these three lenses. They will fit in a small Domke bag that weighs practically nothing. That's my normal location kit. Or in a Think Tank Airport Essentials, with all of the chargers, cleaning supplies, etc., etc., which fits under an airplane seat. This is my normal go-to kit for European concert tours.


Dan and Steve, thanks for valuable advices. I'll keep them in mind if I decide switching or adding Fuji-X to my kit.

---------------------------------------------

Alanu wrote:
Alex, I urge you to purchase any of the 24mp Fuji bodies and just have fun and experiment.
I shoot Canon and Fuji and I've somehow managed to figure out where and when to use it.
The 16-35 f/4IS is truly a hard lens to beat when it comes to cityscape/landscape. Even though the 6D doesn't have the best dynamic range you can still manage great files with that full frame.

The Fuji 10-24mm f/4 is a great lens in the Fuji world but I just cant wait to test out the newer UWA from them.

Alex don't test the 5dmk4.......for a Canon
...Show more

doc4x5 wrote:
I moved to Fuji from the Nikon D800E with the X E-1 and now use an X T-2 exclusively. I had Nikon digital cameras beginning with the D70. I kept the D800E for quite a while while selling off the lenses. I still have three PC-E's, 24, 45, 85. The weight advantage is significant, the quality is really close. I just rented a Fuji GFX50S for a weekend and shot over 500 images in familiar places. The image quality difference is clearly visible at 100% on a screen and at 14x16" print size but only if you are looking for
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travelair wrote:
I've been a Nikon guy for about 40 years, being too lazy/cheap to switch, even when some other systems offered technical advantages. However, modern DSLR Nikons, and their respective AF lenses, are relative pigs compared to the FM2, FE and F3 bodies, and MF lenses, that formed the cornerstone of my Nikon experience. Wanting to lighten my load, I found the Fuji system, first with an X-E1, and now an X-T20, took me back a bit. As a long-time analog shooter, they just feel like a real camera, versus a computer with a lens attached. Something about the best camera
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Alanu, travelair and Eric, thanks for your personal experience and comparison of Canikon and Fuji-X. That's exactly what I looked for.

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itai195 wrote:
The main issue going with those three zooms is that the weight savings over a DSLR is a bit less. Of course, if the OP is comparing to a D750 + 16-35 + 70-200 f/4, then perhaps the 16-55 could be left out. Also, another way to fill the 24-85mm gap would be to get a 35/2 rather than a zoom, since it is tiny and light. Wide zoom, long zoom, and normal prime is actually a pretty common landscaper kit.


Thanks, mate. After some investigations I'm seriously considering 10-24 + 55-200 zoom set and 32/1.8 Touit lens to fulfill the gap in FL.

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Pavel wrote:
I love Fuji but I have to dissent with the normal "go jump in to the Fuji experience" a lot. Looking at the quality of your photos, you will find the Fuji sensor adequate, I believe, and near on par with what you have now. But for the weight advantage, which is often an illusion, you will be giving up a LOT of IQ compared to the D810 and especially the D850, likely, and especially in your niche shooting style. The X-T1 is a great sensor, don't get me wrong, especially if you like to shoot jpg's, but it just
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Pavel, thanks for an honest and unbiased opinion. The allusion is great and speaks for itself. Considering weight factor as the main switching force I have to admit it is not so huge as I could desire. With a tripod added it leads to 3.9kg (incl. 2 handgrips for 2 bodies and 3-4 spare batteries) while Canikon is around 4.5-4.6kg. 15% difference is not huge after all calculations. A pity. BTW I'm young and fit to lug around with a tripod and a backpack full of gear yet a low weight set-up is always welcome, you know

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Thank you all, guys, for your thoughts and shared experience. I'm very grateful. I think I should hold on a bit, take a pause in my GAS and pay more attention to editing my pictures brought from my last trip to Berlin and Dresden. Meantime I will continue reading forums and collecting opinions. Time will tell.
My main concern about Fuji-X for now is how malleable X-files are compared to ones from Canikon FF sensors.



Sep 17, 2017 at 09:04 AM
leighton w
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


AlexDROP wrote:
My main concern about Fuji-X for now is how malleable X-files are compared to ones from Canikon FF sensors.


I wouldn't worry too much about this. I can't tell you about Canon files, but, from my experience, I do a lot less in post now then I did with my Nikon FF raw files. YMMV.



Sep 17, 2017 at 09:58 AM
Pavel
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


leighton w wrote:
I wouldn't worry too much about this. I can't tell you about Canon files, but, from my experience, I do a lot less in post now then I did with my Nikon FF raw files. YMMV.


I agree with Leighton completely. Compared to both Olympus and Nikon bodies it's almost ridiculous how little post - processing is needed and how good the results. Especially with respect to sharpening. Easy on the sharpening and very little haloing while giving nice sharp files.

With the other brands I sort of have to work (and work) at it. I enjoy editing however, so that's no problem. But that said, the new Nikon models like the D810 I just played with a while allow more manipulation of the file. So I guess it goes don't to what you value.

For years I'd shot Canon and Nikon only in raw. With Fuji it's upset the apple-cart of what I "knew" to be true. The jpg's frankly as SO good, that now I always shoot full size jpg+raw, and the raw is for when I mess exposure up or the DR is too large in the scene. I wind up going with the jpg files more often than not. If someone had told me that prior to my getting on board with Fuji, I'd have thought - yeah right (fanboy)

I've also always been quite good at editing (better than shooting) and like it more than actually going out to take photos. That was the same in the darkroom. I've tried Lightroom and it's pluggins, which I find not at all identical to the Fuji colors, and as a long time user of Capture One - I find I'm far from getting as good or matched color out of the raw files as well. This has me waiting for the new Fuji raw studio in tremendous anticipation. As I said above, I consider the Fuji platform a concept in development. Nikon and Canon are sort of already matured. But that can be taken as a criticism and that isn't the way I mean it. I mean it more that if it isn't what you need right now - wait a while. It likely soon will be and perhaps more. They don't seem to "get the back focusing bunch, nor the cold weather glove wearing photographer as Some brands do, so I'll wait a while, as Fuji scrambles like no other brand to please

I will add also that I feel that the Nikon metering is more consisted if you shoot aperture priority, but you seem to have a very disciplined approach judging from your subject matter and results, so I don't think there are any deal breakers in what I've focused on.

I'm all on fire about the Nikon D850 just now. That should be factored in. Those files seem to be amazing. The shadow recovery is almost an impossible to believe thing. That could save my butt. I think your methodology may be what saves yours, so it hard to say.

And it is a friendly bunch here.

If you get on board with Fuji - make sure you post the results often and soon.





Sep 17, 2017 at 04:55 PM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


Steve Wylie wrote:
Intellectually, I agree with you, Dan. But from the first moment I held an X-Pro2, I knew I "needed" one. So I bought it, and it's my preferred camera for most of my Fuji lenses (I do have five primes). But for a lot of work I do, I need to pare down my kit, so the X-Pro2 and X-T2 come with me, along with these three zooms (in performance photography, I can't always zoom with my feet). So I have no problem mounting either the 10-24 or the 16-55 on the X-Pro2, with the 50-140 on the X-T2.
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I actually agree with your points about the XPro2. I also use the XPro2 and I do use zooms on it — the 16-55 and the 50-140. Like you, I think, my primary original reason for choosing the XPro2 over the XT2 (both of which are excellent) was that it was my intention to mostly use it with primes for lightweight street and travel photography — and with the primes I can work with the optical viewfinder, which has some advantages for street photography. (For example, I can see outside of the image frame while composing.)

Perhaps like you, also, I realized that the XPro2 is flexible and that I can also use it with zooms, relying on the EVF instead of the OVF in those situations. (The zooms are too large to use the OVF, and they block too much of the scene.) For me (and you?) this makes the XPro2 a sort of double-duty camera — primarily a lightweight rangefinder style camera for street/travel, but able to function quite well with zooms and the EVF for others stuff.

Earlier this summer I took this all the way, relying on the XPro2 with only a zoom lens to photograph a short backpacking trip into the Sierra Nevada along the northeastern border of Yosemite. It worked quite well. But the XT2 would work as well, too, if this were the only way I worked.

I may have missed something in the original post, but my impression was that that post suggested that the person intended to use only the zoom lenses though – making their use case a lot different than mine. For someone who plans to rely entirely on zooms I still say that the XT2 is the better choice — since they won't really make use of the OFV and they'll get a better EVF on the XT2.

YMMV.

Dan

with the 16-55mm lens on the Xpro2...







Edited on Sep 17, 2017 at 07:40 PM · View previous versions



Sep 17, 2017 at 05:41 PM
leighton w
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p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


Pavel wrote:
I agree with Leighton completely. Compared to both Olympus and Nikon bodies it's almost ridiculous how little post - processing is needed and how good the results. Especially with respect to sharpening. Easy on the sharpening and very little haloing while giving nice sharp files.

With the other brands I sort of have to work (and work) at it. I enjoy editing however, so that's no problem. But that said, the new Nikon models like the D810 I just played with a while allow more manipulation of the file. So I guess it goes don't to what you value.

For years
...Show more

Better watch what we say. Someone we know may come on this thread and ask that we prove our statements.



Sep 17, 2017 at 06:15 PM
gdanmitchell
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p.1 #20 · p.1 #20 · Fujiguys' advice needed (Switcher)


^^^
!

Speaking of that, I shared a new post in another thread that helps provide an objective datapoint about certain things that set somebody off for the past few days.

Not that it will convince "everyone." ;-)



Sep 17, 2017 at 07:39 PM







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