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Archive 2016 · Correct Colors Using P800
  
 
StarNut
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Correct Colors Using P800


Hi,

I print out of Photoshop CS5. I use the printer profile for my printer and the paper I'm using. My monitor is well color-calibrated. I use sRGB in Photoshop, and have Photoshop manage colors in "color handling." For "rendering intent," I use Relative Colorimetric.

The prints are slightly off in color and brightness. A bit of research indicates that this is normal.

I'm thinking that printing small, low quality will allow me to get things exactly right, then I can print as large as I want. This should save ink.

Will this work? Is there a better way?

Thanks.

Mark



Nov 10, 2016 at 05:16 PM
dmcphoto
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Correct Colors Using P800


sRGB is a very small color space and your printer is capable of printing colors well beyond it. Typically the ProPhoto RGB space or the smaller Adobe 1998 RGB space is used for editing. Many printers can exceed Adobe RGB in some minimal areas. ProPhoto is bigger than needed for the end result but the idea is to minimize the accumulation of mathematical errors during editing when multiple or extreme adjustments are used. Also, in a small color space when you hit the edge you can't go beyond it and clipping of one or more color channels will occur. When clipping occurs colors block up in extreme cases and details are lost in less extreme cases.

Photoshop is able to soft proof images when soft proofing is set up and turned on. Soft proofing uses the paper profile to simulate the final result on your monitor without actually printing it. Photoshop also has a "Gamut Warning" that you can turn on that will color out of gamut areas gray (or any other color you pick). Gamut warning should always be on along with soft proofing when your intent is printing the image with the absolute best results. You will probably notice that different adjustments are needed to optimize the look of the soft proofed image versus the image in the normal (not soft proofed) view. That's the whole idea. Ink on paper needs soft proofing because it behaves unlike a monitor.

Good luck!




Nov 10, 2016 at 06:22 PM
Peter Figen
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Correct Colors Using P800


This has nothing to do with sRGB. sRGB is a fine space for general purposes and it is not the reason your prints are off. If anything, using sRGB actually increases the chance of a screen to print match. The problem here is either in the monitor calibration or the quality of the printer profile - or both - or some combination of both. And then you do have to account for print viewing conditions, which can affect print perception.

I would ask about the specifics of the monitor calibration - brand and model of calibrator, software used, and all the various monitor calibration parameters. Let's see that first and then go to the next step.



Nov 10, 2016 at 09:11 PM
StarNut
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Correct Colors Using P800


Thanks, Peter.

I have a Dell U2713H (wide-gamut) monitor.

I calibrate it as described here, using a i1 Display Pro:
https://photographylife.com/how-to-calibrate-dell-wide-gamut-monitors.

This has resulted in my .jpg conversions looking exactly like the image looks in Photoshop, when looked at in a color-managed browser.

Mark



Nov 11, 2016 at 01:46 PM
 

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chez
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Correct Colors Using P800


Do a printer head check...maybe you have a partially plugged head causing colour issues.


Nov 11, 2016 at 02:23 PM
charlyw
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Correct Colors Using P800


dmcphoto wrote:
Photoshop is able to soft proof images when soft proofing is set up and turned on. Soft proofing uses the paper profile to simulate the final result on your monitor without actually printing it. Photoshop also has a "Gamut Warning" that you can turn on that will color out of gamut areas gray (or any other color you pick). Gamut warning should always be on along with soft proofing when your intent is printing the image with the absolute best results. You will probably notice that different adjustments are needed to optimize the look of the soft proofed image versus
...Show more

I can only concur with that post! All other suggestions I have read thus far are not correct (one bordering on the ludicrous), this one is!



Nov 11, 2016 at 02:49 PM
chez
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Correct Colors Using P800


charlyw wrote:
I can only concur with that post! All other suggestions I have read thus far are not correct (one bordering on the ludicrous), this one is!


Soft proofing will only help if both your monitor is properly calibrated and the printer profile was made properly...and if the printer is working properly so a quick nozzle check will verify the printer.

Do you have other paper / profiles you can do a test with to see if you still have the same colour issues with a different paper?



Nov 11, 2016 at 02:59 PM







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