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Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher
  
 
Hammy
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p.2 #1 · p.2 #1 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


"To make money in photography, it's 10% taking photos, 90% marketing"

I read that over 16 years ago...turns out to be VERY true!

Otherwise, as most of us male sports 'tographers, we worry too much about technical details...lighting, crop/zoom, horizon, noise, etc... It's not bad to get those things right, but generally GETTING the shot is more important that how the shot was taken.



Jul 19, 2017 at 04:03 AM
dugaut
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p.2 #2 · p.2 #2 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


1. get the eyes
2. bring/use less gear; use it better
3. do your homework on the players/plays/strategies so you can anticipate
4. shoot the crowd



Jul 19, 2017 at 09:48 AM
Anet01
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p.2 #3 · p.2 #3 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


1. Shoot all the way through.....Keep shooting, keep shooting, keep shooting. Don't put the camera down and miss the reaction.




Jul 30, 2017 at 07:44 PM
joe chance
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p.2 #4 · p.2 #4 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


NEVER take your eyes away from the action or you could end up being in the action.



Jul 31, 2017 at 02:05 AM
OntheRez
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p.2 #5 · p.2 #5 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Anet01 wrote:
1. Shoot all the way through.....Keep shooting, keep shooting, keep shooting. Don't put the camera down and miss the reaction.




Never had a mentor, but this nails it. Don't be a spectator. Shoot! Don't watch!

Oh, know how to roll to protect your gear. Body heals. Camera doesn't
Ask me how I know.



Aug 07, 2017 at 05:35 PM
Herb
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p.2 #6 · p.2 #6 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Stay out of the way


Aug 11, 2017 at 08:29 PM
darryn patch
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p.2 #7 · p.2 #7 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


noone has mentioned


actually have a complete understanding of the sport you are shooting so you know what to shoot and when to shoot





Aug 24, 2017 at 07:27 AM
SnapperHed
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p.2 #8 · p.2 #8 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Marty Bingham wrote:
1. Just about anything P Alesse says.

2. But one thing he posted has honestly made a bigger impact on my development than anything else, books and classes included, was a quick post processing recipe he posted years ago. Just a quick crop/levels/unsharp mask combo. I threw in some shortcut keys and can now tidy up a photo in under 5 seconds. It really was a tipping point in my photography.

Marty


Interested in learning more about this. Can you elaborate or share the post? Thanks



Aug 25, 2017 at 04:13 AM
MikalWGrass
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p.2 #9 · p.2 #9 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Me too.



Aug 25, 2017 at 10:52 AM
Pyrat
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p.2 #10 · p.2 #10 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Me three.


Aug 25, 2017 at 09:41 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



Marty Bingham
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p.2 #11 · p.2 #11 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Marty Bingham wrote:
1. Just about anything P Alesse says.

2. But one thing he posted has honestly made a bigger impact on my development than anything else, books and classes included, was a quick post processing recipe he posted years ago. Just a quick crop/levels/unsharp mask combo. I threw in some shortcut keys and can now tidy up a photo in under 5 seconds. It really was a tipping point in my photography.

Marty


SnapperHed wrote:
Interested in learning more about this. Can you elaborate or share the post? Thanks


---------------------------------------------

MikalWGrass wrote:
Me too.


---------------------------------------------

Pyrat wrote:
Me three.


I think I might have over sold this. Seriously.

This is beginner level processing that came to me at the right time, eliminating a lot of trial and error.

The biggest take away is that the stuff coming out of your camera should be close enough to right that these few enhancements make it better. Not that it is a magic bullet to fix a crappy shot.

With that disclaimer in place here goes.

1. Original Photograph straight out of camera.
Picture1 by snaptie2002, on Flickr

2. Crop to taste.
Picture2 by snaptie2002, on Flickr

3. Rotate crop to vertical, if needed, using vertical or horizontal lines in the back ground as a guide.
Picture3 by snaptie2002, on Flickr

4. You should apply levels after cropping the photo so your readings are not influenced by colors that are irrelevant to the subject, like a bright or dark area in the background. Here is a histogram of the un-cropped Photograph.
Picture4 by snaptie2002, on Flickr

5. Histogram of cropped photograph. Note the difference.
Picture5 by snaptie2002, on Flickr

6. To adjust levels, move the middle slider to the right until the number in the center box reaches .97 (or whatever gives you good midtones) and leave it there. Move the two outside sliders to just inside the edges of the histogram, these numbers will vary from one photograph to the next. Tweak the outside sliders to suit your personal preference.
Picture6 by snaptie2002, on Flickr

7. Apply unsharp mask with the following settings. Amount-100%, Radius -1.0 pixels, Threshold -1 (adjust to taste)
Picture7 by snaptie2002, on Flickr

8. Finished photograph.
Picture8 by snaptie2002, on Flickr

Keep in mind that these are my personal preferences and I was shooting with a D200 back when I put this together. I find myself using unsharp mask less and less these days. Also, I'm not ashamed to admit that I hit the auto color shortcut quite a bit.

I hope this helps someone and the rest are not too disappointed. But, Hey, it works for me.

Marty










Aug 28, 2017 at 08:46 PM
Pinthura
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p.2 #12 · p.2 #12 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Thank you for posting. I for certain can learn from the cheat sheet.


Aug 29, 2017 at 08:04 AM
Microdol
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p.2 #13 · p.2 #13 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Did anyone say 'know your sport, know the athletes, but know the coaches better'

1) You need to know the sport so you can anticipate. ie if it is football and it's 4th and 14, it is doubtful they will run the ball.
2) If they are going to pass, who is the likely receiver, what side of the field are they on, what is the score.
3) You might be able to know a coach's tendencies.

A few other things: If 'all' the photographers are going one way, go the other. Else you will get the same shots as everyone else.
Depending on the sport, shoot a large aperture, as you don't want to have your foreground, and especially the background, as in-focus as the subject.

I come from a film background, so I trust what I am shooting more than post-shoot software 'fixing' of the image. I may adjust contrast, but I do little else with software.



Sep 11, 2017 at 03:41 AM
markedman
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p.2 #14 · p.2 #14 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Time is your enemy. Be efficient. Work smarter not harder. Attention spans are short. Go for the hot sale. When I printed on location there was little time for post production. Crop, lighten-print. Have a sign up list to notify people when the photos are posted. This will give you a mailing list to promote sales or special events. Keep in mind that if you are shooting on spec there is no need to photograph all participants. Identify yourself to everyone. That will give you some clues as to who may be buying later. Then concentrate on the ones who will "open their wallet" later. Step out of your comfort zone. Also look for events/activities that are under covered or unique. Something not done three times a week. EVERYONE shoots baseball, volleyball, football, etc.. Just my opinion from 17+ years of doing this "insanity"


Oct 04, 2017 at 03:15 PM
Weasel_Loader
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p.2 #15 · p.2 #15 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Sacrifice noise for shutter speed on action shots. Noisy images are more useable than blurred shots.

Love my D5!!!



Oct 04, 2017 at 03:22 PM
Stripper
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p.2 #16 · p.2 #16 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Don't work without getting paid. Pretty simple.

JohnCote



Oct 09, 2017 at 01:45 AM
pjbuehner
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p.2 #17 · p.2 #17 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Lots of great advice here. I wanted to add to the shooting for free on occasion.

When I shoot for free (extremely rarely) or less than normal, I do it for a reason, and I always show the value. The way I do this is by putting my normal price on the contract and then showing a discount (for friends and family or whatever the reason) as another line below.
This way, the client knows that they got a deal and are appreciative. I also ask them to quote the pre-discount price if anybody asks. This way I have not started to undermine my target pricing.




Oct 09, 2017 at 01:55 PM
Frank Lauri
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p.2 #18 · p.2 #18 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


From my good friend Paul Alesse:

1. Practice, Practice, and Practice. And when you think you're done practicing - practice some more.

2. Shoot tight and crop tighter.

3. Get it right in camera.

4. Shoot thru the play.

5. HAVE FUN.

Although they all carry a certain element of importance....for me it was #3. Getting your craft to a level where you can just do a quick levels adjustment really was the turning point for me. Up until then it was a lot of bitching and frustration and with Photoshop being a monster itself....having to deal with images where the WB was all over the place then to spend sometimes 30 minutes on 1 image.....only to trash it and start over - was really messing with my OCD and there were times I was ready to pack it in. After #3....#5 started to take place and the rest is history.




Oct 09, 2017 at 03:32 PM
Scott Sewell
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p.2 #19 · p.2 #19 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Frank Lauri wrote:
From my good friend Paul Alesse:

1. Practice, Practice, and Practice. And when you think you're done practicing - practice some more.

2. Shoot tight and crop tighter.

3. Get it right in camera.

4. Shoot thru the play.

5. HAVE FUN.

Although they all carry a certain element of importance....for me it was #3. Getting your craft to a level where you can just do a quick levels adjustment really was the turning point for me. Up until then it was a lot of bitching and frustration and with Photoshop being a monster itself....having to deal with images where the WB was all over
...Show more


Ding, ding, ding!!! We have a winner!!

I always say, "Practice Makes Permanent." Think about it...none of us is perfect, but with continued practice, what we do (assuming we've got the technical abilities and good work habits) becomes permanent.



Oct 10, 2017 at 04:53 PM
P Alesse
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p.2 #20 · p.2 #20 · Best Advice You've Received as a Sports Photgrpaher


Scott Sewell wrote:
Ding, ding, ding!!! We have a winner!!

I always say, "Practice Makes Permanent." Think about it...none of us is perfect, but with continued practice, what we do (assuming we've got the technical abilities and good work habits) becomes permanent.


... all that and a Mark IV would solve that.



Oct 10, 2017 at 08:34 PM
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