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Archive 2016 · A question about long lens technique.
  
 
some_film
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · A question about long lens technique.


With long lenses like the 400 and 500, I've seen more and more photographers doing this: They curl their fingers into the extended lens hood. Here's an example that showed up on Jamey Price's Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BLFFtQTgF8w/

I've seen so many photographers doing this now, it's obviously not an aberration. I wondered if it facilitated panning? When I tried it all I got was a little vignetting. I didn't think it helped stabilize the rig. Is anyone familiar with the technique and its purpose?



Oct 05, 2016 at 10:13 AM
CycledawgFL
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · A question about long lens technique.


Saw this technique being used by a few of the photographers last weekend at the Petite LeMans.


Oct 05, 2016 at 12:48 PM
finster1018
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · A question about long lens technique.


some_film wrote:
I've seen so many photographers doing this now, it's obviously not an aberration. I wondered if it facilitated panning? When I tried it all I got was a little vignetting. I didn't think it helped stabilize the rig. Is anyone familiar with the technique and its purpose?


My guess is that it is not so much about keeping his rig stable but to be in a position to swing his rig quickly particularly if he is panning his subject. With a large and heavy lens, and applying some easy science, the further his hand is away from the pivot point (monopod), allows him to swing the lens faster with less energy than if his hand were on the foot of the lens. His fingers are just allowing him to grip the lens better.



Oct 05, 2016 at 01:05 PM
FaulknersFoto
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · A question about long lens technique.


I have an older 400 2.8 and shoot horizontal most of the time. Because of this, I have screw tab, holding the lens hood on pointed down. I rest the palm of my hand on the foot, and wrap my forefinger around the screw tab as if it were a trigger. I feel slightly more stable this way, but more importantly, it helps me change direction relatively quickly without becoming too off balance.


Oct 05, 2016 at 02:47 PM
 

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finster1018
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · A question about long lens technique.


FaulknersFoto wrote:
I have an older 400 2.8 and shoot horizontal most of the time. Because of this, I have screw tab, holding the lens hood on pointed down. I rest the palm of my hand on the foot, and wrap my forefinger around the screw tab as if it were a trigger. I feel slightly more stable this way, but more importantly, it helps me change direction relatively quickly without becoming too off balance.


I also have an older 400 2.8...I think I will try that...usually I just rest my hand on top of the hood to move it, but I'll try using the screw as an anchor. Thank you for the tip!




Oct 05, 2016 at 03:01 PM
John Skinner
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · A question about long lens technique.


This is all about the lens you use, and how you feel comfortable using it.

I have a 300/400/200-400, and use varying techniques as the one pictured, to get the results needed for a type of shot, or sport.

Sometimes I rest my entire wrist/palm of the hood. Others I'm in there up to my 2nd knuckle. It's all personal preference, and just getting the shot



Oct 06, 2016 at 07:11 PM
cocodrillo
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · A question about long lens technique.


I use a 500mm a lot. I don't go as far as putting my fingers around the hood, but do normally have my hand up on the hood. It is about stability and maneuverability.


Oct 08, 2016 at 01:10 AM
chucklantz
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · A question about long lens technique.


I use that technique a lot on long, heavy lenses, especially if I have to hold it up for more than just a few seconds.

It's just simple leverage and load balance; ... with your right hand in a normal position holding the camera, the farther away from the camera (and your right hand) that your left, lens-holding hand is, the more equally the weight of the camera and lens is divided between your two hands and arms. The farthest distance away that you can get with your left hand is when you wrap your fingers around the bottom of the hood, making sure, of course, that they aren't then visible at the bottom of the frame. And yes, I do realize that is a truly terrible piece of grammar.

This method is especially helpful if you're shooting from a moving vehicle, or a chase-boat, since it's much more secure than simply resting the lens on your palm or fingers.

In addition to the more comfortable weight distribution between both hands and arms when using the lens hood as one of your two "stabilization points", the geometry of adding more distance between those two points provides a much more stable target acquisition in your viewfinder.

For example, if you're aiming a rifle at a target, and doing it badly, with one hand operating the trigger, and the other hand too close to the trigger hand, your front sight is going to be wiggling all over the place. But the farther you move the non-trigger hand forward, the more stable the sight becomes. Just don't shoot your hand off.




Oct 11, 2016 at 09:52 AM







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