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Portrait exposure question
  
 
FarmerJohn
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p.1 #1 · Portrait exposure question


Working some more on portraits... just double checking some things
Is this WB/exposure right? the LR "Auto" functions seems way overly bright to me....
Indoor, bounced flash.

#1 - My Edits


#1A - Wider scene crop


#2 - With "Auto Tone", but my WB edits.




Apr 08, 2014 at 03:36 PM
Almass
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p.1 #2 · Portrait exposure question


The eternal problem of Flash color temp correction aggravated with LR.

1- Your WB is way off

2- Your WB reads 5000k, it should be between 3500/4000k.

3- Your Flash should have a CTO gel as you are shooting under tungstene.

4- The skin of the Lady lacks Cyan and should be brought back.

5- This is a PS and not an LR job.....unless you are good at CC and at LR.

6- Yes, it is salvageable.



Apr 08, 2014 at 07:36 PM
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #3 · Portrait exposure question


Here is a quick rework in CS6 - reduced reds saturation & dropped brightness, increased contrast. My guess as to complexion.

Bob







Apr 08, 2014 at 10:15 PM
RustyBug
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p.1 #4 · Portrait exposure question


+1 @ mixed lighting influence.

Curious @ how you were assessing / determining your WB?

One thing to note about using flash for a balanced exposure with ambient ... it means that your exposure is partly coming from flash and partly coming from ambient so the two add up to a given exposure value.

All good if the two color sources are the same temp (such as with flash balanced to daylight while shooting in daylight). However, if you are shooting in mixed light (mixed color lighting) of flash (daylight) + incandescent/tungsten (warm) then it becomes part flash (daylight) + tungsten (warm) = something in between in those areas that the light sources are blended.

So, you can wind up with three different WB's (or a gradient @ falloff) in the same image.

1. The Blended value: where ambient and flash overlap
2. Flash: where ambient would otherwise be a shadow and only flash reaches
3. Ambient: where flash does not reach (either as a blocked/shadow, or falloff won't allow for it at a distance, such as the background

Accordingly, it requires a study of the light being received from flash, ambient and blend before you assess the WB. Unfortunately, LR or PS or others are making an ASSUMPTION that the image has a SINGLE WB value. Based on that assumption, Auto will almost always be WRONG when you have mixed lighting as such.

The correction @ time of shoot is to gel / match your flash color to your ambient color (even if only closer) as already mentioned. That or you can overpower ambient so that you retain the majority of WB influence @ your flash WB, but then you aren't balancing ambient / flash exposure anymore, so it kinda cuts both ways. You just have to be aware as to which color of light you are illuminating the various portions of your scene with and adjust in PP accordingly if they aren't uniform, i.e. mixed lighting.

If we look at the two sleeves, we can see the color diff pretty readily as one is illuminated by more flash than the other (falloff), as well as the directional aspect of the ambient where it reaches/doesn't reach. The same applies to the hair color variation as well.

My strategy is to neutralize the subject's eyelashes for the shadow values and neutralize the specular highlight of her earring for highlight values ... then leaving the stronger ambient influences to fall as they may for kicker / accent (although they could be corrected independently as well).









Edited on Apr 09, 2014 at 01:56 AM · View previous versions



Apr 09, 2014 at 12:28 AM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #5 · Portrait exposure question


I think the original adjustments are pretty close. Bob and Kent's versions look desaturated on my display. Might suggest a few very small changes bump the hue slightly, increase the mid-tone contrast and a few dabs of retouching, assuming my display is color management is ok. Although it's possibly time to re-calibrate it.







Apr 09, 2014 at 01:28 AM
 

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FarmerJohn
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p.1 #6 · Portrait exposure question


Whoa, lots of opinions!
At least everyone agrees the Auto tone (not Auto WB) was way too bright.

My display was calibrated a few days ago. ColorMunki Smile for color and this link for luminance.

Bob's version looks wayyyy undersaturated on my display. Almost BW on the face.
Karen and Kent's look pretty good to me, but Kent's is definitely less saturated than Karen's.

Kent, I'm trying to figure out the strategy.
I still don't get the point about Hue adjustment, or how much I should be using? Any more detailed suggestions?
I reduced the magenta tint by a little bit based on the feedback I got from Karen last time.
For this one, since I have the original Canon 5D and lots of people on the internet say it has 'legendary' skin tones, I left the Temp As-Shot from the camera. The internet can't be wrong, right?

But maybe I should have reduced it a little bit.

Here's a slightly different version... but I think I like the first one more






Apr 09, 2014 at 04:51 AM
AuntiPode
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p.1 #7 · Portrait exposure question


I of course don't know the subject, but I expect the first version is closer to the subject's preference than your last.


Apr 09, 2014 at 09:51 AM
Almass
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p.1 #8 · Portrait exposure question


Quick fixes:

1- Color balance
2- Smooth skin and imperfections
3- Remove Dbl Chin
3- Whiten teeth
4- Color her cheek
5- Brighten eye







Apr 09, 2014 at 12:27 PM
Bob Jarman
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p.1 #9 · Portrait exposure question


Why I try not to mess with other people's portraits

thanking back, in LR you can probably use the HSL and Luminance panel sliders to get in the ball park. As an aside, I've usually had pretty good success, for me anyway, using the teeth or white of the eye to set WB with the dropper in LR.

Bob



Apr 09, 2014 at 01:19 PM
FarmerJohn
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p.1 #10 · Portrait exposure question


Almass, thanks for the edits. The skin looks a little too red to me on my screen...

Bob - do you have a calibrated monitor? That ColorMunki Smile is pretty inexpensive and seems to do a decent job. I haven't used any others though.

I'll try the eye or teeth too.



Apr 09, 2014 at 05:08 PM





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