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How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark ...
  
 
rw11
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a raw file?


How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a photo?

say using LR 6...

and does it vary much from FF to 1" sensors ??



Jul 30, 2017 at 10:11 PM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a raw file?


It all depends on the dynamic range of THAT sensor at the ISO of the exposure, and the exact exposure relative to the scene being photographed, and, of course, at what point YOU consider the noise objectionable even if you might be bringing out some detail.


Jul 31, 2017 at 04:48 AM
mbphoto_2.8
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a raw file?


Check out the iso-invariance tests DPReview performs on cameras they test.

Some sensors can be pushed as far as 6 stops from base iso (Nikon D810 up to 4 stops), whereas others shouldn't be pushed at all (e.g. most Canon sensors) but rather higher iso must be used.



Jul 31, 2017 at 10:34 AM
Bernie
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a raw file?


The D750 can be pushed a lot, at least 5 stops and more with some work Compare this with the following shot.


Jul 31, 2017 at 03:25 PM
rattlebonez
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a raw file?


It seems pushing the shadows too much results in poor colors and contrast most of the time regardless of camera model

Then saving to low DR jpg format

That said, I prefer to use photo-realistic HDR



Jul 31, 2017 at 03:54 PM
 

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mbphoto_2.8
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a raw file?


@ratllebonez
Well, obviously, since the same shot at iso 3200 would also severly suffer in colour reproduction.

The only way around that is with more light. Either expose longer, or shoot a wider aperture.
Both aren't always possible.



Jul 31, 2017 at 06:16 PM
elkhornsun
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a raw file?


In my own tests I can produce a better dynamic range with a 1-stop overexposure than a 1-stop underexposure. Easy to test for yourself. With an underexposure information is missing entirely and so no recovery is going to be possible. The image may seem recoverable but the color fidelity is lacking.


Aug 10, 2017 at 12:12 AM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a raw file?


"In my own tests I can produce a better dynamic range with a 1-stop overexposure than a 1-stop underexposure. Easy to test for yourself. With an underexposure information is missing entirely and so no recovery is going to be possible. The image may seem recoverable but the color fidelity is lacking."

Your camera sensor has a fixed dynamic range at a given ISO rating. Nothing will change that. The dynamic ranges does not change. Where you place the exposure within that range might though, so all you are really saying is that the exposure you *thought* was one stop over was really just closer to being correct than the one you thought was under.



Aug 10, 2017 at 04:02 AM
Alan321
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · How many stops worth of detail can you pull up from dark areas of a raw file?


Think about how far you need to pull up the dark areas. A Nikon D810 or D800(E) image can handle the shadows being pulled up as much as five stops to reveal clean but dark-ish details, but that is only if the image was taken at minimum ISO However, you would not normally expect to bring shadow details up to the brightness level of well lit parts of the scene without seeing excessive noise. At higher ISOs these cameras lose dynamic range mostly from the dark end of the scale, and so the 5-stop margin reduces to nothing. The same sort of thing happens with all cameras.

Some camera image files will not let you retrieve much shadow detail without showing hard-to-clean pattern noise. That is much worse than showing random noise.

In general, a full frame sensor captures more light and gives cleaner images for the same level of image detail. Then again, some cameras clean images at the expense of darker details. So "clean" does not necessarily relate to "more of the useable details".

Go to the DxOmark website and play with different cameras. Ignore their summary results completely, because they fail to condense all of the relevant info into a truly useful single number. However, look at the test results and particularly the dynamic range (DR) chart. There you will see how the DR changes with ISO. Keep in mind that their DR bottoms out when the detail level is matched by the noise level, whereas you might reasonably expect a lot more detail than noise for an image to be acceptable. Even so, their results are relevant because they are all measured the same way regardless of camera. One camera will still be two stops better than another whether or not you want to take a few stops off the total DR for both cameras.
- Check it out and you'll better understand what I'm talking about.



Aug 14, 2017 at 05:40 AM







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