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dgdg
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Tide pools


It's been a when since I've been out northwest exploring the tide pools. I was point and shoot back then - gasp.
I plan on a macro lens and a cheap tripod.
At minimum I think I'll tape a clear plastic bag over the camera. Thinking on something more waterproof for accidental sprays but outex is about $400 for a kit.
Any tips?
Are the pools too shallow for semi immersion shots?



May 07, 2017 at 11:16 AM
elkhornsun
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Tide pools


A polarizing filter is all you should need. Tide pools can be very dangerous. The rocks with their wet plant growth are usually very slippery and sneaker waves can come in without warning and take you out to sea.

Between the low low tide and the next high tide there will be a slack period and that is when I would want to arrive at an area. The lowest low tides are around a half moon and in the winter months when the earth is closer to the sun.



May 07, 2017 at 06:19 PM
jdc562
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Tide pools


dgdg wrote:
It's been a when since I've been out northwest exploring the tide pools. I was point and shoot back then - gasp.
I plan on a macro lens and a cheap tripod.
At minimum I think I'll tape a clear plastic bag over the camera. ...Any tips?
Are the pools too shallow for semi immersion shots?


---------------------------------------------

elkhornsun wrote:
A polarizing filter is all you should need. Tide pools can be very dangerous. The rocks with their wet plant growth are usually very slippery and sneaker waves can come in without warning and take you out to sea.

Between the low low tide and the next high tide there will be a slack period and that is when I would want to arrive at an area. The lowest low tides are around a half moon and in the winter months when the earth is closer to the sun.


I've used plastic bag protection, but they also make the camera harder to hold and operate; however they are good for stowage in something like a front-mount "fanny" (belly?) pack that's well padded for protection if you fall. If you are tidepooling close enough to the waves to need protection from spray, you are probably too close to the waves for your own safety. As Elkhornsun warns, watch out for sudden, extra-big, unpredictable waves. Don't go to high risk places--wave exposed areas like open coasts and rocky points--and be constantly vigilant in protected areas.

I would not go by moon phases to schedule my trip to the intertidal zone; instead, use the tide tables/graphs. The lowest low tides (and highest highs) occur around the full and new moons--when the sun and moon are aligned. Tide amplitude and daylight occurrence vary seasonally. The lowest lows let you go out to some of the most interesting places. To maximize your shore time during extreme lows, you should plan to arrive as the tide is receding. However, beware that these tides will also rise very fast; I've watched people get trapped on outer rocks by these fast rising tides. To visualize the tidal amplitudes by time of day and rates of rise and fall, go online for graphical tide predictions with shading to show night and day. This includes seeing the slower-rising, but not so low, tides (neap tides) that Elkhornsun describes around the half moons.

Regarding your question, tidepools come in all depths. On the right shores, you can find ones deep enough for "semi immersion shots." Remember barnacles and other sharp things can easily puncture plastic bags. A view box is also cumbersome to lug out without a helper. Elkhornsun is absolutely right about slippery rocks, which includes unstable loose rocks. Watch your steps while also looking ahead for good paths. A hiking pole really helps your stability, but is one more thing to carry. Using a (short) camera strap should go without saying. Also, a sturdy lens hood will help protect your lens if you go sprawling. Don't even think about changing lenses in the wet, salty, slippery intertidal zone.


Edited on May 08, 2017 at 05:02 AM · View previous versions



May 07, 2017 at 09:06 PM
Henry W
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Tide pools


Look for tide tables. Low - Minus tides are your best answer.


May 08, 2017 at 01:12 AM
GroovyGeek
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Tide pools


Henry W wrote:
Look for tide tables. Low - Minus tides are your best answer.


There's an app for that...I use http://appcrawlr.com/android/tide-prediction but there are many others that will do. If you will be shooting tide pools forget about the baggie thing, it is nothing more than a giant hassle. If you are truly shooting macro you are over static water, well separated from the water break. Your bigger problem is the cheap tripod :-)



May 09, 2017 at 12:50 AM
 

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dgdg
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Tide pools


GroovyGeek wrote:
There's an app for that...I use http://appcrawlr.com/android/tide-prediction but there are many others that will do. If you will be shooting tide pools forget about the baggie thing, it is nothing more than a giant hassle. If you are truly shooting macro you are over static water, well separated from the water break. Your bigger problem is the cheap tripod :-)



Thanks.
So you think a waterproof housing is not needed?

I definitely don't want to be lugging my gitzo around there with the family. For macro I found this little tripod that should do the job.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01MSAEZN8/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=23W3KDXZ0Q77Z&coliid=IHI9S67E9YXK6&psc=1

I was there probably 20 years ago. Not sure which beach, but we simply tromped around the sand to various amazing little aquariums and exposed rocks with the starfish. No one else was there. We did not feel the need to venture out where the water was deeper or risk of waves. I'll be with my family. We have fun but we are not going to be big risk takers with waves.

David




May 09, 2017 at 01:01 PM
GroovyGeek
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Tide pools


Everyone is different. I have never had found the need to do the baggie thing in reasonable weather,


May 10, 2017 at 03:56 AM
Dustin Gent
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Tide pools


check the tides, as mentioned. i only used a dry bag i cut a hole in for the lens (14-24), and only then did i use it most of the time in the gorge. i never had a camera fail, and i grew up in oregon


May 10, 2017 at 04:50 PM
alatoo60
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Tide pools


Get yourself a waterproof camera, such as Olympus Tough 4, its about $200 factory refurbished. It shoots in RAW, and has excellent macro and underwater modes.
Your concern around tide pools should be either slipping on a seaweed, or being caught by the tidal wave.

Sasha.



Jun 07, 2017 at 07:50 AM







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