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Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the ot...
  
 
ggreene
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p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


I keep the current yearly work as RAW files on an SSD for fastest access and processing and move them to spinning hardrives at the end of the year. I use Carbon Copy Cloner to backup the SSD and hard drives. Triple copies with an offsite archive (at work). I also have a box.com account with the University that Jpeg versions of all athletic photos go to for easy access for Media Relations.


Sep 01, 2017 at 06:32 AM
artificialyello
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p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


The CR2s and SOOC JPEGs, the latter for quick access are in a stored in hierarchical folders for originals. I convert the CR2s to DNGs about once a year and store them in a separate folder, JIC. Couldn't care less about what Canon call them files since import them with PhotoMechanic...


Sep 01, 2017 at 07:17 AM
MintMar
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p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


I definitely store raws (+ processing parameters in separate file if I already processed these pictures) and big SOOC JPEGs along to see quickly what's in the raws.

The storage is a 4disk raid5 array "file server" and back it up on 2disk raid0 backup "server" from time to time, all locally.

The processing and storage is completely on Linux.



Sep 01, 2017 at 11:10 AM
tonyespofoto
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p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


I save all my RAW files plus the .xmp files in 3 locations; two are off site on hard drives and one is local, on my machine. The local is only for jobs that are still active. Along with the RAW files but in a separate folder are all the processed files, in the past stored as PSDs, now mostly as PSBs.It doesn't take much to exceed the PSD 2 GB file limitation size when using 16 bit files and modern cameras. All files are renamed with job numbers. If Jpegs are involved, they are also stored in a separate folder and are similarly renamed. If the PSD/PSBs involve retouching or serious manipulation, I keep them. If they are merely a means to the final job end, once the job is ready for archiving, I will only keep the final images and the RAW and .xmp files, as the PSDs can be regenerated from that data. Personal work is similarly stored, but in folders by date. It makes no sense to me to not store the raw files. Discarding them would be like throwing away your negatives and keeping the proof prints. It makes no sense to me to get involved in discussions about Adobe or Canon's futures or intents regarding the files. That's way above my pay grade and speculation about such topics can be just as easily answered by consulting tea leaves or a good psychic.


Sep 01, 2017 at 11:49 AM
CanadaMark
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p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


Those of you that have only local storage, are you not worried about that ever being a problem? Or have you taken other measures not described here?


Sep 01, 2017 at 06:11 PM
hotdog12
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p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


I store the RAW files, of course, since they are essentially the photographic "negative" of the image. Often I shoot RAW+jpeg so I'll just save both for ease. I also save the finished jpegs (I'm editorial photographer and my clients always want jpegs).

I don't see much point in DNG conversion--to me, it just adds an annoying extra step. So far all popular editing programs take care to be backwards compatible.



Sep 01, 2017 at 06:28 PM
OntheRez
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p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


John Caldwell wrote:
DNG. Cant imagine a future without Adobe.


One can dream In my too long involvement in computing, have seen things that supposedly would never go away. Anybody remember "Can't get fired for buying Big Blue?" Anybody remember IBM losing $5B USD - yeah, billion - in a single quarter? Anybody seen a ThinkPad any where? COBOL? Dbase? I could go on and list at least a dozen similar examples.

Regardless, I suspect that even if Canon goes TU there are probably billions of photos in .cr2 RAW. Likely to be supported for a long time. My keepers are saved as RAW. Also any images that I've done a lot of work on are saved as .TIFF or sometimes .PSD.




Sep 01, 2017 at 06:47 PM
rscheffler
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p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


My take on DNG conversion is two-fold.

1) I DNG convert with lossy compression (yes... WITH lossy compression) all job outtakes following client delivery. It reduces storage requirements for files I will 99.99% never look at ever again. I have made subjective comparisons and there is very, very little, if any, visual difference between conversions of original and compressed DNGs with moderate manipulation in post.

2) I don't DNG convert my keepers. My logic is as long as DNG Converter (or similar) exists, there will always be an app that can read and convert those files at a future time. I'd rather keep the originals for as long as possible.



Sep 01, 2017 at 06:48 PM
 

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elkhornsun
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p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


Files I have processed are saved as layered TIFF files. TIFF is the only universal lossless file format and it is public domain. It is used by all photo editing applications and an be sent to labs for printing out color corrected prints with the color space and it can be imported into graphics and web press printing applications.

DNG is proprietary to Adobe and I cannot send a DNG format file to my print lab or to a graphic artist or a commercial print shop. It lacks the shot information that is found in the RAW file which is lost during the conversion from the camera manufacturer' RAW format.

Another overlooked problem is that with Adobe you get a reverse engineered ACR application to do the RAW conversion so the output is inferior at the very first step of the post processing workflow.




Sep 01, 2017 at 09:52 PM
NorthMac
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p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


OntheRez wrote:
One can dream In my too long involvement in computing, have seen things that supposedly would never go away. Anybody remember "Can't get fired for buying Big Blue?" Anybody remember IBM losing $5B USD - yeah, billion - in a single quarter? Anybody seen a ThinkPad any where? COBOL? Dbase? I could go on and list at least a dozen similar examples.


I think John's point was more that Adobe, the company, is now a very large, public, widely held firm, and it is hard to see the firm disappearing or significantly changing its busines focus in the near to mid term. Just for curiousity and on the same point, I looked up Phase One's ownership (since Capture One seems the main replacement for Adobe products). PhaseOne is private, and 60% owned by a UK private equity firm. If I am betting on longevity and stability, PE firms will be low on my list...



Sep 01, 2017 at 11:06 PM
melcat
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p.2 #11 · p.2 #11 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


Notionally, my "archive" format is 16-bit TIFF, without layers, and the RAID array I use is sized to reflect that.

But as an expedient I don't convert most of them. I don't have a USB 3 port on this machine, and I wanted to keep backup times down and buy smaller backup drives. I've made sure I know how to generate the "missing" TIFFs at any time and even did a "dry run" to make sure my procedure would work.

For all images, I store the original .CR2 and the .xmp "sidecar" that Adobe Camera Raw made. I don't use Lightroom. In the past, I sometimes edited the .xmp sidecars directly with other tools (they are just XML), for example to add lens metadata for adapted lenses or fix timestamps. If a TIFF has been generated, it lives beside the .CR2 and .xmp file in the same directory (folder). Every raw image has an .xmp sidecar; this is a side effect of adding copyright during ingestion.

The .xmp sidecars also contain caption and copyright information, which is propagated to downstream TIFFs. I am comfortable with the XMP being the master copy of that, because I have tools to extract it.

I do always convert to TIFF:

- any file where I edited the .xmp outside Adobe's software, which includes every image I ever shot with adapted lenses. This is because I am not confident Adobe's software will continue to accept those edited tags - it already decided to throw away time zone information in the past.

- any image which has had significant editing, such as a custom curve, or even just a simple crop. This way I know if my Adobe software suddenly stops working. I will never need to find software that understands the editing instructions ACR puts in the .xmp sidecars (as far as I know, no such software exists).

- any image from sessions where I used the ColorChecker Passport to make a custom profile (as distinct from the standard profiles I made that I normally use). This means I don't need to store those profiles. (For these images, I do create a .DNG, which embeds the custom profile, and store that next to the .CR2, .xmp and TIFF files in the same directory, so I could reprocess those raw files if I wanted.)

I will convert to TIFF sooner rather than later:

- all my Sony .ARWs. Like most raws, .ARWs use TIFF as a container, but the RX1 firmware writes invalid TIFF. It seems to me very likely that in a few years a lot of software will choke on these files.

I don't keep many .PSD files from intermediate edits. They are huge and proprietary. This works for me, because once I've finished an image it's finished. If this isn't you, .PSD is at least documented so in that sense it's probably a safeish archive format.

Both .CR2 and .DNG are likely to be readable indefinitely into the future (they both use TIFF as a container). The problem is not preserving the data that came off the sensor. The problem is preserving the edits I made in post. As far as I know, the major raw converters refuse to read each others' editing instructions, so the only solution is saving the final edited image as TIFF.



Sep 02, 2017 at 07:01 AM
Lauchlan Toal
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p.2 #12 · p.2 #12 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


I keep the raw files, storing them on two HDDs in the house, with BackBlaze cloud storage as extra back-up in case something happens to both HDDs at once. Usually I only keep the final edit as a jpeg (also stored on two HDDs and BackBlaze), but if it's a complex edit or I expect to revisit it I'll also keep the PSD file. I also upload some of my favourite shots to Flickr in full res for worst case scenario back-up.


Sep 02, 2017 at 07:20 PM
John Caldwell
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p.2 #13 · p.2 #13 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


Not here to argue that Adobe is infallible. As I see it, the number of users that have stake Adobe's file formats, be them PSD or DNG, is large enough that the file format will live long enough that some party will maintain a path forward for using those formats, even if that party is not Adobe.


Sep 03, 2017 at 11:22 PM
Sy Sez
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p.2 #14 · p.2 #14 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


I store both raw, & processed image files on three external, SATA hard-drives; one attached to my computer, and two kept in a sealed, fire-proof safe.


Sep 07, 2017 at 12:03 AM
Sy Sez
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p.2 #15 · p.2 #15 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


Weird FM behavior:

I posted the reply in the Canon Forum; & when I clicked :Send Reply, the page shows up as the Nikon forum?



Sep 07, 2017 at 12:07 AM
rattlebonez
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p.2 #16 · p.2 #16 · Your archiving format: Why did you choose it over the other formats.


The first step is to delete all of the bad photos, out of focus, numerous repeats of the same shot.
That keeps the RAW files to a manageable size.

1. Store RAW files, and work in progress (TIF, JPG) on the internal drive
2. Automatic scheduled Time Mahcine backup to thunderblot connected drive occurs hourly (Mac OS X)
3. Occasionally change out Time Machine backup with another drive that is kept in the safe
4. Update Time Machine backups on other drives that get taken offsite (2 offsite locations with family)

Hard drives are cheap so several offsites, and a few in the safe. Offsites can be encrypted



Sep 07, 2017 at 12:38 AM
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