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Judging focus in post...
  
 
leethecam
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Judging focus in post...


I'm intrigued...

At what magnification do people here judge focus when doing post production.

I should qualify that by limiting the type of photography to events / music / wedding / parties etc.

Also - let's assume we're checking on a standard resolution monitor rather than a retina or 4K type where the rules are a little different in my experience.

I have a knack of beating myself up by checking at 100% but I hear that many other photographers check at 50% It's particularly frustrating when I'm shooting @ISO 1600/3200 and f2.8 with moving subjects.

(I'm using Capture One on a 1920x1200 monitor).

So, is it just me or are we all just as crazy...?



May 13, 2017 at 03:54 PM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Judging focus in post...


Always at 100%, and in C1, that's an easy double-click in the image with the hand tool, which immediately pops you to 1:1.


May 13, 2017 at 06:05 PM
leethecam
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Judging focus in post...


You know, after using C-1 for a couple of years, I've never found that feature. I've either struggled with the zoom tool or had a separate "focus" window on my 2nd screen.

You sir, have improved my workflow by a country mile...!



May 13, 2017 at 06:33 PM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Judging focus in post...


Glad that helped. I think I discovered it by accident fifteen years ago or so.


May 13, 2017 at 07:56 PM
 

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mikethevilla
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Judging focus in post...


This is actually why I won't use anything less than a "retina" monitor for photo processing. I prefer to edit on my 4k monitor, but on the road I use a 15" retina MBP (which is nearly 3000x2000).

If it looks sharp full screen on either of those, it's more than sharp enough for me. Saves me the trouble of zooming in on each photo to check focus.



May 13, 2017 at 09:34 PM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Judging focus in post...


Well, if you can't resolve the pixels on the screen with your eyes, you won't be able to judge image sharpness critically. And if you have clients making ultra large prints like I often do, I need to see them at 1:1 on a screen where I can just barely see the screen pixels - with reading glasses.


May 13, 2017 at 09:50 PM
leethecam
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Judging focus in post...


mikethevilla wrote:
This is actually why I won't use anything less than a "retina" monitor for photo processing. I prefer to edit on my 4k monitor, but on the road I use a 15" retina MBP (which is nearly 3000x2000).

If it looks sharp full screen on either of those, it's more than sharp enough for me. Saves me the trouble of zooming in on each photo to check focus.


Yes it's funny - as we migrate slowly to high resolution screens with approaching print resolution per screen inch, we'll be judging sharpness like the old days of film - by judging at the actual size of the image rather than zooming in on screen.



May 13, 2017 at 10:24 PM
Mikehit
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Judging focus in post...


I will assess at 50% because in general if it looks sharp at 50% then sharpening will make it totally acceptable. This thing about checking at 50% was when images were 8-10MP. They are now anything up to 50MP which on most computer screens is an image up to 8 feet across. If you intend to print large, then OK but otherwise....?

I think this is why you need to understand what the image is being used for, and that means speaking to a client if relevant. This will serve 2 purposes - firstly to know how to judge images when you are processing them, and secondly you should sharpen to suit the output anyway.

And if the image is for a client, whether the sharpness is acceptable is not for the photographer to decide, especially at events where the occasion is often more important than the absolute sharpness of an image.




May 16, 2017 at 08:44 AM







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