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JMcDonald84
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


Hey guys,

I just picked up a Sony a7ii w/28-70mm lenses to start my adventure!

My wife owns a wedding company so she has been at me forever to get into photography so I can shoot some weddings.

Im super excited....Im still learning all the types of lenses and which situations to use them for. My buddy has a a7rii and he is going to sell me a 50mm 1.4....so I'll have these 2 lenses to get me going.

Is there any other lenses I should get when I can.....? I have been eyeing up that G 85mm 1.4....but I dont have that kind of money to blow on a lenses right now lol.

Excited to be here and look forward to learning as much as I can.



Mar 20, 2017 at 10:52 PM
seanj
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


What do you like to shoot beyond weddings? Or, are you only looking at doing weddings?


Mar 20, 2017 at 10:55 PM
AGeoJO
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


I would stick to those 2 new lenses first and get your feet wet (read: get to know your camera and lenses plus general photography) first before spending more money on other lenses. Yes, you should ask your wife to show you the ropes. No offense, OK?

Is your wife using a Sony FE system for her wedding business? It would make a lot sense for the two of you to use the same system rather than 2 different ones for obvious reasons. Good luck!



Mar 20, 2017 at 10:59 PM
JMcDonald84
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


seanj wrote:
What do you like to shoot beyond weddings? Or, are you only looking at doing weddings?


I love city scape...long exposure night shots, sunsets, sunrises....probably wont d a whole lot of portraits unless its my kids.

In the end...business use will be mainly weddings, engagments, beach shoots...I live on the beach in Navarre FL, so everything mainly is beach area.



AGeoJO wrote:
I would stick to those 2 new lenses first and get your feet wet (read: get to know your camera and lenses plus general photography) first before spending more money on other lenses. Yes, you should ask your wife to show you the ropes. No offense, OK?

Is your wife using a Sony FE system for her wedding business? It would make a lot sense for the two of you to use the same system rather than 2 different ones for obvious reasons. Good luck!


My wife does not do photography....she is a wedding planner/event coordinator. So i will be doing my own seperate side business.




Mar 20, 2017 at 11:07 PM
Nexed
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


Having recently gotten an A7II, and being primarily into landscapes, long exposure night shots, etc., I would next invest in a wide angle lens that has a wide aperture, which can serve very well for landscape stopped down, but is deisgned to do well wide open when you want to capture the stars, etc.

There's no reason for this to be particularly expensive. The Sony 28mm f/2 is pretty good, and pretty cheap, but if you want to go wider, there are a host of options, including some new manual focus ultrawides that are very well priced.

But I agree with AGeoJO that you should at least spend a couple of months with what you have so you get a clearer idea of what you need.



Mar 21, 2017 at 04:48 AM
JMcDonald84
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


Nexed wrote:
Having recently gotten an A7II, and being primarily into landscapes, long exposure night shots, etc., I would next invest in a wide angle lens that has a wide aperture, which can serve very well for landscape stopped down, but is deisgned to do well wide open when you want to capture the stars, etc.

There's no reason for this to be particularly expensive. The Sony 28mm f/2 is pretty good, and pretty cheap, but if you want to go wider, there are a host of options, including some new manual focus ultrawides that are very well priced.

But I agree with AGeoJO
...Show more

Awesome. Thanks for the info! I really appreciate everyones input. When you say "Stopping Down"...for instance...you said invest in a lenses that has a "wide" aperture....so I need like variable one...?

Example...3.6-5.6....? or just like f/4 and manually adjust the aperture more open....?

Sorry if it seems like a stupid question...like I said..i'm still learning. Thanks again.



Mar 21, 2017 at 12:37 PM
Faulta
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!




JMcDonald84 wrote:
Awesome. Thanks for the info! I really appreciate everyones input. When you say "Stopping Down"...for instance...you said invest in a lenses that has a "wide" aperture....so I need like variable one...?

Example...3.6-5.6....? or just like f/4 and manually adjust the aperture more open....?

Sorry if it seems like a stupid question...like I said..i'm still learning. Thanks again.


For landscape use, you're​ using apertures from F8 to F16, since most lenses maximum apertures are F4 or wider (F2, F1.4 etc) you have to stop the lens down to that aperture. You need the wide aperture to create shallow depth of field or for handheld shooting in the dark.
But there is one exception in landscape shooting and that's anything that involves stars. Stars are moving faster than you might think and any exposure that's longer than 500s/focal length (for example with a 20mm lens, it's 25seconds) will create star trails. To avoid them you have to stay below that critical shutter speed. When it's quite dark outside, F 8 won't give you enough light and you would need to use iso 25000 or higher to get a proper exposure. But of course you don't want to use those isos and so you have to open the lens up. If the maximum aperture is F2 instead of F4, that allows you to use iso 1600 instead of iso 6400 with the same exposure time and will give you much cleaner results therefore.
In photography it's always a compromise. With sufficient light, you're using iso 100 and the aperture which the lens performs best, it's around F8 for most lenses. Also you want to have a large depth of field to have everything in focus. From there different situations require changes in aperture. Like I mentioned, if it's getting darker you might want to open the lens up if stars are involved. Also you might want to step the lens further down in bright daylight to get nicer sunstars. So shooting right into the sun, F16 could bring you nicer results. But be aware, a F16 shot will be less sharp because of diffraction limitations. So you're trading a little sharpness for better sunstars. It's your choice. Best would be to just go out and play around with the settings, comparing results and seeing what changes.



Mar 21, 2017 at 01:33 PM
JMcDonald84
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


Faulta wrote:
For landscape use, you're​ using apertures from F8 to F16, since most lenses maximum apertures are F4 or wider (F2, F1.4 etc) you have to stop the lens down to that aperture. You need the wide aperture to create shallow depth of field or for handheld shooting in the dark.
But there is one exception in landscape shooting and that's anything that involves stars. Stars are moving faster than you might think and any exposure that's longer than 500s/focal length (for example with a 20mm lens, it's 25seconds) will create star trails. To avoid them you have to stay below
...Show more

Yea, I am going to start playing around with different situations and photos to get a feel for the camera and the settings. Thanks for all the info...a lot to digest lol. But very useful so i can just come back to this thread and take notes and what not.

Thanks again




Mar 21, 2017 at 02:12 PM
Nexed
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


JMcDonald84 wrote:
Awesome. Thanks for the info! I really appreciate everyones input. When you say "Stopping Down"...for instance...you said invest in a lenses that has a "wide" aperture....so I need like variable one...?

99.99% of lenses allow you to vary the aperture. Typically, zoom lenses have a variable widest aperture, which is why, for instance, your 28-70 says 3.5-5.6. At 28mm, you can open the aperture up to f/3.5, but at 70mm, you can open up to f/5.6 only.

Prime lenses, like the 28mm I discussed, usually only mention their widest aperture (f/2 in this case), but can be "stopped down" quite a bit, usually f/22, though that smallest aperture value can be different.

As the OP noted, not all apertures are equally sharp. In many lenses, the widest aperture will be somewhat softer, especially at the corners of the image. This doesn't matter for stuff like portraits, since you expect those regions to be out of focus, but it will matter for landscapes. Further, you also want more of the image in focus, which also increases with smaller apertures. Which is why you pick something like f/8. Many wide primes show excellent frame-wide sharpness at f/5.6, or f/8 and maintain it for a few more stops further down. Once you know what that value is for a given lens, you can play around to get a better idea what works for what situation.

Example...3.6-5.6....? or just like f/4 and manually adjust the aperture more open....?
An f/4 lens can be adjusted to lower values manually or automatically, depending on the type of lens. Newer lenses all allow the camera to control the aperture, so even the fully automatic modes can do so. Older manual focus lenses usually require you to turn an aperture ring on the lens to change aperture. The end result will be the same, though.

Sorry if it seems like a stupid question...like I said..i'm still learning. Thanks again.

No worries. There are no stupid questions, in the beginning. The worst thing you can do is not ask and make a faulty assumption, so feel free to ask anything!



Mar 21, 2017 at 03:02 PM
JMcDonald84
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


Thank you!

Do i need to be using a lens hood.....? I can't seem to find any for the Sony alpha....



Mar 21, 2017 at 03:45 PM
 

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CMYK Designs
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


More important than any particular lens or f-stop is to learn the basics. Study and learn composition, positioning of the subject and framing. Learn to use the rule of thirds and you'll be surprised how much better your photography will be. Bust most of all, learn how light strikes a subject. The use of times of day, cloudiness vs. bright sunlight, post-dawn and pre-dusk lighting, fill flash, and on and on...


Mar 21, 2017 at 03:47 PM
notherenow
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


If the 28-70 came with a hood, use it.

It will help with stray light and also protect the lens a bit.

It is maybe not the BEST lens, especially for landscapes but I think it will be just fine for what you want for a while anyway.

Is the 50 1.4 the native FE lens? If so, that will be very nice indeed. If not, it will still be ok but I would advise getting the FE 55 1.8 Sony Zeiss (if not the FE 50 1.4) as the 55 can be found a lot less than advertised price and is a bargain.



Mar 23, 2017 at 02:42 AM
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


If I were you, I would get a good introduction to photography book that includes a progression of different assignments to help you learn to use your camera and get you working on some projects. This is the one I learned from originally, but I am sure you can find one that is just as good, if not better, and your local book store: https://www.amazon.com/Hedgecoes-Complete-Photography-Revised-Updated/dp/1402716532/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1490241203&sr=8-6&keywords=john+hedgecoe

Next, I would recommend waiting a while before you start doing weddings. It will (likely) take a very large outlay on equipment to be able to cover them like most professionals do. But enjoy the hobby, and if you love it, then maybe that will be a good reason to turn it into a profession!

Just starting out, I do think it is beneficial to have a prime. I think a used FE 55/1.8 is a good recommendation. Or, if you wanted, you could experiment by adapting some manual focus lenses. You won't retain autofocus, but they are much cheaper and so you can experiment and find focal lengths you like before taking plunges on expensive equipment like the 85/1.4.



Mar 23, 2017 at 03:58 AM
JMcDonald84
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


notherenow wrote:
If the 28-70 came with a hood, use it.

It will help with stray light and also protect the lens a bit.

It is maybe not the BEST lens, especially for landscapes but I think it will be just fine for what you want for a while anyway.

Is the 50 1.4 the native FE lens? If so, that will be very nice indeed. If not, it will still be ok but I would advise getting the FE 55 1.8 Sony Zeiss (if not the FE 50 1.4) as the 55 can be found a lot less than advertised price and
...Show more

The lenses nmy buddy is going to sell me is the Sony FE Zeiss 55 f1.8

yea the 28-70 i feel is ok....I just got it yesterday...I was only able to play around with it in the living room...which isnt the best lighting...

For instance...I was fooling around in aperture priority mode and i thought the camera was broke lol...it would take so long for it to shutter and the picstures were blurry!! I was like man!! But then my buddy who has a a7rii told me my ISO was to low...and it was on 100 lol...so i bumped it up to 6400 and the picture came out great.

I was kind of suprised there is no built in flash...but i guess i wouldnt use it at events and stuff anyway..I would use the bigger ones.



Mar 23, 2017 at 01:57 PM
JMcDonald84
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


austinschutz wrote:
If I were you, I would get a good introduction to photography book that includes a progression of different assignments to help you learn to use your camera and get you working on some projects. This is the one I learned from originally, but I am sure you can find one that is just as good, if not better, and your local book store: https://www.amazon.com/Hedgecoes-Complete-Photography-Revised-Updated/dp/1402716532/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1490241203&sr=8-6&keywords=john+hedgecoe

Next, I would recommend waiting a while before you start doing weddings. It will (likely) take a very large outlay on equipment to be able to cover them like most professionals do. But enjoy the hobby,
...Show more

Thats a great idea to get a book with assignments. I never thought of that. Good looking out! I appreciate it.

Yea im not going to be doing any weddings any time soon. I need to learn this camera and get better with it. I was eyeing up that 85 1.4 the other day...as soon as I get some more money i will probably splurge on it.




Mar 23, 2017 at 01:59 PM
Nexed
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


JMcDonald84 wrote:
yea the 28-70 i feel is ok....I just got it yesterday...I was only able to play around with it in the living room...which isnt the best lighting...

For instance...I was fooling around in aperture priority mode and i thought the camera was broke lol...it would take so long for it to shutter and the picstures were blurry!! I was like man!! But then my buddy who has a a7rii told me my ISO was to low...and it was on 100 lol...so i bumped it up to 6400 and the picture came out great.

You don't necessarily have to bump up to 6400. With Aperture Priority, I would also set to auto-ISO, where you can give the camera a range of ISOs to choose from based on its automatic metering calculations. 6400 is usable but the A7II doesn't do as well at high ISOs as other Sony FF cameras. For home and people shots, I usually use a 100-3200 ISO range. Then, if I feel I can afford a slower shutter and want a cleaner image, I use the Exposure Compensation dial that's on top to make the camera choose a lower ISO.



Mar 23, 2017 at 02:53 PM
JMcDonald84
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


Nexed wrote:
You don't necessarily have to bump up to 6400. With Aperture Priority, I would also set to auto-ISO, where you can give the camera a range of ISOs to choose from based on its automatic metering calculations. 6400 is usable but the A7II doesn't do as well at high ISOs as other Sony FF cameras. For home and people shots, I usually use a 100-3200 ISO range. Then, if I feel I can afford a slower shutter and want a cleaner image, I use the Exposure Compensation dial that's on top to make the camera choose a lower ISO.


Hm....When I had it on Aperture Priority and the ISO was set to 100 in my living room...it would take forever to shutter...it was crazy...then the picture was super blurry...idk...maybe I had some other setting all jacked up...? When I get home today from work, im going to mess around some more for sure.

Also, when I went to adjust the aperture it would change the shutter at the same time....? It was saying 1", etc....but when i switched to 6400 ISO...it went back to fraction type... 1/64..etc...

Ive only had a couple hours to play around with it...I'm sure I had some crazy setting going on




Mar 23, 2017 at 05:24 PM
Nexed
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p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


JMcDonald84 wrote:
Hm....When I had it on Aperture Priority and the ISO was set to 100 in my living room...it would take forever to shutter...it was crazy...then the picture was super blurry...idk...maybe I had some other setting all jacked up...? When I get home today from work, im going to mess around some more for sure.

No, that is expected behavior. I don't know what aperture you set it on, but this lens doesn't open all that wide, so with an ISO of 100, the camera has to slow the shutter speed down very low to capture enough light for a good exposure. The consequence of that is the blurring, since you'd have to use a tripod for the camera to not move.

Also, when I went to adjust the aperture it would change the shutter at the same time....?
Yes, this is what happens in aperture priority. The shutter speed changes to accommodate a proper exposure when you change the aperture. If you want all these values to be fully under your control you need to use the Manual mode, where everything is in your control and the camera won't change these settings.

It was saying 1", etc....but when i switched to 6400 ISO...it went back to fraction type... 1/64..etc...
Yes. I highly recommend you read up on the exposure triangle, and how your camera will make adjustments to aperture/shutter/ISO based on it. A 1 second (1") shutter isn't uncommon in dark scenes if you force the camera to use a low ISO setting.

I've only had a couple hours to play around with it...I'm sure I had some crazy setting going on


No, this is entirely normal behavior. 1" or 1.64 are not the result of different settings in the camera. This is what you'll always get depending on the lighting and the values you choose for aperture and ISO.

To start with, I highly recommend you read up, while letting your camera use it's automatic modes to take pictures. Then see what the camera chooses as the values for these settings in Auto modes. That gives you a good idea of what exposure values you need for different lighting. Then you can start building on that.



Mar 23, 2017 at 07:11 PM
notherenow
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p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · Newish to photography and new to Sony cameras!


The 28-70 kit lens and the Sony Zeiss 55 1.8 are my only two native lenses and I happily used them with the original A7 and still with the A7s.

The A7ii and those two lenses will do fine at a wedding for a few shots at least to start (many working pro wedding photographers use less).

I would certainly suggest getting at least a hot shoe flash (some are quite small).

I don't use flash a lot but would certainly at a wedding a fair bit.
There are some nice small flashes available and I love the little HVL-F20m. Small and easy to use (lies flat on camera when not used and you simply raise it up to turn it on). It is quite cheap though there are cheaper flashes and more powerful ones will be handy if doing this seriously later but would make a decent start anyway. If getting a Sony flash be careful that it is an E mount version (not A mount).

Flash will help a bit with the kit lens at 70mm especially and can also be a bonus with the 55 1.8.

I like to use the 28-70 in aperture priority at 5.6.

One thing to check, both your lenses can use either stop down focusing or wide open.
Check the camera to see if "Live View Display" is on or off. That can make a difference in focus speed in lower light.

If you get the hood with each lens, use them both always.

Take it slow at your wife's events and (it should be) a fun ride.

Good luck.





Mar 23, 2017 at 07:11 PM







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