Home · Register · Software · Software · Join Upload & Sell

Moderated by: Fred Miranda
Username   Password

  New fredmiranda.com Mobile Site
  New Feature: SMS Notification alert
  New Feature: Buy & Sell Watchlist
  

FM Forums | Trip Location Advice & Meet-ups | Join Upload & Sell

  

Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?
  
 
kaitlyn2004
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


With my upcoming trip to Australia and New Zealand, I'll be shooting around the ocean and sand a LOT - far far more than I ever have before. And it'll be an almost-daily occurrence.

What can I do so that I don't ruin some of my expensive and new gear? Naturally I'm going to want to get close AND low for some of my shots, I don't want things getting wet but there will be spray for sure. And wind for sand.

Between my tripod, my camera, and various lenses... what do I need to be doing to take extra precautions/care to ensure I'm not ruining everything?



Jan 09, 2017 at 03:37 AM
Fred Miranda
Offline
Admin
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


I would just add a high quality UV filter to your lens(es).

This thread will be moved to the "Trip Location Advice & Meet-ups" forum.



Jan 09, 2017 at 03:39 AM
jdc562
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


You are correct to protect your equipment: salt spray is lethal to camera electronics and corrosive to metals. Sea salts are hygroscopic (absorbing moisture from the air), which allows corrosion and electrical problems to continue even when you go to a dry place.

I used to work around the ocean shore and did this a lot: I made my own camera "raincoats" out of thin clear plastic bags. Use just one bag. One option is to use a larger bag, with the bag opening pointing down to admit your hands inside the bag. Another is to use a smaller bag. Totally seal the bag and operate the camera from outside the bag.

1. In either case, put the single bag over the whole camera, lens and all. As Fred suggested, have a UV filter on the the lens, but start with the filter a little loose.
2. Then use a very thin rubber band or strong thread to tie the bag onto the front of the lens, working the band or thread into the slot between the loose filter and the lens. (The thin type of waxed dental floss works well as thread.)
3. Do the same to tie the bag around the eye-piece of the view finder. Most eye-pieces have a groove around the outside for mounting accessories.
4. When the tying is tight, carefully use a sharp blade or fine tiny scissors to cut away the plastic that is covering the lens filter and covering the eye piece.
5. Then tighten the filter all the way.

With a modern camera, put all your settings on "auto." Then you may only need to actuate the shutter button, which can be done through the thin plastic bag. This allows the entire bag to remain fully sealed.
The set up is cheap and easy to replace--disposable.
There are commercially available raincoats, too. But make sure they are adequate, especially to protect the junction where the lens attaches to the camera body.

You can do similar protection for the joints of your tripod. Check the manufacturer to see if you can also rinse your tripod with distilled water. Then dry well. Check online sources for instructions on disassembling your tripod for cleaning.



Jan 09, 2017 at 04:52 AM
kaitlyn2004
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


jdc562 wrote:
You are correct to protect your equipment: salt spray is lethal to camera electronics and corrosive to metals. Sea salts are hygroscopic (absorbing moisture from the air), which allows corrosion and electrical problems to continue even when you go to a dry place.

I used to work around the ocean shore and did this a lot: I made my own camera "raincoats" out of thin clear plastic bags. Use just one bag. One option is to use a larger bag, with the bag opening pointing down to admit your hands inside the bag. Another is to use a smaller bag.
...Show more

Eek sounds so intense

I did something like this when I went into a slot canyon in Arizona (blowing sand) but this was a 1 or 2 day occurrence... here I'll be doing this for weeks on end. Hmmm



Jan 09, 2017 at 03:59 PM
jdc562
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


kaitlyn2004 wrote:
Eek sounds so intense

I did something like this when I went into a slot canyon in Arizona (blowing sand) but this was a 1 or 2 day occurrence... here I'll be doing this for weeks on end. Hmmm





Jan 09, 2017 at 07:17 PM
GroovyGeek
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


Use common sense, do nothing special unless there will be heavy spray. UV filters are particularly pointless. Used to have them on my lenses when I was starting out, but over time I have stopped using them. But if they make you feel more secure sure, go for it with the understanding that even the expensive ones cause significant flare when shooting in the sun and they do absolutely nothing to protect the parts that are most susceptible to water - the electronics. By way of example when shooting the Moeraki Boulders I was often up to my waist in water with the camera and lenses unprotected. A $.02 plastic bag secured with a rubber band around the lens barrel is all you need if you will actually be in the water. On the beach just pay attention to the waves. I would be more worried about what a and will do to the tripod legs, but even that is easily mitigated by keeping your first segment fully extended


Jan 10, 2017 at 05:01 AM
Tim Knutson
Offline
• • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


A little rust and patina is a badge of honor. Wear it with pride.

Just try not to fall in.



Jan 10, 2017 at 11:03 PM
chez
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


GroovyGeek wrote:
Use common sense, do nothing special unless there will be heavy spray. UV filters are particularly pointless. Used to have them on my lenses when I was starting out, but over time I have stopped using them. But if they make you feel more secure sure, go for it with the understanding that even the expensive ones cause significant flare when shooting in the sun and they do absolutely nothing to protect the parts that are most susceptible to water - the electronics. By way of example when shooting the Moeraki Boulders I was often up to my waist in
...Show more

I use UV filters whenever there is salt / sand spray. It's a lot easier cleaning a filter than your lens...and if you shoot along the coast when the wind is blowing, you'll be cleaning that filter or lens every 10 minutes or sooner. I usually have a couple of filters that I exchange when they get covered with spray so I can keep shooting when the light is nice.



Jan 11, 2017 at 12:22 AM
 

Search in Used Dept. 



Dustin Gent
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


i grew up in Oregon and shot along the coastline countless times. My manfrotto tripod lasted 9 hard years and the salt water finally did the joints in. I never did anything special for the camera or lens. Still have the same lens.

Salt water does suck when it gets on the lens (for shots), but is not hard to clean off. This just has been my experience.



Jan 11, 2017 at 05:54 PM
kaitlyn2004
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


Dustin Gent wrote:
i grew up in Oregon and shot along the coastline countless times. My manfrotto tripod lasted 9 hard years and the salt water finally did the joints in. I never did anything special for the camera or lens. Still have the same lens.

Salt water does suck when it gets on the lens (for shots), but is not hard to clean off. This just has been my experience.


Hmm did you do anything special for cleaning the camera or lens?



Jan 11, 2017 at 06:04 PM
chez
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


Dustin Gent wrote:
i grew up in Oregon and shot along the coastline countless times. My manfrotto tripod lasted 9 hard years and the salt water finally did the joints in. I never did anything special for the camera or lens. Still have the same lens.

Salt water does suck when it gets on the lens (for shots), but is not hard to clean off. This just has been my experience.


Really depends on the beach you are shooting. Some beaches you get fine sand blowing in with the salt spray. If you are not very careful when cleaning the lens, the sand will leave scratches on the lens surface. Rocky beaches are usually fine, but I found some beaches in Oregon like Canon beach can have a lot of sand blowing around with the salt spray.

I don't use the UV filters all the time, but there are conditions where they are very handy.



Jan 11, 2017 at 11:47 PM
chez
Offline
• • • • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


kaitlyn2004 wrote:
Hmm did you do anything special for cleaning the camera or lens?


I use a lens cleaner fluid and those "ShamWow towels" to wipe the lens clean. When I get back from a shoot, I clean the surface of all my cameras and lenses that were used with a damp towel to remove the salt spray.

If you are in a position where you might get hit by a wave, it's best to have a rain jacket on your camera / lens. One wave will usually kill the camera and / or lens sooner or later.



Jan 11, 2017 at 11:49 PM
kaitlyn2004
Offline
• •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


chez wrote:
I use a lens cleaner fluid and those "ShamWow towels" to wipe the lens clean. When I get back from a shoot, I clean the surface of all my cameras and lenses that were used with a damp towel to remove the salt spray.

If you are in a position where you might get hit by a wave, it's best to have a rain jacket on your camera / lens. One wave will usually kill the camera and / or lens sooner or later.


I do have this which I have used in rain and last time I was out whale watching
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/891383-REG/ruggard_rc_p18_18_plastic_rain_cover.html



Jan 12, 2017 at 02:13 AM
Dustin Gent
Offline
• • • • •
Upload & Sell: Off
p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


i use the zeiss lens wipes. Got a 250 pack (maybe it was a 500pack?) from amazon for like $14. That is what i use - and a giottos blower - to blow off the water


Jan 12, 2017 at 06:54 PM
elkhornsun
Offline
• • • •
Upload & Sell: On
p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Shooting around saltwater, sand regularly?


Yours is the one situation where I will use a protective UV filter on my lenses to protect the front element from windblown sand and salt spray. Good idea to take a soft towel that you can use to wipe down your gear. I also make use of a shoulder bag with a large flap (LowePro Stealth Reporter series) to keep the outside on the outside - worst would be a backpack. As much as possible I will change lenses with the camera inside the bag or in a vehicle. Shielding the camera with your body and or windbreaker can also help to protect it.

Always be on the lookout for sneaker waves and learn to count waves as different sets will come in at different heights and some will push waves much further up the beach. It is worth taking the 15-20 minutes to determine the maximum wave size and distance up the beach to protect yourself and your equipment.

In many places the wind is strongest in the afternoon and those are usually when the lighting is not that good anyway. There are also going to be more sheltered areas out of the wind and so there will be less sand blowing around.



Jan 21, 2017 at 10:38 PM







FM Forums | Trip Location Advice & Meet-ups | Join Upload & Sell

    
 

You are not logged in. Login or Register

Username   Password    Reset password