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Skin tones ranges
  
 
ahaug
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Skin tones ranges


So I tend to like warm skin tones. I think that there is are are limits between warm and gross yellow / orange. Sometimes I have a hard time processing and end up not sure if my eye is drifting into the land of too warm. I'm uploading these two images. One is what I would consider close to neutral and the other is on the strong end of "warm". I'm looking for advice on what is too much with skin tone ranges. Also if there are any tips on getting good skin tones ... that would be well received.












Jul 14, 2017 at 10:26 PM
EB-1
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Skin tones ranges


The second one has a lot of blue in the white dress. That's all I can go by, but maybe the fabric is blue-ish? Have you profiled the camera or do you have another means to calibrate?

EBH



Jul 15, 2017 at 03:00 AM
ahaug
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Skin tones ranges


I use capture pro one so I can't profile the camera. Do you think that the first picture is too warm?


Jul 15, 2017 at 04:50 AM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Skin tones ranges


The first one feels a bit warm, but considering they are both red-heads, it seems about right. Remember there is "correct" color and then there is emotional color. It's up to you do decide what you want for a particular image. I prefer the first one here but with different hair coloring it might be the other way around. And the greenery also affects the way you perceive skin tones as well.

Finally, there is a really fantastic Skin Tool in Capture One where you can fine tune the skin tones without affecting the rest of the image. And, yes, you absolutely can profile any camera you want in Capture One but to do it properly it's really more trouble than it's worth. Phase spends considerable time tweaking their input profile to provide a generally pleasing result. Thankfully they also give you incredibly powerful color correction tools where you can actually make color and tonal adjustments and actually save that out as a new ICC input profile. Once you get to know these tools you'll wonder how you ever got on without them.

Peter



Jul 15, 2017 at 07:00 AM
ahaug
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Skin tones ranges


I agree with everything that you said. I love Capture pro one and the skin tone tools in the white balance and color editor. A problem that I have is sometimes letting too much reds and yellows into the images for the "emotional color". I wish that there was a seminar I could take on dialing in my eyeballs to great skin tones. I'll edit a wedding and think that I did a good job and then the next morning I realize that the images are all too warm. I guess that there is a lot of subjectivity with skin tones but how can I improve in my eyeballs to get good tones quickly and on the first time?

Peter Figen wrote:
The first one feels a bit warm, but considering they are both red-heads, it seems about right. Remember there is "correct" color and then there is emotional color. It's up to you do decide what you want for a particular image. I prefer the first one here but with different hair coloring it might be the other way around. And the greenery also affects the way you perceive skin tones as well.

Finally, there is a really fantastic Skin Tool in Capture One where you can fine tune the skin tones without affecting the rest of the image. And,
...Show more




Jul 15, 2017 at 01:20 PM
howardm4
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Skin tones ranges


I think the first one is 'better' than the second but I might dial back the warmth on the 1st one just a smidge or just leave it be.

check 'dcamprof' (or it's GUI counterpart) for profiling for CaptureOne.



Jul 15, 2017 at 01:39 PM
 

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ahaug
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Skin tones ranges


howardm4 wrote:
I think the first one is 'better' than the second but I might dial back the warmth on the 1st one just a smidge or just leave it be.

check 'dcamprof' (or it's GUI counterpart) for profiling for CaptureOne.


here is the first one dialed down a bit with skin tone tool in color editor. Is that in a better ball park?








Jul 15, 2017 at 02:04 PM
DougVaughn
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Skin tones ranges


I find the image you just posted this morning very pleasing, but I'm the wrong person to ask. I'm still looking for the software that says "you're in range and not doing something crazy." because I have a constant battle from being color blind. I was hoping to scroll down the thread and find that magic bullet. I wish my subjects liked black and white as much as I do because I'd just give up getting the color right and go b&w.


Jul 15, 2017 at 03:43 PM
Robert Snow
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Skin tones ranges


I also am Red/Green color deficient. That said, there are many articles on determining correct skin tones around (Google) using RGB values, but for several years I have used one little gimmick that seems to work.

Assuming you use PS, in the INFO thingie which normally resides at the upper right side of the program, set the second readout to HSL. "H" stands for hue, and an acceptable hue for human skin normally runs between 16 and 23 with normal Caucasians usually ranging between 18-22. This can be achieved easily using the hue/saturation tool. Add a duplicate layer, create a black mask on it, adjust the color then paint in the face(s) with white. Much easier to do than describe.

Beware of females with facial cosmetics which distort these values a little or a lot. In these cases, take your reading from neck or arm...or something other than the main part of the face.

Hope this helps,

bob snow



Jul 16, 2017 at 02:09 PM
ahaug
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Skin tones ranges


don't regularly use ps but maybe I will just to get the skin tones right.

Robert Snow wrote:
I also am Red/Green color deficient. That said, there are many articles on determining correct skin tones around (Google) using RGB values, but for several years I have used one little gimmick that seems to work.

Assuming you use PS, in the INFO thingie which normally resides at the upper right side of the program, set the second readout to HSL. "H" stands for hue, and an acceptable hue for human skin normally runs between 16 and 23 with normal Caucasians usually ranging between 18-22. This can be achieved easily using the hue/saturation tool. Add a duplicate layer, create a
...Show more




Jul 18, 2017 at 10:18 PM
Robert Snow
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Skin tones ranges


You can also get the same dialog in PS Elements. Load it from the Windows menu item. Also, in either it or PS you can set up the hue in the Color Picker down at the bottom left side of your screen.

Also, in later versions of Elements, go to the Enhancements > Color correction > Correct Skin Color and use the picker to click on an appropriate place to auto set color. If you don't like it, there is a dialog there to correct it to you liking. Pretty neat feature. It is not in CS6 and earlier versions of PS...just Elements.

Hope this helps.



Jul 19, 2017 at 02:15 AM
litaliti18
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Skin tones ranges


Very good post! We will be linking to this great content on our website. Thank so much!
transformice



Jul 21, 2017 at 04:35 AM







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