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Bob Jarman
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p.1 #1 · p.1 #1 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


From a pre-revolutionary war re-enactment.

More to follow as time permits. This, a blacksmith was illustrating how knives were made and the science of creating the proper edge.

Bob






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Edited on Jun 11, 2014 at 11:20 PM · View previous versions



Jun 08, 2014 at 12:15 AM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #2 · p.1 #2 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Nice. Hands well rendered., good light and detail.


Jun 08, 2014 at 01:26 AM
RustyBug
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p.1 #3 · p.1 #3 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Excellent lighting.

Looks like layered steel ... any shots of the blade?



Jun 08, 2014 at 02:16 AM
ben egbert
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p.1 #4 · p.1 #4 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


That is a very strong image.


Jun 08, 2014 at 02:21 AM
RustyBug
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p.1 #5 · p.1 #5 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


ben egbert wrote:
That is a very strong image.


+1 ... Indeed.



Jun 08, 2014 at 03:28 AM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #6 · p.1 #6 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Damascus steel and wootz are always fascinating.


Jun 08, 2014 at 06:43 AM
RustyBug
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p.1 #7 · p.1 #7 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


A little bit on the subject ... nobody knows how to REALLY make Damascus or Wootz steel. It is a lost art, but the term is being utilized to reference the practice of drawing out layered blades by folding the steel. Considered to be an approximated "reverse engineering", but still not the real thing.

A very interesting subject that includes reorganization of molecular structure during the process to yield different areas of the blade with different properties of hardness/brittleness for it strength/edge characteristics.

Bob's image is excellent to draw us to the hands that are crafting such fine work, Would love to see corresponding image that draws us to the work (reversed message) @ this is what was made in concert with Bob's, these are the hands it takes to make it.

A couple of excerpts:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damascus_steel

Since the well-known technique of pattern welding produced surface patterns similar to those found on Damascus blades, some blacksmiths were erroneously led to believe that Damascus blades were made using this technique, but today, the difference between wootz steel and pattern welding is fully documented and well understood. Pattern-welded steel has been referred to as "Damascus steel" since 1973 when Bladesmith William F. Moran unveiled his "Damascus knives" at the Knifemakers' Guild Show.[16][17]

This "Modern Damascus" is made from several types of steel and iron slices welded together to form a billet, and currently the term "damascus" (although technically incorrect) is widely accepted to describe modern pattern welded steel blades in the trade .[18] The patterns vary depending on how the smith works the billet.[17] The billet is drawn out and folded until the desired number of layers are formed.[17] In order to attain a Master Smith rating with the American Bladesmith Society that Moran founded, the smith must forge a damascus blade with a minimum of 300 layers.[19]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wootz_steel

When last visiting (April 19, 1876) the Mahabaleshwar Hills near Bombay, I had the pleasure to meet Mr. Joyner, C.E., and with his assistance made personal inquiries into the process. The whole of the Sayhddri range (Western Ghats), and especially the great-Might-of-Shiva mountains, had for many ages supplied Persia with the best steel. Our Government, since 1866, forbade the industry, as it threatened the highlands with disforesting. The ore was worked by the Hill-tribes, of whom the principal are the Dhdnwars, Dravidians now speaking Hindustani. Only the brickwork of their many raised furnaces remained. For fuel they preferred the Jumbul-wood, and the Anjan or iron-wood. They packed the iron and fourteen pounds of charcoal in layers and, after two hours of bellows-working, the metal flowed into the forms. The Kurs' (bloom), five inches in diameter by two and a half deep, was then beaten into tiles or plates. The matrix resembled the Brazilian, a poor yellow-brown limonite striping the mud-coloured clay; and actual testing disproved the common idea that the "watering" of the surface is found in the metal. The Jauhar, ("jewel" or ribboning) of the so-called Damascus blade was produced artificially, mostly by drawing out the steel into thin ribbons which were piled and welded by the hammer. Oral tradition in India maintains that a small piece of either white or black hematite (or old wootz) had to be included in each melt, and that a minimum of these elements must be present in the steel for the proper segregation of the micro carbides to take place.



Jun 08, 2014 at 01:10 PM
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #8 · p.1 #8 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Thanks everyone,

appreciate your thoughts and comments. I was busy trying to remain inconspicuous and respectful of the discussion - Fuji certainly aided in that.

Kent - thanks for the interesting research, helps put things in perspective.

Image shows context....

More to follow, right now garden and yard beckon

Bob




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Jun 08, 2014 at 04:11 PM
RustyBug
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p.1 #9 · p.1 #9 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


While true Damascus blade making has been lost ... it offers a point of significance to your image above showing the explanation of "passdown" @ keeping alive what we currently know.

Sadly, we too often think that "old ways" are surpassed/supplanted by technology, but sometimes they just don't make 'em like the used to.

In a similar vein to our own passions of craftsmanship, the tenets of light utilization known to the masters of yore are being "lost" on generations of techno cameras replacing the study of light with the programming of buttons ... another

I've got a date with a knifemaker in Missouri ... "someday" ... to chronicle and present (your hands will be a very tough act to follow) the craft and customize a blade to put in my Leatherman.

Again, excellent work Bob.



Jun 08, 2014 at 04:40 PM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #10 · p.1 #10 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Actually, I used "damascus" as the generic name for layer patterned steel. There is plenty written about wootz and various attempts to duplicate it and some of the more recent research is likely very close, based upon microscopic examination, as I recall. OTOH, it also seems the more I read, the more folks disagree. It's a lot like researching/arguing how to duplicate a Stradivarius violin.

I'm perplexed why a wiki would suggest the term was coined in 1973. I first read it in the 1960's. A quick google found a reference in a book with a 1954 copyright mentioning a written reference to Damascus steel from 1841. I'm sure some effort would find many others and probably much older ones. And, making many layers is fairly easy. They increase as a power of two by folding. For 512 layers, fold nine times.

As I recall, part of the problem determining how wootz was made is there were two parts performed in two different places. The steel making was done in one place and the sword making was done in Persia. In the same way some researchers emphasize the wood of a violin and others the techniques of building the violin, there are different views on the making of the steel versus the crafting of the blades. (Had a good book on Wootz swords and sword making some years ago. Had to let it go during one of my house moves. Beautifully illustrated.)

Edited on Jun 09, 2014 at 01:19 AM · View previous versions



Jun 08, 2014 at 09:40 PM
 

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geneva
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p.1 #11 · p.1 #11 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


good


Jun 08, 2014 at 11:21 PM
sbeme
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p.1 #12 · p.1 #12 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Great job, Bob. No suggestions. Just a request.
More please!
Scott



Jun 09, 2014 at 02:25 AM
RustyBug
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p.1 #13 · p.1 #13 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


I don't take the term as being "coined" in 1973 ... more re-introduced into usage (likely as a psuedo-branding attention getter) by way of a (what should have been, imo) "Damascus-like". Your parallel to Strad is also a good example, as well.

Anyway, an interesting subject and one that Bob has so skillfully crafted into a strong and well delivered message.

+1 @ Scott for more.



Jun 09, 2014 at 04:02 AM
Wildcats_Fans
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p.1 #14 · p.1 #14 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Great shot. I like the composition, lighting and B&W processing. Does it change the dramatic style of the image if you lightened the tip of blade more?


Jun 09, 2014 at 03:36 PM
Oregon Gal
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p.1 #15 · p.1 #15 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Wonderful image and processing. I really like your choice of subject and framing, well done!


Jun 09, 2014 at 06:33 PM
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #16 · p.1 #16 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Thanks Barbara,

Glad you like it.

Bob



Jun 10, 2014 at 12:54 PM
FarmerJohn
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p.1 #17 · p.1 #17 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Really nice image Bob. Good composition and lines. I also liked your other post but this is definitely the better composition. I think you could use some selective adjustments here to accentuate the knife itself without adding harshness to the hands. My main complaint on this one is that the lower left tip of the knife is too dark and loses detail. Not sure if that's due to lighting or heavy vignette? But the sharp and pointy end deserves a little more attention.


Jun 11, 2014 at 05:09 AM
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #18 · p.1 #18 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


FarmerJohn wrote:
Really nice image Bob. Good composition and lines. I also liked your other post but this is definitely the better composition. I think you could use some selective adjustments here to accentuate the knife itself without adding harshness to the hands. My main complaint on this one is that the lower left tip of the knife is too dark and loses detail. Not sure if that's due to lighting or heavy vignette? But the sharp and pointy end deserves a little more attention.



Thanks John,

Great point!


Need to go back and correct that - vignette I believe.

Bob



Jun 11, 2014 at 02:03 PM
dhou
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p.1 #19 · p.1 #19 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


Black and white processing fantastic look for this image and great use of negative space.

Bob - Was this a blacksmith local to you?



Jun 11, 2014 at 04:45 PM
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #20 · p.1 #20 · Smithy - Crosspost B&WV + ReWork


dhou wrote:
Black and white processing fantastic look for this image and great use of negative space.

Bob - Was this a blacksmith local to you?


Thank you for the kind comments.

The blacksmiths, or at least one lives, nearby. The forge is part of a local community's American History Park. I'm not sure to what extent they are involved in park itself, however I suspect they play more than a casual role.

The next re-enactment is in October; I plan to return and hopefully learn more. PM me if you'd like the e-mail of the knife wielder.

Thanks for asking and your interest,

Regards,

Bob


Trying to add and not over-cook things








Jun 11, 2014 at 11:10 PM





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