Home · Register · Software · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username  

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Pro Digital Corner | Join Upload & Sell

1       2       3              9      
10
       11       end
  

Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?
  
 
garydavidjones
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #1 · p.10 #1 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


Keep drinking the Cool-aid. Ample statistical studies showing 23%.
Google it. You will learn. Denial is not a way of life.



Jul 20, 2017 at 02:44 AM
rw11
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #2 · p.10 #2 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


glort wrote:
[
23%, almost 1 in 4 seemed extremely unlikley to me.
I looked it up and couldn't find anything to support that figure. Highest total unemployment numbers I could find was 17% in 2009. Reported is currently 4.4 with actual being cited at 8.7.
Thats a hell of a long way from 23%.

I think there is enough stretching of fact and opinion here already. Best to keep facts as accurate as possible rather than blow them out at least 3 fold.

I do agree and have always said that bringing more people into a country that does not have enough jobs
...Show more

you didn't include 'alex jones' in your search



Jul 20, 2017 at 04:25 AM
Mikehit
Online
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.10 #3 · p.10 #3 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


garydavidjones wrote:
In the USA actual unemployment is 23% and rising. (Since the 1990s long-term
unemployed are no longer counted to minimize the "official unemployment" rate.)
According to Oxford University studies, almost half of all jobs will be lost by
2033 resulting in unemployment rates up to 70%. Cause: automation.
Real yearly inflation in US is around 10%. Meanwhile average wages
are dropping. In much of the Los Angeles WORKING families of 4 or more
live in one-bedroom apartments. Legal and illegal immigration rates into
the USA continue rising.
USS Titanic is sinking rapidly. still afloat due to printing dollars out of thin
air by the Fed. Once the US
...Show more

Not really sure what that has to do with the thread.




Jul 20, 2017 at 08:04 AM
jecottrell
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.10 #4 · p.10 #4 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


garydavidjones wrote:
Ample statistical studies showing 23%.


Your source please?

Current U3 and U6 is ~4.4 and 8.4%.


You may need to switch from aluminum foil to Velostat.



Jul 20, 2017 at 07:53 PM
garydavidjones
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #5 · p.10 #5 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


shadowstats.com. numerous info sources in the blogs of Paul Craig Roberts,
who served in the administration of Reagan.

will not reply to any more ad hominem insults. Enjoy what little time
we have left.

How was my earlier comment relevant to this thread? In desperate times
someone will always work for less. Hence the declining incomes of
professional photographers, especially since there is no credential or
professional license required.




Jul 21, 2017 at 04:12 PM
rw11
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #6 · p.10 #6 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


does that apply to economists too?

I'd stick to real economists.



Jul 21, 2017 at 06:27 PM
Daniel Smith
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #7 · p.10 #7 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


Getty and the like have done more to erode the value of images than all the hobby photographers in the world. They will license use of an image for a Dollar, the same market we used to license work to for no less than $200.

How do they even keep track of royalties when they sub license images so cheaply? They screw their photographers and have hurt the industry.



Jul 22, 2017 at 01:32 AM
thenoilif
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #8 · p.10 #8 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


garydavidjones wrote:
shadowstats.com. numerous info sources in the blogs of Paul Craig Roberts,
who served in the administration of Reagan.

will not reply to any more ad hominem insults. Enjoy what little time
we have left.

How was my earlier comment relevant to this thread? In desperate times
someone will always work for less. Hence the declining incomes of
professional photographers, especially since there is no credential or
professional license required.



You would think that a photography forum would be free of doom-and-gloom political rhetoric but noooooo.

Anyways, Gary David Jones (tin foil experts would peg you as an assassin in the making with that name) you're right in that the unemployment rate in America could be 23% but you are leaving out a key bit of information with that number. The extra 12% or so includes people who are capable of working but choose not to. This includes students and early retirees. In addition, there is an ever growing population of creative entrepreneurs or as they like to be called 'digital nomads', you know those young millennials who travel around the US and the world sitting in coffee shops on their MacBooks with their Fuji X-T2 next to their Flat White Latte blogging about how to save the world.

The point is, the actual relevant numbers, when it comes to people who are looking for ANY job they can to put food on the table are relatively low, 4-6% being totally believable.



Jul 22, 2017 at 02:02 AM
markd61
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #9 · p.10 #9 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


jecottrell wrote:


It's starting to sound like the argument between two prostitutes. You know, where one belittles the other for being a hooker while claiming that she, herself is an "escort".


Actually, I agree.

If you like getting "worked" for free, more power to you. But you can't complain that people won't pay because you have been giving free samples as your entire business model.

I get paid better because I reliably provide a fun time for people who will pay full price for the "fun".



Jul 24, 2017 at 04:03 PM
markd61
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #10 · p.10 #10 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


Matthew Runkel wrote:
Whenever there is a "democratization" of professional expertise that allows more sellers to offer a "credible" version of a service offering, it's going lead to market segmentation, partly by revealing which clients were only paying standard professional rates because they had no cheaper alternative, and which ones understand the value proposition underpinning the professional rates. Those in the first group only ever were clients of standard-rate professionals by default.


Precisely. Possibly best illustrated by the web design industry. Early on people made tens of thousands of dollar making simple sites. Now a site can be assembled by the user in minutes from free sites with sophisticated templates.
However, large firms still spend tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars on industrial strength web design.



It seems to me that a big problem for converting people in the "lowball" segment is that much of this work (weddings, particularly) is a one-time purchase memorializing unrepeatable events. Couples pay what they pay, and if they regret it it's too late to hire a professional. If they get something they find acceptable, they don't know how much better the professional product might have been, and even if they do it's still too late to choose differently.

Again, I agree. My looooong experience in this world has convinced me that it is a foolish use of scarce resources to try to "educate" the occasional or low ball client. The ROI is vanishingly small. One can find a far higher return on even the simple offering of passport photos or photography of art work for contest submission. The product is easily understodd and the importance of quality is easily grasped. No long sales pitches. No waiting hopefully for the client to agree.
Both are customers that are needing professional work of minimal expertise but best offered in a studio. Those two services alone can float a studio and provide a stable stream of low paying customers that make profitable work for the pro but is a higher bar for the hobbyist.

The working pro needs a steady stream of revenue. The hobbyist doesn't. The easiest are those like the above examples because a client does not want to pay too much yet the hassle for a hobbyist often exceeds their enthusiasm.
A tip: don't shoot local passport photos. Here in the US I shoot only foreign passport photos as I can get 6 times the rate of a US passport because the foreign nationals are concerned about getting the job done correctly the first time.





Jul 24, 2017 at 04:23 PM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



sonofjesse2010
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.10 #11 · p.10 #11 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


Around here, I see more amateurs and people giving away work so why pay( I admit I have done it for a local sports team as an act of good will on occasion), but it never resulted in paid work and trying to get paid for future gigs, yielded nothing.

If phones and Kit cameras are this good in 2017. How many photographers will able to make a living in 2027? In some from photography as a business will exist. However, I don't' think the "changes" of this business is even close to over.




Jul 31, 2017 at 02:04 AM
glort
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #12 · p.10 #12 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


sonofjesse2010 wrote:
If phones and Kit cameras are this good in 2017. How many photographers will able to make a living in 2027? In some from photography as a business will exist. However, I don't' think the "changes" of this business is even close to over.



The people making real money in photography right now are doing what so many pissed and moaned at me for doing a few years back.
Volume/ Production line work.

Things like Fun parks, attractions, tourist spots etc are all set up to pump people through and make Decent memories fast. These companies are making large fortunes and largely will be immune to the Kit cam / phone/ amateur interference. They often set up their own backgrounds or have an area where no one else can shoot. This follows a rule I was given some time back in doing sports and events work, Take pictures they can't.

When I was doing this years ago the typical high horse sheeple artists were going on about production line and not being art and all the usual ignorant shit the artistic but starving like to complain about. Everything I see now in the game that is making the big bucks is doing this.
There are all sorts of ways to get the pics to the clients, to pay for them and stream line the process a long way beyond "Log onto the site and see what you want to buy". Tourist parks have roving shooters, there are streamlined sales areas right at the exits and fixed camera's shooting people on rides, with animals, against themed backdrops etc.

I can't see this ever really being eroded. I was talking to a friend on the weekend, a girl at uni shooting part time at a local attraction and she shared some numbers with me that do at what could only fairly be called a B grade attraction. It's simply a reasonably niece market that is going to be down the list of what people want to see and do when they come here or go for a day out. The photo sales is a BIG part of their income and one they are wary and understandably protective of.

Clearly the production work is something most shooters would turn their noses up at but it was certainly profitable for me in the relatively pissant way I was doing it compared to these now international companies that are getting in on every attraction world wide.
Photography is my business not my indulgence so I'm happy to shoot whatever makes me a buck. I think all those that think like everyone else that taking the prettiest pictures out there is going to get them through might have to start considering their priorities.

Making art to satisfy their egos or making money to keep their families fed.
The idea of doing great pics and going for the best work which many seem to not get is the same idea every other shooter has is going to fall real flat on it's arse before long.



Jul 31, 2017 at 09:32 AM
Mikehit
Online
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.10 #13 · p.10 #13 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


I don't know if this BBC link works outside the UK but this guy is doing well taking what I consider to be average photos. I have certainly seen better - a lot better.
But he has hit a vein somehow and is being well paid if the reports are right....and I am guessing he will do well until the competition moves in, or the 'fashion' subsides, or he turns 'mainstream' increasing quality with the same techniques as everyone else.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-us-canada-40756945/the-22-year-old-making-lucrative-food-porn

http://www.dcfoodporn.com/home




Jul 31, 2017 at 11:15 AM
glort
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #14 · p.10 #14 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


Mikehit wrote:
but this guy is doing well taking what I consider to be average photos. I have certainly seen better - a lot better.


Thing is, the guy gets it better than most shooters.
It's not about taking the best photos as people constantly go on and on and on about.
It's giving people what they want.

There are a couple of things that surprise me with this. The first is he even uses a camera. Phones haven't taken over completely yet.
Secondly, they pay him for it. I guess the difference with this is it's not the photos people are actually paying him for, it's the advertising and promotion. The pics are incidental and a means to an end, to get them mentioned on his blog/page.

The guy is not selling pics, he's selling advertising and Promotion.

The difference between this amateur and those that would call themselves professionals or Photographers etc is that the shooters would be carrying on about equipment and editing and making perfect pictures. This guy does something nice but recognises where the real market is and fills it.

Going back tot he amateurs eroding the market pissing match, I wouldn't say this guy is.
If a very good food shooter walked into these places and said I'll shoot your entire menu for $1000, they wouldn't be interested. It's not pictures they want, it's customers coming through the door. This guy, quite possibly by accident, realises that and has capitalised on it. A food shooter would be going on about the right body and lens and bringing in 5 lights and a ton of crap and going on about colour balance, if the detail was pin point sharp and all the other crap we are all well aware of.

This guy cuts to the chase and earns the bucks. He's not eroding the " Professional" market because there wasn't one. He created it. I believe as said that it will be short term. Soon as he gets exposure like from this article, 1000 others will all start doing the same thing. It will become common place, less effective and there will be a new rush of blood to the head and shiny objects to take the attention away.

BUT......
The guy is supposedly going to earn $75K while studying at uni working part time and getting all the free feeds and kickbacks he can handle. No doubt he'll move on and understanding what he has done here, go do it bigger and better somewhere else. That would also make it difficult for a mainstream shooter. One can't rely on fads or being able to come up with some off the wall idea to base their long term living off and convince the bank to give them a home loan or something.

I'm always droning on about the importance of business skills and here is yet another example.
This has NOTHING to do with photography, that's just a means to an end. What it does have to do with is business and initiative.

For those that would say well this is what we are talking about, just move on and do something else if your wedding/ portrait/ sports/ Commercial markets are drying up, it's not that easy.
How many here 25 or over would have EVER thought of this?
Not me that's for sure.
I had a lash at approaching restaurants to shoot their food years ago and got no where. Seeing The idea is not something I could rip off now either. Can you imagine a 50+ yo going to these places saying Ill put your food pics on twitter and bring you all these people?.
Yeah sure Grandpa, order or fk off old man.

Good on the kid.
He's not fking the industry by undercutting, giving away, bastardising, giving the trade a bad name, taking work from full timers or any of the others things many here refuse to accept and acknowledge that has been spoken about. Hes also not trying to take the greatest pic ever taken. He understands his market and is capitalising on it.

Probably go on to a lot bigger and better things than a lot of us here ever will.



Jul 31, 2017 at 12:41 PM
Mikehit
Online
• •
Upload & Sell: On
p.10 #15 · p.10 #15 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


glort wrote:

It's giving people what they want...The guy is not selling pics, he's selling advertising and Promotion.... Hes also not trying to take the greatest pic ever taken. He understands his market and is capitalising on it.


I agree with your whole post, glort, espeically the clips above.
One of the more sanctimonous criticisms I have heard about amateurs or johnny-come-lately neophytes is how they have not done the hard yards to earn 'professional' status.

I really hope this guy has recognised the mine he has uncovered and, as you say, goes on to better things. Yes, I am sure he will do the hard yards to follow it up and keep on giving them what they want (not what he thinks they want).



Jul 31, 2017 at 12:57 PM
thenoilif
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #16 · p.10 #16 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


glort wrote:
Thing is, the guy gets it better than most shooters.
It's not about taking the best photos as people constantly go on and on and on about.
It's giving people what they want.

There are a couple of things that surprise me with this. The first is he even uses a camera. Phones haven't taken over completely yet.
Secondly, they pay him for it. I guess the difference with this is it's not the photos people are actually paying him for, it's the advertising and promotion. The pics are incidental and a means to an end, to get them mentioned on
...Show more

You're really reaching to prove a point.

Personally, I don't think this guy represents your whole 'photographers need to be used cars salesmen' theory.

This guy is more of a representation of a talented/skilled artist in the area of commercial photography. After reading the article, I see that he majors in communications/marketing but also has a history of being a creative. I think some forget that one of the foundations of art is communicating ideas/emotions.

Thing is, he is one of many that can be found in most major cities from LA to Toyko. I see posts from people like him all the time especially when a new restaurant opens or some food pop-up is promoting a new item. Some stand out more than others either because they have a unique talent, had more opportunities (he used his parent cc to pay for the food he shot during his start up days) and/or know the right people.

As far as eroding the market, I would say that he perfectly represents one part of the demographic that has taken away from the average 'shooter' that you speak of, especially the traditional commercial pros. Commerical food photography isn't anything new and it also has its fair share of pro 'shooters' with their expensive gear and technical by the book approach. In fact, most are just wedding/event photographers who have diversified their customer base. Most have come to rely on firms to get work mostly because of reliability but guys like this take business away from the marketing firms which in turn hits the 'pro-photographer'.

Now we have so many people who are creatives first with current technologies allowing them to get close enough in the technical side to produce their visions. We also have an entire generation who have had to learn how to self-promote themselves through imagery and are constantly trying their hands as entrepreneurial creatives.

Some are like this guy, young, more creatively talented, and with parents who are willing to allow their children to express themselves and explore their creative skills. If you look at his bio you'll see how much he's been able to dabble in at just 22.








Aug 01, 2017 at 10:09 AM
glort
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #17 · p.10 #17 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


thenoilif wrote:
Personally, I don't think this guy represents your whole 'photographers need to be used cars salesmen' theory.


That's because i have repeatedly stated that particular notion is the theroy of the ignorant, uneducated and those in denial about what business and sales skills are.
This "Used car salesman" defense crap is those that are ignorant and fearful they are lacking the skills needed to justify themselves. The very supposition itself show those making the comparison do not have the first clue what they are talking about.

This guy is more of a representation of a talented/skilled artist in the area of commercial photography. After reading the article, I see that he majors in communications/marketing but also has a history of being a creative. I think some forget that one of the foundations of art is communicating ideas/emotions.

Right. So we are back to the " It's because he's a great photographer he's successful" ideal is it?
Like I said, how many top food shooters you think could walk into these places and be paid to take pics of food?
I'll tell you, NONE!
Surely you can't be that biased to see that the guy is relying on marketing to do what he is and the photography is incidental.
If you can't or more likley, Don't want to see that, not much you are going to be able to learn to advance any photo career you may want to seek.

Thing is, he is one of many that can be found in most major cities from LA to Toyko. I see posts from people like him all the time especially when a new restaurant opens or some food pop-up is promoting a new item. Some stand out more than others either because they have a unique talent, had more opportunities (he used his parent cc to pay for the food he shot during his start up days) and/or know the right people.

Clearly this guys Skill is to drive people into the restaurants he shoots with. If others are out there doing the same. Fantastic. I'll gaurantee that these guys are not getting invited in for free just because they may or may not take awesome pics. I like the guys pics myself. They ahve a style I like as technically imperfect as they may or may not be. His photo skills alone are NOT the reason he's accomplishing what he is however.

As for using his parents CC to pay for the food when he started out, WTF has that got to do with anything? I bet he takes them out all the time now and they are well in front. Frankly that comment sounds a lot like jealousy to me although it may be the whole " Have to be a starving artist for years to earn your stripes" type position as well.

Putting money into something to get it started so it can return a profit later is called an "INVESTMENT". It's an idea that's been around a while now. Some parents invest in their kids by putting their University fees on their CC for instance. Nothing wrong with that by any means and seems to be a popular way for some parents to spend their money.

I Started out with nothing and was totally self sufficient in what I put into my gear but I don't see that makes me better than those that didn't move out of home when they were 12 and did have family to help them along. I'm starting a business with my daughter and I fully intend to put my now deep pockets to work to help her anyway I can. I know that only goes so far and the rest will be up to her. I'll give her a start but she will be running a business and if she can;t make it float on it's own, I won't be propping it up I can tell you.
I'll give her a push to get her started but it's going to be up to her skill and initiative which money can't buy to drive the thing and get it to where she wants to go.

As far as eroding the market, I would say that he perfectly represents one part of the demographic that has taken away from the average 'shooter' that you speak of, especially the traditional commercial pros.

Well maybe where you live Commercial food shooters go knocking on the doors of these little places and they give them work but I have had a good amount to do with the restaurant game and I have yet to even hear of that where I am. As I said, I tried it once and couldn't get a foot in anywhere. I'm no miracle shooter but I'm pretty confident i'm good enough with my sales skills if not a camera to have cracked one client if there was a market there and I tried from a burger joint to a top class place and everything in between.
Here the only people that use commercial shooters are magazines and cookbooks. Commercial shooters don't go round little places looking and certainly not being paid to shoot their menu.

Commerical food photography isn't anything new and it also has its fair share of pro 'shooters' with their expensive gear and technical by the book approach. In fact, most are just wedding/event photographers who have diversified their customer base.


Again, I don't know where you are and it wouldn't matter but I can tell you for a certainty, whee I am, that statement is absolute laughable crap.
Commercial food photography here is anything BUT wedding shooters moonlighting. It's a HIGHLY specialised niche of the market and although I have never been directly involved, I know enough about it to know that these guys are highly specialized and not the wedding event shooters you describe.

Sounds to me like your definition and idea of a commercial food shooter is this new wave type ideal rather than the guys really in the industry proper.


Most have come to rely on firms to get work mostly because of reliability but guys like this take business away from the marketing firms which in turn hits the 'pro-photographer'.

Again, not here.
Simply not a remotely valid reflection of the real world where I am.

Now we have so many people who are creatives first with current technologies allowing them to get close enough in the technical side to produce their visions. We also have an entire generation who have had to learn how to self-promote themselves through imagery and are constantly trying their hands as entrepreneurial creatives.

And we have a lot of high horse, internet educated twats that believe that doing the same as everyone else, being the best shooter out there and only going for the top end market is the only way you can be a successful shooter in it's true form. Ha!
These are the clowns that when I suggest to them that learning basic business skills will be an asset to their careers spout ignorant and laughable rubbish like " They don't want to be used car salesmen". Their ignorance and pride prevents them from seeing the truth of the matter because all they want to do is read camera reviews and repeat flawed forum theories and mentalities rather than educate themselves in a new and helpful skillset.

Some are like this guy, young, more creatively talented, and with parents who are willing to allow their children to express themselves and explore their creative skills. If you look at his bio you'll see how much he's been able to dabble in at just 22.

You just won't accept that entrepreneurial skills have anything to do with what he is doing and how he is doing it will you?
It's all because he's such a shit hot shooter right?
And again with the resentment of parents that will throw a buck their kids way to try and get them ahead in life? My Father never gave me the time of day when I was young and starting out but that's not what I'm going to do with my daughter and again, anyone is jealous, tough.
Maybe you are more resentful that the guy didn't piss the money or the parents faith up the wall but made a real good return on the money they gave him.



Aug 01, 2017 at 02:30 PM
c.d.embrey
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #18 · p.10 #18 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


"Close only counts in horseshoes and handgrenades."

In the modern advertising world, close doesn't count—ya gotta hit the target. And Justin Schuble's Instagram food photos hit the target. He didn't invent the genre—what I'm having for lunch has been a staple of social media photography from the beginning. And his image quality won't get him a Bon Appetit Magazine cover. But it will sell a lot of food, because Justin Schuble is a problem-solver NOT a photographer. In the real world, perfect ideas are much more important (and much harder to find), than technically perfect photos.

BTW have you seen the 2017 Lincoln print campaign shot by Annie Leibovitz? Think Different sells.





Aug 01, 2017 at 07:36 PM
thenoilif
Offline

Upload & Sell: Off
p.10 #19 · p.10 #19 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


c.d.embrey wrote:
"Close only counts in horseshoes and handgrenades."

In the modern advertising world, close doesn't count—ya gotta hit the target. And Justin Schuble's Instagram food photos hit the target. He didn't invent the genre—what I'm having for lunch has been a staple of social media photography from the beginning. And his image quality won't get him a Bon Appetit Magazine cover. But it will sell a lot of food, because Justin Schuble is a problem-solver NOT a photographer. In the real world, perfect ideas are much more important (and much harder to find), than technically perfect photos.

BTW have you seen the
...Show more

I think you and Glort and few others on here are demonstrating a very specific mindset when it comes to photography.

Like any art form, photography is a medium to express oneself. It's not only about the technical side which includes technique and technology. Given that Justin has chosen a camera to express himself, then I would say that qualifies him as a photographer, and since he's making money, he is a professional one at that. If he switches gears and chooses to become a videographer then we can call him that as well. Or like myself, and other photographers, writers, designers, he may eventually become a creative director for a firm or open his own.

There have been many, many great painters, writers, sculptures, musicians, etc. that have been great artists and not because they were able to paint everything in perfect proportion or because they were expert guitar players. No, they were/are great because they have the ability to communicate an idea(s) that touched people in a certain way. Some rely heavily on the basic fundamentals of what draws people in, we often assign Pop to their art.

As in this video, the key element that was mentioned is that the greats tend to be great because they are amazing story-tellers. And in the commercial photography industry (advertising) the most financially successful are the ones that can communicate a specific message to people.

To say that they are salespeople cheapens creativity IMOP. It's more organic than that, like Justin's photos. What he and others have done is to look at the trends in food photography and then try to do something new, not for the sake of
selling something but for the sake of sharing and to garner attention to themselves and in today's social media driven world that sort of attention can earn you some money. His IG started out like most IGs, posting photos for likes. He just happened to want to share what he saw through photos. How is this not a basis of photography?

For the record, food photography as a profession has went from magazine (typically a creative director will hire a photographer based either on their work or on their ability to capture the CDs vision time and time again), to online magazines (same as print) to websites (same as magazines), to blogs (this is where the entrapreneurs start emerging) to social media (mix of hired and entrepreneurs) to IG (mostly entrepreneurs).

Magazines like Bon Appetit focus more on images that are technically proficient because they want more 'sophisticated' looking photos. Once Blogs started emerging we started to see food photography become more comforty and many of the people who run these were foodies (from the food network generation) with some creative skills but they weren't technically trained chefs so their food lacked the sophistication of the likes of Bon Appetit. so they became more reliant on creative compositions of the food in order to make it look delicious in a positively gluttonous way.

Next came the lifestyle bloggers. Young people with money and nothing to do but be creative and also wanted to separate themselves from the confines of a fb news feed. They chose to document their dining, shopping, and traveling through photos and words. Most of these people used either P&S cameras but some also had DSLRs. Typically the best ones had the latter.

Then everything shifted. Smartphones with good quality cameras and IG emerged. Blogs died out and the bloggers jumped to IG to share their lives. It has resulted in a race for who can take the best photographs, and when I say best I mean the most liked.

At around the time of the foodie blogs, product based businesses saw these sites as a new frontier for advertising thus adware. Restaurants also saw the marketing potential with the lifestyle bloggers and started offering free meals to the people who had a strong following. This carried over into social media and eventually IG. Now we have many people who make a living off of the 'likes' they receive from their photos. The thing is, this evolution is because of photography and how people consume content.

Smartphones are now our main source of media consumption and photos are the most popular media because its the simplest and most efficient way to convey a message. The emphasis on creative photography (not technical) is more than it has ever been because there is so much out there that you need to stand out, especially if you're doing things on your own.

The thing is, this is just one aspect of the photography industry. The promotional side of things, and these days its often rooted in self- promotion with commercial photography often being a bi-product.

But, all of these skills that are being learned from this are creating an over-abundance of 'shooters' that are more creatively skilled at composition than the 'pros' who focused more on mastering technique. Unfortunately, there is just too much of that for free on the internet these days. Obviously, the guys who have been making a living off of their technical prowess are hurting now, and I do sympathize with you, my dad worked in the auto industry for years to only lose his job due to automation. He was taught that you choose a skill and you stick with it and by doing so you'll be successful but unfortunately, that's not how things are these days in many professions. You need to be more diversified in your skillset than ever, and more creative than ever.








Aug 02, 2017 at 03:09 AM
Two23
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.10 #20 · p.10 #20 · Hobby photographers eroding value of professional work?


glort wrote:
I'm always droning on about the importance of business skills and here is yet another example.
This has NOTHING to do with photography, that's just a means to an end. What it does have to do with is business and initiative.



I've been diving into the history of the early photographers (19th C.) in my region, collecting their photos and reading up on their life stories. The one thing that is most clear is that all of them were excellent self promoters that knew how to use a camera well enough to get recognizable photos most of the time. I see this today as well--I'm thinking of the many internet photography bloggers now. And Peter Lik etc. for that matter. A service like photography is mostly about marketing and selling people.


Kent in SD




Aug 02, 2017 at 03:50 AM
1       2       3              9      
10
       11       end






FM Forums | Pro Digital Corner | Join Upload & Sell

1       2       3              9      
10
       11       end
    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username     Reset password