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Tilt shift lens for landscape photography
  
 
AJSJones
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p.3 #1 · p.3 #1 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


jcolwell wrote:
Yeah. I use it for the Canon TS-E 17/4L and 24/3.5L II, as well as the Mamiya C 55/2.8 N, 80/2.8 N, A 150/2.8, and A 200/2.8 APO lenses on a Mirex M645 to EOS adapter.

These specific M645 lenses are at least as sharp (edge to edge) as anything in "35mm format", from Canon L, Leica R, and Zeiss CY/ZE. Other M645 lenses are OK, and some are relatively poor. The A 120/4 Macro is also excellent, but I rarely use it with movements.

P.S. I prefer using figures, but they're simply plotted from tabular data, that's calculated in my
...Show more

I knew there was a reason I've never needed to create a table for those, but my table matches yours and Keith's so I must have used the right equation too (I never needed tables when I used the loupe on the GG of my Ebony - you can just see it!)



Jul 20, 2017 at 08:26 PM
Daniel Smith
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p.3 #2 · p.3 #2 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


Buy a 4x5 and learn to use it. You will shoot less and end up with more keepers.


Jul 21, 2017 at 07:20 PM
G-Four
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p.3 #3 · p.3 #3 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


I actually still have my fathers 4x5 field camera and several lens which is what got me thinking about a tilt shift lens. I have considered film but just am not excited about learning a hole new process.


Daniel Smith wrote:
Buy a 4x5 and learn to use it. You will shoot less and end up with more keepers.




Jul 22, 2017 at 07:52 PM
Zenon Char
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p.3 #4 · p.3 #4 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


I read all of Ansel's Adams books, purchased a 4 by 5 field kit camera made by Bender. Made my own vacuum tables for the darkroom, etc. Had a lot of great years but I'll never go back to the darkroom again. I really think it helped me with my B&W conversions and photography in genera when I went to digital.

I rented the Canon 24 TSE II. Great lens. Excellent to the corners. It occurred to me that later in life I just don't have the patience like I used to so it would have been a novelty to me. If I had unlimited funds it would be in my lens collection. So would the 17 TSE II. I have seen some very nice shots from the 17.

As for 24 vs 17. My local mom and pop camera store told me that while you lose wider perspective 24 is widest point where things still look natural. No slight curvatures. I'm not sure I'm explaining this correctly. I've never used the 17mm so I can't say if that lens does not suffer this. It is designed for this propose.



Jul 23, 2017 at 04:05 PM
Zenon Char
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p.3 #5 · p.3 #5 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


Forgot to add. The conversation at the store was about basic lenses, not the TSE's.


Jul 23, 2017 at 04:07 PM
karlfoto
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p.3 #6 · p.3 #6 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


jcolwell - How many degrees of tilt would one generally use for a near far landscape.

I have tried to use tilt on the 17tse, but have never found that it works that well, with areas of the scene out of focus where i really thought it would have been in focus all the way from near to infinity.

I have heard it said that the 17 suffers from some sort of optical issue that causes this, and that the 24 is better when tilted.

Any comments welcome.



Jul 24, 2017 at 02:39 PM
 

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AJSJones
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p.3 #7 · p.3 #7 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


karlfoto wrote:
jcolwell - How many degrees of tilt would one generally use for a near far landscape.

I have tried to use tilt on the 17tse, but have never found that it works that well, with areas of the scene out of focus where i really thought it would have been in focus all the way from near to infinity.

I have heard it said that the 17 suffers from some sort of optical issue that causes this, and that the 24 is better when tilted.

Any comments welcome.


See jcolwell's graph on the prvious page. The thing that makes the biggest difference is the height of the lens above the ground. Once you measure/guess that, find that distance on the height scale (the horizontal scale), then imagine a line vertically up from there to see where it hits the thick black line (labeled 17 or 24) and read off the tilt value by looking left at the vertical tilt scale on the left. The chart assumes the camera back is vertical.

If you prefer tables, there's one here



Jul 24, 2017 at 03:54 PM
sjaskovi
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p.3 #8 · p.3 #8 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


+1 for the 24L TS-E II as well. I bought it on release and have used it to take numerous great landscape photos, though I am considering moving away from Canon this is one of the lenses that makes it a hard decision.


Jul 24, 2017 at 04:31 PM
jcolwell
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p.3 #9 · p.3 #9 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


karlfoto wrote:
jcolwell - How many degrees of tilt would one generally use for a near far landscape.

I have tried to use tilt on the 17tse, but have never found that it works that well, with areas of the scene out of focus where i really thought it would have been in focus all the way from near to infinity.

I have heard it said that the 17 suffers from some sort of optical issue that causes this, and that the 24 is better when tilted.

Any comments welcome.


As Andy mentioned, the TS-E 17mm doesn't need much tilt. When it's on my tripod, which puts the sensor at about 1.66m above the ground, it needs only 0.6 deg of tilt to put the horizontal plane in focus, from nearly at your feet, and to infinity and beyond. In practice, you often don't need any tilt with the 17mm, for most landscape shots, even with content in the sort-of foreground (e.g. flowers a few metres away). OTOH, when the lens is lowered to within 0.3m (1 ft) of the ground, and it's pointed in a horizontal direction, it needs about 3 deg of tilt, which is still not much. When you use more tilt than required to simply rotate the plane of focus from parallel to the sensor, to parallel to the ground (i.e. 0.6 deg on a tripod), then weird stuff starts to happen, as the plane of focus collapses to a line. Then, you can get effects like the classic, large-format "toy city" kind of image, where a few things are in focus (you can select where), and everything else quickly fades to OOF. This distorts the apparent scale of the image, and big stuff like buildings and buses, can look really small, like toys.

AFAIK, the TS-E 17 doesn't have any "optical issues" at all. It's an excellent lens. It takes some knowledge and practice to it use effectively. IOW, it's a skill that you can acquire.



Jul 24, 2017 at 07:59 PM
karlfoto
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p.3 #10 · p.3 #10 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


Thanks for the answer to my question and sorry for the late response, I have been dealing with a broken leg for the past 6 weeks, the result of a mountain bike accident.

I will follow the table that u have made and see how it works out for my lens and scenes in practise.

Also for those not sure of getting the 17 or the 24 tse. I use a 1.4x III canon convertor on my 17 tse which gets it to 24mm, the quality even on a 1 meter enlargement is excellent. This was a comparison shot against my 24-70f4, which while not the best 24mm, is not slouch. It is a bit of a fiddle to take on and off the adaptor, from the 17, but in the mean time it is a good alternative for me.



Sep 11, 2017 at 06:34 AM
Peter Figen
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p.3 #11 · p.3 #11 · Tilt shift lens for landscape photography


Actually, the 17mm t/s-e DOES have optical issues when tilted even a very slight amount. The far corners immediately go soft and no amount of re-focusing can fix that. The 24mm t/s-e does not have that optical problem, thankfully. If I need near far focus with the 17mm, I always focus stack.


Sep 11, 2017 at 02:15 PM
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