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Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest
  
 
monkeyoink
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


Hey all,

I'm planning my honeymoon to the Pacific Northwest in November. We're planning a two week road trip starting in Oregon and making our way up to washington and possibly Vancouver. We're big hiking people and I'd love to be able to photograph our trip. The gear that I'm thinking about bringing: 1 or 2 5D3, 16-35 f4, Sigma 35Art, and Canon 135L, I might pick up a Nifty Fifty to fill the gap in between the 35 and 135. Those who have been there or live there, would this setup be adequate?

Thanks!



Jun 18, 2017 at 03:40 PM
kwilliam8
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


Make sure you bring your rain gear. November is almost always the worst month of the year in western Washington, as far as weather goes. It will be rainy, windy, and stormy. There will likely be fresh snow in the mountains. If you don't mind the weather (and take care with your camera gear), then it can make for some nice images. As far as gear, I would take a 16-35mm f4 lens hiking, and have the range from 24mm to 200mm covered for general touring. Good luck!
Keith W.



Jun 18, 2017 at 04:54 PM
monkeyoink
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


Thanks Keith! I personally love the stormy weather


Jun 19, 2017 at 12:13 PM
Abbott Schindl
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


Try to find copies of "Photographing Oregon" and "Photographing Washington", both by Greg Vaughn. They're both excellent and should give you some location ideas. I live in Central Oregon and visit Vancouver (WA) and Seattle fairly regularly. Keith gave you some excellent advice. It can snow both in the coastal and mountain areas starting as early as October, and it will almost certainly be chilly, wet and probably overcast in most places in November. You might check out winter possibilities in the central parts of both states, as well as coastal and mountain areas.

For the coastal side, research Olympic National Park and the Oregon Coast starting around Florence and going north. The Oregon Coast offers some wonderful opps in Winter, although maybe not as much hiking/camping as you are looking for.

Abbott



Jun 19, 2017 at 01:10 PM
camboman
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


Agree with Keith - expect storms in November. Probably the best place to photograph them on the Oregon coast is Shore Acres State Park.

https://www.google.com/search?q=shore+acres+state+park+storm+photos&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwimk77i_cnUAhUKz2MKHSt2CdMQsAQIIQ&biw=1271&bih=1142

Your kit sounds good to me, maybe add a longer lens than your 135 for when you can't zoom with your feet!



Jun 19, 2017 at 01:12 PM
monkeyoink
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


camboman wrote:
Agree with Keith - expect storms in November. Probably the best place to photograph them on the Oregon coast is Shore Acres State Park.

https://www.google.com/search?q=shore+acres+state+park+storm+photos&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwimk77i_cnUAhUKz2MKHSt2CdMQsAQIIQ&biw=1271&bih=1142

Your kit sounds good to me, maybe add a longer lens than your 135 for when you can't zoom with your feet!


Thanks for the suggestion! The only concern I have with a lens longer than my 135 is the weight and I don't really want to rent for two weeks.



Jun 19, 2017 at 01:46 PM
kwilliam8
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


Abbott Schindl wrote:
Try to find copies of "Photographing Oregon" and "Photographing Washington", both by Greg Vaughn. They're both excellent and should give you some location ideas. I live in Central Oregon and visit Vancouver (WA) and Seattle fairly regularly. Keith gave you some excellent advice. It can snow both in the coastal and mountain areas starting as early as October, and it will almost certainly be chilly, wet and probably overcast in most places in November. You might check out winter possibilities in the central parts of both states, as well as coastal and mountain areas.

For the coastal side, research Olympic
...Show more

Abbott's suggestions for the two books are spot on. I have both, and they really are excellent!

---------------------------------------------

camboman wrote:
Agree with Keith - expect storms in November. Probably the best place to photograph them on the Oregon coast is Shore Acres State Park.

https://www.google.com/search?q=shore+acres+state+park+storm+photos&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwimk77i_cnUAhUKz2MKHSt2CdMQsAQIIQ&biw=1271&bih=1142

Your kit sounds good to me, maybe add a longer lens than your 135 for when you can't zoom with your feet!


Camboman's suggestion about Shore Acres State Park is a great one. I have only been there in the spring, and it was really beautiful and a great spot for sunsets. However, I have seen images taken there during winter storms (which includes November, I would think), and they are truly spectacular!

Keith W.



Jun 19, 2017 at 06:55 PM
 

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dbehrens
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


If there is a storm brewing Shore Acres, Seal Rocks and Bandon are especially good.


Jun 20, 2017 at 01:45 AM
Tim Knutson
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


Hello, its your honeymoon. Bring a cellphone. Do you want to stay married


Jun 20, 2017 at 02:54 AM
GroovyGeek
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


Tim Knutson wrote:
Hello, its your honeymoon. Bring a cellphone. Do you want to stay married


My sentiment exactly. Unless your bride is also a photographer forget about gear and just bring along a cell phone and an external battery bank. If you are on Android and rooted Manual Camera will capture raw (DNG) files on some phone models, those are surprisingly good.

This is a cell phone pic from not too long ago
http://www.lghtbx.com/u/groovygeek/0BxMbtrAZYEMod1JWQklGS04zUjg/0BxMbtrAZYEMoMU1CMWVqVUhLUGM
and so is this
http://www.lghtbx.com/u/groovygeek/0BxMbtrAZYEMoaVhtUnFzOTdjeGs/0BxMbtrAZYEMoNVM0SGxSbkZBYXc


As for a "kit", may I suggest this
https://www.amazon.com/Anker-Bluetooth-Highly-Extendable-Compact-Handheld/dp/B01DIUNIQG

I am celebrating a 30th anniversary in a few years, take it from a pro who has the battle scars to show - leave the dSLR at home.

And if you truly want to jeopardize your marriage on Day 1, head for the rainforest and the waterfalls on the gloomy days; the coast when there is a winter storm. The mountains are likely to be a total loss this time of year. As of 5 years ago Cape Kiwanda used to be an awsome place to catch humongous waves crashing into the shore, but I hear that now the place is infested with tourists and they have put up some serious fencing. On a crappy day you are likely to be one of the few brave souls, it may still be possible to jump the fence.

P.S. Now that I think of this, planning a honeymoon in PNW in November sounds like you are a glutton for punishment, so you might as well just go for it :-). Your kit seems to be tilted on the wide side. If this was a trly landscape trip I would suggest 16-35/4 + 70-200/4 or 100-500. There is not much room for "normal" lenses in landscapes, unless you are shooting intimate landscapes or doing focal length blending. The other thing missing from your kit is a full set of NDs - you will need them around the waterfalls/streams and for wave action.



Jun 20, 2017 at 03:48 AM
jdc562
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


camboman wrote:
Agree with Keith - expect storms in November. Probably the best place to photograph them on the Oregon coast is Shore Acres State Park.

https://www.google.com/search?q=shore+acres+state+park+storm+photos&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwimk77i_cnUAhUKz2MKHSt2CdMQsAQIIQ&biw=1271&bih=1142 ...


Yes! Long ago, before the State Park enlarged, I lived very near Shore Acres. The photos at the link don't do justice to the huge, awe-striking, waves at Shore Acres. When the waves bash against the sloped rock faces of the shore, the breaking water roars way up into the air. These are long-period waves that come from storms far away across the Pacific--they cannot be necessarily predicted from local weather conditions, no matter how dire those are. But those big waves are more frequent in November. The coast around Shore Acres--Cape Arago and Sunset Bay-- are also very nice. as are the old, mossy, spruce-cedar coastal forests.

So, if you want beautiful hiking weather for your honeymoon, why not get married in September? It's my favorite month in Oregon. There are big golden areas then. It's warm and dry, sometimes. The naturally open, park-like, serpentine rock landscapes near the Illinois River and Rogue River (southern Oregon) are warm and and beautiful, including under the September full moon. How romantic can you get Hike to a site of an old homesteader's cabin in the wilderness there and enjoy the old types of apples from the gnarled ancient trees--just a couple, leave some for others.

As for photo capabilities, your opportunities will range from beautiful, little, fall mushrooms growing on moss to long beaches and the Cascade mountains. The shores with wave-bashed rock formations are great set-ups for time exposures, as are the streams flowing over rocky courses. But are you really going to hike around with all those lenses? And change them in misty, dripping conditions? And, as the others pointed out, aren't there other priorities for a honeymoon?

Not to be trollish, but I agree with the others about the bad weather in November: it is often dark, damp, cold, and gloomy. The weather won't necessarily provide stormy drama for your photos; just bone-penetrating, aching, damp, gray, lightless, cold. For clothes, forget anything like clammy cotton. Dress for damp cold: fleece, other polyester, and wool. Layers, not just a parka.

But, then again, maybe, in your situation, a desperate need for cuddling will be a good thing....




Jun 20, 2017 at 05:24 AM
OregonSun
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


I would recommend southern Oregon in November. Crater Lake, the Rogue River (which has a trail along it's 30 mile wilderness section), south coast (Port Oroford to Brookings, throw in Bandon if you don't mind the golf resort/touristy thing). Lots of hiking, warmer weather, much fewer people, more public land.

Also try to get over to the east side of the Cascades. Not as much rain, totally different ecosystem. Look at Fort Rock, Paulina Peak, Cascade Lakes highway, Smith Rock, Painted Hills, etc.

North Umpqua and McKenzie highways are awesome for hiking (60 and 30 mile riverside trails, respectively, plus many others), hot springs, and waterfalls.

If possible, try to keep your schedule flexible and decide where to go based on the weather you're looking for.

As far as gear, you'll need wide for waterfalls, but aside from that it just depends on your style/preference.

Have fun!



Jun 21, 2017 at 01:09 AM
GroovyGeek
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Tips on photographing the Pacific Northwest


OregonSun wrote:
snip


Gotta love the black sense of humor in this guy's username :-)



Jun 22, 2017 at 06:07 AM







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