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Archive 2016 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?
  
 
cagester
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?


So i keep on asking these random questions that bother me and i always get very nice answers from photographers here so im gonna keep on going and asking questions

As the topic says, do Nikon lenses bring in more light?? I recently was covering a fashion show with a friend and he was using a Nikon D810 while i was using a Canon 5Dsr. I kept on complaining that i dont have enough ISO and i need to pump it beyond 1250 while he was around the 800 mark while still getting a better exposure on the back of his camera. I thought id put it to test the next day and both of us shot the same thing with the exact same settings and rather than watching it at the back of the camera (where the screen brightness could hamper ones opinion), i decided to download both files on a computer and still his image was atleast a stop brighter.

So just to recap, these were the settings used.
Nikon - D810 with a 70-200 2.8 - f/3.5, 1/250th ISO1250
Link for Nikon File

Canon - 5dsr with a 70-200 2.8 IS II - f/ 3.5, 1/250th ISO 1250
Link for Canon File

I would really appreciate if you guys could take the time to download the images (would take a sec) and compare them side by side.

Is there anything im doing wrong?? Why is the Nikon image brighter? Is it the lens or the body which creates this difference?

Looking forward to the responses . Let me know if anyone cant access the images so that i can figure out some other way to upload these images

Regards
Kashif



Nov 06, 2016 at 02:31 PM
Bruce Sawle
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?


In this case the Canon lens has a transmission of 3.3 vs 3.4 for the Nikon. So the canon lens technically should bring in more light. I'm more inclined to think this is related to the way canon and Nikon defined the ISO values or the difference in the way the camera meter and expose for a given scene. No one camera manufacturer ISO values are created equal.


Nov 06, 2016 at 02:44 PM
cagester
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?


Bruce Sawle wrote:
In this case the Canon lens has a transmission of 3.3 vs 3.4 for the Nikon. So the canon lens technically should bring in more light. I'm more inclined to think this is related to the way canon and Nikon defined the ISO values or the difference in the way the camera meter and expose for a given scene. No one camera manufacturer ISO values are created equal.


I guess it could be that the ISO values are different but this is significant, no? We arent really metering in this one as we are on manual so all settings are added manually



Nov 06, 2016 at 02:50 PM
neoshazam
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?


One of the few things DXO mark is good for is the T-stop / Transmission value of a lens, and potentially listing the more realistic ISO value of the camera. Photography has some leeway with their classifications so both the listed F stop of different lenses and the ISO of different cameras may each be off one way or another.


Nov 06, 2016 at 07:57 PM
nixland
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?


If I put the photos side by side, its less noticeable







Nov 06, 2016 at 11:49 PM
 

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nixland
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?



On second thought, the Nikon (first pic) looks darker.
Are you sure the first pic is the Nikon one?

nixland wrote:
If I put the photos side by side, its less noticeable




Nov 06, 2016 at 11:52 PM
Gregg Heckler
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?


In order to know for sure both cameras would have to be on the same metering mode and the exact same composition for something like this. For instance if the guy in the white shirt occupied any significant amount of space in the frame that could easily cause 2/3rds of a stop underexposure. So can a white runway. This is what I like to shoot runway stuff with a studio strobe, Maxilite reflector, and expose for the end of the runway. Anything farther back I'll bump up the exposure in post. Of course a lot depends on how much freedom you have to do this.







Nov 07, 2016 at 12:15 AM
Paul_K
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?


IMO it's due to how the camera manufacturer determines the ISO values
Of course they should always be the same no matter what brand, just like aperture values should
always express the same values on every lens.

But from what I've seen, and by comparing the technical details, from colleague,Canon using, catwalk shooters, Canon seems a bit optimistic in that regards

Also, due to the sensor used, Canon camera's can't take the kind of under exposure modern Nikon DSLR's can, resulting in e.g. chromatic noise, muddy colors etc.
Not just a personal opinion, but well documented in the several tests on the difference in shadow details recovery you can find on numerous serious review sites like DP review, Imaging Resource etc.

I have been shooting catwalk since the early 80's on film, e.g. on ISO Tri X pushed to ISO 800 http://www.pbase.com/paul_k/kabk_1987 or ISO 64 Kodak Y pushed to ISO 125 http://www.pbase.com/paul_k/puck__hans_1984 with only manual focus lenses as slow as the Nikkor 4.5/80-200 AiS and 4.5/300mm ED (wow, how did we do that back then)

Only started shooting catwalk seriously on digital with the D3 (the D2X really was horrible around/over ISO 800, the D1H somewhat better but limited for cropping purposes due to the small sensor)
Within the circle of professional catwalk I worked among, of course had plenty of many Canon shooting colleagues, and in the early digital days Canons undeniably better then Nikons.

That gap however was overcome with the D3
In particular with the 'midrange' professional bodies like D3 vs 1DIII, D3S vs 1DIV, D800 vs 5D2 ( remember Canon introduced the 1DX in Oct 2011, but released it as late as June 2012, with the 5DII, although released like the D3 in 2008m due to the outdated original 5D AF system not really up to shooting fast action like sports and catwalk), Nikons seemed, based on what I saw comparing my shots with those of Canon shooting collegues, to perform much better, especially when shooting under available light e.g. the D3 http://www.pbase.com/paul_k/20110617_kabk_den_haag or D800 http://www.pbase.com/paul_k/20150626_kabk
Although the newer 1DX/1DX2 and 5D3/4 have much improved in that regards, I personally (but I'm a Nikon shooter of course) don't think they have outperformed Nikon the D5 and D750

Don't like/prefer not to be shooting with flash, although if forced to do so, Nikon speedlight/flash metering has proven to work near flawless http://www.pbase.com/paul_k/20121124_mafb_adam (two off camera SB800's with PW TT5 triggers on separate lightstands , only possible because I was one of the three professional shooters present )

Don't believe in using studio units to shoot models at the end of the catwalk
Not only no professional catwalk shooter does that (image the several dozens of photographers in the shooting pit each setting up a studio flash when shooting the fashion weeks ), but shooting models only when they pose at the end of the catwalk fails to capture the mood/atmosphere in which the designer wants to present his clothes.

Otherwise why bother the expense of setting up a catwalk show, hring the venue, the lights, music, and the effort of training the models, and presenting te collection under the often not ideal stage light, ruffled due to the movements of the models, and with the improvised poses that come with a catwalk show, when shooting a model in a studio posed against a white background, styled into perfection, with every hand and finger in the right spot (as is the case in a studio shoot) will do a much better job of presenting the clothes

Also from a practical photography point of view, setting up studio lights (apart from the above mentioned problem if all shooters would do so) is way too bothersome to do so quickly before a show, while the size of a studio flash head will risk blocking the view of the video camera's, while it's much less reliable with regards to the, if any, TTL metering compared to dedicated speedlights



Nov 08, 2016 at 12:39 AM
Paul_K
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?


nixland wrote:
On second thought, the Nikon (first pic) looks darker.
Are you sure the first pic is the Nikon one?



No, the 1st shot is the Canon one, the 2nd the Nikon one (note the difference in the size of white shirt)



Nov 08, 2016 at 12:43 AM
Gregg Heckler
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Do Nikon Lenses bring in more light ?


"Don't believe in using studio units to shoot models at the end of the catwalk
Not only no professional catwalk shooter does that (image the several dozens of photographers in the shooting pit each setting up a studio flash when shooting the fashion weeks ), but shooting models only when they pose at the end of the catwalk fails to capture the mood/atmosphere in which the designer wants to present his clothes."

This is private show and I'm the only photographer so I can do what I want to, and it's all about shots of the girls for their families, not the clothing. I wouldn't use a strobe at a public event either.



Nov 13, 2016 at 03:50 AM







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