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Shooting the SuperMoon
  
 
bobmcg
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Shooting the SuperMoon


I will be in Washington, DC Sunday and Monday nights and would appreciate any tips on shooting the SuperMoon. Interesting locations and settings. Thanks in advance.


Nov 12, 2016 at 01:57 PM
JohnC
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Shooting the SuperMoon


The classic shot is from Netherlands Carillion in Arlington looking across the Potomac at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument and the Capitol. You will have to check photographer's ephemera or similar if moonrise will be in your shot.


Nov 12, 2016 at 02:53 PM
Mataz426
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Shooting the SuperMoon


looney 11 rule


Nov 12, 2016 at 03:14 PM
bobmcg
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Shooting the SuperMoon


Thanks. I'm pretty sure it will based on some reviews this morning. What focal length would you recommend? Also, for those who use a Nikon D810, what's the max iso you feel comfortable with?



Nov 12, 2016 at 03:19 PM
ckcarr
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Shooting the SuperMoon



http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1458575/0#13796377



Nov 12, 2016 at 03:59 PM
dsjtecserv
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Shooting the SuperMoon


From the Netherlands Carillon/Iwo Jima Memorial area, the moon will rise well to the north of the classic alignment of the Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument, and Capitol.

http://app.photoephemeris.com/?ll=38.888285,-77.068669¢er=38.8896,-77.0444&dt=20161113105300-0500&z=15&spn=0.02,0.06

It will rise just to the south of the White House, though you don't have a clear view of the WH from that point so that isn't much consolation. If you moved south into Arlington Cemetery, you could align the moon with one of the monuments, but not all three, and I'm not sure if there is a location with a clear view anyway.

I'm not aware of other land-based and public locations that have a clear view in this direction with any of the distinctive WDC foreground elements. Without that, its just a picture of the moon, and there's nothing special about its slightly larger than average size. In order to emphasize the large size, you need to be far away for your foreground subject of interest. So while you could choose a spot on the Mall or around the Tidal Basin to frame a monument with the moon in the frame, the moon wouldn't look particularly "super".

The classic monument shot is done during months when the moon rise aligns with the view of the three icons in a row, and it really doesn't matter if is a "supermoon". So I don't think there is any special opportunity to do anything special in Washington DC with this month's perigee.

That said, there may be water-based viewpoints that could be interest, if you have that option. Or you may look around for views that give a long distance perspective to a natural object or a building that is not necessarily unique to DC, but still interesting; lighthouses are often used for these shots. I checked the view from Great Falls but nothing that would work jumps out at me. But others may have some ideas.

I'd also suggest using the link above to use Photographer's Ephemeris to scout around to possible alignments, though you may not be able to tell whether there is a clear view or not.

Dave



Nov 12, 2016 at 04:22 PM
 

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dsjtecserv
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Shooting the SuperMoon


bobmcg wrote:
Thanks. I'm pretty sure it will based on some reviews this morning. What focal length would you recommend? Also, for those who use a Nikon D810, what's the max iso you feel comfortable with?


First, focal length is of secondary concern. The key to a shot showing the moon large relative to a terrestrial object is to be a LONG way away from the terrestrial object. Then you simply use a focal length that will frame the object and the moon in the way you want, or use the longest you have and crop later.

Second, the best of these shots are done at a time that is not particularly challenging for ISO. Ideally you want the terrestrial object to still be illuminated by the direct sunset light or by twilight. That way the exposure for the moon and the terrestrial object are more or less the same, so you don't blow out the moon nor just silhouette the object. Properly timed, your settings will be similar to what you would use for a normal sunset (in the direction away from the sun), with an emphasis on shorter exposure time to minimize moon movement. The aperture used need not be extremely small, since at middling apertures both the distant object and the moon would be within hyperfocal distance. You may raise the ISO a few notches to keep the shutter time down, but it need not get into really high ISO.

That's why Craig's link above recommends shooting moons the evening before full. You will have more light on the earth at the time that moon rises. However, this month the moon will rise on the night of the full moon (Sunday evening) just before sunset, so this is a fairly unusual case where the same night might still be a good choice. If you are in the area tonight (Saturday) you could scout out locations and still have a nearly full moon with plenty of light on the foreground, and still have Sunday as an option. On Monday the moon will rise about 35 minutes after sunset so that's not the best opportunity.

Dave



Nov 12, 2016 at 04:44 PM
bobmcg
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Shooting the SuperMoon


Thanks all.


Nov 12, 2016 at 06:27 PM
walts.photo
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Shooting the SuperMoon


I'm going to try it tomorrow morning, probably with a water reflection (not many famous monuments in Vermont). Just can't decide if I'll use a D500 or D810 with a 70-200 2.8. I prefer the D500 tilt screen but the D810 will have better DR, so it's a toss-up.

Anyway, good luck on the shoot in DC.



Nov 13, 2016 at 05:05 PM
GroovyGeek
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Shooting the SuperMoon


dsjtecserv wrote:
First, focal length is of secondary concern. The key to a shot showing the moon large relative to a terrestrial object is to be a LONG way away from the terrestrial object. Then you simply use a focal length that will frame the object and the moon in the way you want, or use the longest you have and crop later.


Alas many (maybe most) shots of the moon over terrestrial objects are heavily doctored, with the landscape shot with a WA lens, the moon with a tele, and then the two composited together. For example, the common shot of this type in San Diego is from a pier on Coronado Island looking towards downtown, here is one example that Google comes up with:

https://photos.smugmug.com/San-Diego/i-S4FJCQ5/0/L/13212312354_d7224895e5_o-L.jpg

The cityscape itself is a SWA shot, maybe even 14mm or an aggressive pano at longer focal lengths. The moon in this image is at least a 200mm shot.



Nov 15, 2016 at 09:17 AM
dsjtecserv
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Shooting the SuperMoon


Well I don't know, but if this is a pano from a great distance away, using a long focal length to narrow the field of view of each shot, then it is plausible that this is is not "doctored" n the sense of an enlarged moon having been pasted into the shot. The relationship of the size of the moon and the size of the buildings is determined by the distance from which it was shot.

From Google Maps and TPE, I think this was shot from Bayview Park on Coronado, and the building in front of the moon is the Grand Hyatt. If that's the case, the distance is about 3/4 mile. So it is plausible that the moon could appear that large relative to the buildings. But there is a more serious problem: from that location the azimuth to the Hyatt is about 44 degrees. I don't know if the moon has ever risen that far north. So you may be right: the photographer may have corrected nature's failure to have the moon rise in the desired direction, and taken the liberty of enlarging it a bit in the process.

But in principle there isn't any reason that the moon can't be photographed very large in relation to foreground objects, if you can just get far enough way.

Dave



Nov 15, 2016 at 02:21 PM







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